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Casino gambling has spread throughout the world, and continues to spread. As governments try to cope with fiscal pressures, legalized casinos offer a possible source of additional tax revenue.

But casino gambling is often controversial, as some people have moral objections to gambling. In addition, a small percentage of the population may become pathological gamblers who may create significant social costs.

On the benefits side, casinos are often purported to spur economic growth increases in GDPemployment, and tax revenues. However, these benefits have been questioned. Does casino expansion simply "cannibalize" other industries, having no net effect?

Or does casino gambling have significant positive economic impacts?

The Economics of Casino Gambling is a comprehensive discussion of the social and economic costs and benefits of legalized gambling. It is the only comprehensive discussion of these issues available on the market. Koleksiku Bantuan Penelusuran Buku Lanjutan. Beli eBuku - RUB The Economics of Casino Gambling.

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Halaman terpilih Halaman Judul. Casino gambling and economic growth. Misconceptions about casinos and growth. Evidence on the growth effects of gambling. Isolated state lottery model. Relationships among US gambling industries.

The social costs of gambling. Miscellaneous social cost issues. Problems in gambling research. Why gambling is not a DUP activity.

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DUP and rent seeking. Grinols and Mustard Gazel Rickman and Thompson Appendix Primer on microeconomics.

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A2 The indifference curve. A4 Supply demand and markets. A5 Producer and consumer surplus. As governments try to cope with fiscal pressures, legalized casinos offer a possible source of Walker Pratinjau tidak tersedia - Istilah dan frasa umum.

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  1. The Australian Gambling Research Centre (AGRC) provides high quality, evidence-based publications and resources for policy-makers, researchers and professionals in the area of This report investigates the current extent of betting restrictions and it's impact in driving consumers to illegal offshore wagering operators.:
    Casino developments have created important contributions to the tourism industries in recent years (Wan, ). The numbers and capacities of casinos have rapidly grown in the Asia-Pacific region, including Australia, New Zealand, South Korea, Cambodia, Myanmar, Philippines, Macau, and Singapore (Hsu, , p. xix). Commissioned by Gambling Research Australia, this research explored the relationship between casinos and local gamblers, the regulatory environment and the effect of promotional and responsible gambling initiatives. The aim of the project was to identify how casinos are responding to the changing. RG Journal Impact: *. *This value is calculated using ResearchGate data and is based on average citation counts from work published in this journal. The data used in the calculation may not be exhaustive.
  2. Development, Operation, and Impact Kaye Sung Chon, Cathy Hc Hsu. chines to Queensland clubs Community gambling patterns and the prevalence of gambling-related problems in South Australia, with particular reference to gaming machines. Adelaide: Journal of Economic Perspectives, 13(1), Johnson, J.:
    Australia's gambling industries: A submission to the Productivity Commission's inquiry into Australia's gambling industry. Alampi G (ed). Gale state rankings reporter. Detroit, MI: Gale Research, Inc. Albanese J. The effect of casino gambling on crime. Federal National Tax Journal – American. According to the IGA Explanatory Memorandum, the potential for the interactive gaming industry to expand rapidly and exacerbate problem gambling in Australia was a major concern for the Government.[17] For example, a US National Gambling Impact Study Commission found that in May , there were approximately. Journal of Education Finance – ——. Casino gambling in Report to the National Gambling Impact Study Commission; nguyensan.me Grinols, Earl L. Gambling in Gambling as a source of government revenue in Australia. In Gambling in Australia, edited by.
  3. 'Japan's $42bn casino bet at risk', Wall Street Journal, reprinted in Weekend Australian, 17‒18 May, p. [Google Scholar]). The long-term predominant casino market player in Asia, Macau, has responded with a number of new casinos and initiatives that now see it dwarf Las Vegas as the world's largest.:
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The last section reviews the economic and social impacts for various regions. Extensive bibliographies, helpful tables, and fascinating photographs are also included. Casino Industry in Asia Pacific discusses: Development, Operation, and Impact is an essential resource for graduate students, advanced undergraduate students, educators, researchers, gaming policymakers and lobbyists, concerned civic organization leaders and members, casino developers and executives, hotel professionals, travel and tourism professionals, and anyone interested in the gaming industry.

Development, Operation, and Impact is a one-of-a-kind Development, Operation, and Impact Cathy H. Hsu Pratinjau terbatas - Development, Operation, and Impact is a one-of-a-kind comprehensive review of the gaming industry in various countries in the Asia-Pacific Miscellaneous social cost issues. Problems in gambling research. Why gambling is not a DUP activity. DUP and rent seeking. Grinols and Mustard Gazel Rickman and Thompson Appendix Primer on microeconomics. A2 The indifference curve.

A4 Supply demand and markets. A5 Producer and consumer surplus. As governments try to cope with fiscal pressures, legalized casinos offer a possible source of Betting Motivation and Behavior.

Speculation Calculus or Fun? Insider Trading in Betting Markets. The Efficiency of Soccer Betting Markets. The Efficiency of Pelota Betting Markets. How the Baseball Betting Market. What Explains the Existence of an Exchange Overround? Betting on Simultaneous Events and Accumulator Gambles. A Primer on the Mathematics of Gambling. The Science and Economics of Poker. The Efficiency of Lottery Markets. A Survey of the Literature.

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The Government asserts that these measures will not completely eliminate access to overseas gambling sites — its aim is to limit and to discourage. No matters have been referred to law enforcement agencies for investigation. This paper will not examine the validity of such data.

Similarly, whether the receipt of 11 complaints to the ABA is indicative of a lack of prohibited content being offered to Australian online-gamers, or rather reflects a flawed complaints scheme, is uncertain without further research. Further required information may include:. Forty-two submissions were received for the review which closed on 23 March , and as yet there has been no indication of when the review be released.

Given the controversial nature of this issue, and the Federal election later in , it is anticipated that politics will prove to be highly influential in affecting the outcome of the review. Accordingly, it is likely that the actual model will not change. Nonetheless, the statistics, even in , may support an assumption that the model is not working. Therefore, it is imperative to determine why prohibition is not working.

According to the IGA Explanatory Memorandum, the potential for the interactive gaming industry to expand rapidly and exacerbate problem gambling in Australia was a major concern for the Government. A year later, there were more than online casinos, 64 lotteries, 20 bingo games and sports books available to anyone with Internet access. Therefore, the Government sought a strategy to restrict the access of Australians to interactive gambling whilst balancing the interests of the information economy.

The IGA Explanatory Memorandum states that prohibition and not regulation was chosen for the following key reasons:. Although it was clear that increased accessibility to gambling services are linked to increased social costs, uncertainty existed as to the extent of the increase.

The likely cause was differing taxation regimes. The required balance to be found in taxing a regulated Internet gambling environment that encourages industry growth, satisfies government fiscal requirements, and is socially acceptable, was clearly lacking. The key arguments against prohibition are examined below. This section will argue that prohibition is not an effective solution given certain factors unique to the Internet which may frustrate its effective operation.

Prohibition will still enable Australians to access any foreign-based sites which have not been subject to the complaints scheme, as the Internet offers an instant detour around domestic prohibitions. However, there is no doubt that prohibition can effectively prevent Australian-based providers from offering services within Australia.

Even if certain portals or sites are filtered, the ability of a firm to alter its URL and relocate immediately is relatively easy. Of course, the consumer can also play elsewhere with abundant choice.

Evidence from Lasseters Online indicates that 70 per cent of online players register with four or more gaming operators. However, given the preliminary statistics used to support the assumption that prohibition is not working, it is clear the unique nature of the Internet will allow users to escape domestic prohibitions. The implication from the above Lasseters Online information is that the Australians currently accessing Australian gaming sites may already be playing on a number of overseas sites.

With tremendous industry growth, consumers will gamble on the overseas sites knowing that they will not be prosecuted, despite the risks of playing on unregulated sites. This will also mean the loss of a revenue stream that could have been used to fund harm minimisation measures.

The NT Government also argue that if the estimate that 2. Therefore, given the innovative technological framework within which the Internet exists, and in light of preliminary evidence leading to the assumption that prohibition is not working, it is clear that the source of the problem is the prohibition model itself.

Internet communications utilize packet switching. They are also almost impossible to prevent without significantly more invasive powers of detection for enforcement agencies.

The NT Government commented in that the filtering provisions are no advance on current practice. The consensus amongst these views is that it is inappropriate for the government to argue that technological solutions are available to support prohibition. There has been tremendous growth in the uptake of information technology and e-commerce services by Australians in the s.

This assumption lacks sufficient justification and contradicts extensive independent evidence to the contrary. Prohibition generally occurs when something is against the religious mores of a culture. Alternatively, the pragmatic viewpoint would argue that regulation be adopted; that is, it cannot be stamped out, and should therefore be controlled [56] for example, to prevent problem or underage gambling, and to prevent criminal elements from becoming involved.

However, the Government still chose prohibition despite extensive and independent research recommending regulation. This section will first identify the views supporting regulation, and second, posit that prohibition may have been a purely political move, and not an appropriate solution to the online-gaming problem.

This will be linked to the key issue that prohibition is not currently working as the model was never supported by a majority of affected stakeholders. Since Netbets, a clear Federal Government policy shift supporting prohibition has occurred:. When clear and substantial evidence to support regulation existed, how could the Government justify its decision to choose prohibition? This section will answer two questions: Unlike previous studies, this report was conducted from the presumption that prohibition will be implemented.

This is obvious from the title of the report. Interestingly, 70 per cent of the 59 public submissions received by the NOIE after the Moratorium Act recommended regulation, yet the report did not. Sirat Mahmuda Bob Webb. Urban heat island UHI describes the higher temperature that occurs in built-up areas compared to surrounding natural landscapes. The article identifies the evidence of UHI in the Australian Capital Territory ACT and the extent to which the Territory is addressing this through urban planning and climate adaptation regimes.

Remotely sensed data were used to retrieve land surface temperature to outline the spatial form of surface heat hotspots. It was found that established town centres in the Territory have hotspots. Hotspots were also found in grasslands, bare ground and dry forests. Research from other jurisdictions provides insights on potential UHI responses at city, neighbourhood and building scales.

Whilst current ACT Government planning and adaptation regimes do not address UHI explicitly, they do promote urban forests, integrated open space and urban water bodies which, along with various building standards and guides, can help ameliorate UHI. Urban intensification will occur in areas that are already identified as hotspots. This, along with the potential impacts of climate change, will require more explicit and increased focus on UHI in the future.

With growing interest in temporary public space in Australia and internationally, this article examines the potential role of temporary public space in the lives of children. It considers whether the short-term, interactive nature of temporary public space supports or inhibits children's need for play and connection to community.

The author examines the opinions of children aged 5—12 about a Melbourne based Pop-Up Park. The findings suggest that temporary public space provides children with a wide variety of socio-spatial offerings including opportunities for unstructured creative play, connection with community and relaxation. The author concludes with some thoughts about the potential role of temporary public space in the Child-Friendly Cities movement and children's participation in urban planning.

However, some wicked policy problems are further complicated by a significant moral, psychological, religious or cultural dimension. This is particularly the case for problems that possess strong elements of abjection and symbolic pollution and high degrees of psychosocial sensitivity.

Because this affects the way these problems are framed and discussed they are also characterised by high levels of verbal proscription. As a result, they are not discussed in the rational and emotion-free way that conventional planning demands and can become obscured or inadequately acknowledged in planning processes. This further contributes to their wickedness and intractability. Through paradigmatic urban planning examples, we argue that placing their unspeakable nature at the forefront of enquiry will enable planners to advocate for a more contextually and culturally situated approach to planning, which accommodates both emotional and embodied talk alongside more technical policy contributions.

Re-imagining wicked problems in this way has the potential to enhance policy and plan-making and to disrupt norms, expose their contingency, and open new ways of planning for both the unspeakable and the merely wicked. The design speculation and action research assemblage: The planning problems of neo-liberal cities require theories and methods that are adequate to the task of engaging as well as understanding their fragmented opacity.

This paper reports on research that combines well-established processes of action research and design studio teaching with more recent interest in assemblage theory. Framed by the need to find ways to achieve significant modal shift toward active transport in a car-dependent city, the project brought 15 industry partners from state and local government, transport companies and the design sector together around a series of architectural and urban design studios for real sites.

The outcomes of the project allow a deeper understanding of how transformative the focus on the relationship between network planning, urban renewal, interchange design and the removal of level crossings could be in bringing Melbourne's 19th century rail system into the 21st century. Health service access in urban growth areas: Dec Australian Planner. Population growth, especially in urban areas, is projected to increase in the near future. In response, residential growth is commonly channelled into urban growth areas located on the suburban fringe of major city centres.

There is a need for adequate infrastructure provision, such as health services, to meet the population demands in urban growth areas.

Access to health services is a key social determinant of health, and having adequate access can help reduce health inequities.

This review examines literature considering primary and secondary health services access in new urban growth areas, with a focus on Melbourne, Australia. Academic and grey literature were sourced and reviewed. Themes revealed include challenges in providing spatial and social access to health services.

Both nationally and internationally, we found that few studies considered health services access when planning for urban growth. Further research is required to examine how health service access is planned for in urban growth areas. Such research may contribute to reducing health inequity.

Locating and quantifying public transport provision with respect to social need in Canberra, Australia. Nathan Pittman Jennifer Eve Day.

This paper identifies vulnerable, transport-poor populations in the Canberra Metropolitan Region, and in doing so, makes two significant contributions to the literature.

The first contribution is methodological, advancing accessibility indicators compared with previous attempts in the literature. The second contribution is policy-relevant, identifying significant spatial gap of service in Queanbeyan, east of Canberra. The findings are consistent with similar research projects in Australia; however, this particular research presents an example of transport disadvantage arising from governance, rather than from any particular social-spatial relationship to the configuration of the city.

The findings suggest that public policy and public transport planning does not yet effectively reach across the state border.

Greenhouse gas emission reductions from Canberra's light rail project. Australia has one of the highest per capita rates of greenhouse gas GHG emissions in the world as well as one of the highest percentages of urban dwellers, focusing attention on the need for our cities to reduce emissions.

This study estimates the GHG emission reductions that will be achieved by the first stage of Canberra's light rail network, which will commence operation in Spatial growth in Australian homes — Michael McMullan Robert Fuller. The average new Australian home has grown from a four-roomed Victorian timber cottage of around m2 at the start of the twentieth century to a m2 brick-veneer house in The homes have grown in both size and number of rooms. Where has this growth occurred? How has Australia's average new house transitioned to now become the largest in the world?

This paper traces where the growth has occurred within the house over the last 50 years. Thirty-nine houses in a suburb of Geelong, Victoria, have been analysed over the five decades, and the median house of the sample in each era has been used for the analysis.

The results confirm the overall trend in house growth size that can be seen in national statistics. Most of the growth in house size has been due to the increase in living areas and in the number of and area used for bedrooms. Other variables of interest in understanding changes in Australian housing such as gross floor area, plot ratio, site size and house shape and orientation are also discussed in the context of limiting the impact of oversize houses.

The subdivision of suburban lots to accommodate additional dwellings has been one of the most popular mechanisms for achieving urban infill in Australian cities.

They are evidence of some alignment between the supply and demand sides of the infill housing equation — a necessary, and yet somewhat elusive condition in today's economic landscape.

Local governments are, however, somewhat reluctant to continue to facilitate this process of residential intensification, despite sustained pressure to increase infill dwelling numbers, citing poor outcomes in terms of the resulting qualities of the residential environment as a chief reason. How could the current residential planning and design policy R-codes be successfully amended to re-enable a pre-existing and demonstrably popular mechanism, which potentially aligns both demand and supply, and thereby significantly contribute to meeting infill targets in the future?

The research, undertaken in partnership with the City of Fremantle, attempts to address this question. Chris Hale Serryn Eagleson. The paper begins with a discussion of general trends across planning cultures and planning rhetoric, alongside tangible drivers of change in city infrastructure.

Industry cultures, and the lines of discussion they produce in various locations, are seemingly influenced by person-to-person interaction as much as actual planning documentation or empirical evidence. Further intriguing comparison begins to emerge when attributes such as rail system scale are considered. Five different categories of city are ultimately developed — based on metropolitan population scaling. The paper then re-emphasises leading influences on urban policy and infrastructure outcomes some are well-known, but others are sometimes either hidden from discussion or treated casually.

It then involves qualitative inquiry into the drivers and priorities of a selection of prominent institutional exemplars in order to allow us clearer reflection on how these influencers might facilitate progress, or otherwise, on issues like smart growth and sustainable infrastructure development. Findings emphasise the idea that planning and infrastructure policy formulation and research should emerge beyond the current tendency for ad hoc and incoherent sources of influence. Managing expectations for sustainability in a changing context — in Sydney's —inner west — a GreenWay governance case study.

This case study documents the actions taken by a community to create a greenway in a medium density urban environment in Sydney's inner west, the Cooks River to Iron Cove GreenWay.

The vision is to create a pedestrian and cycle path through regenerated bushland and urban parks, making use of a disused rail corridor.

The 5 km corridor aims to link the community and natural environment to two of Sydney's water assets, and is consistent with state and local government goals to create a more sustainable and liveable urban environment. The GreenWay came tantalisingly close to being realised, until the political context changed. The case study explores: Specifically, we divide the Handbook into sections on casinos, sports betting, horserace betting, betting strategy, motivation, behavior and decision-making in betting markets, prediction markets and political betting, and lotteries and gambling machines.

Halaman terpilih Halaman Judul. The Economics of Casino Taxation. The Elasticity of Casino Gambling. Overview of the Economic and Social Impacts of Gambling in. The Economics of Online Sports Betting. The Kelly Criterion with Games of Chance. Evidence from Event Studies in.

Betting Motivation and Behavior. Speculation Calculus or Fun? Insider Trading in Betting Markets. The Efficiency of Soccer Betting Markets.

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The Efficiency of Soccer Betting Markets. The Efficiency of Pelota Betting Markets. How the Baseball Betting Market. What Explains the Existence of an Exchange Overround? Betting on Simultaneous Events and Accumulator Gambles. A Primer on the Mathematics of Gambling. The Science and Economics of Poker. The Efficiency of Lottery Markets. A Survey of the Literature. It is divided into sections on casinos, sports betting, horserace betting Siegel Pratinjau terbatas - Istilah dan frasa umum.

On the benefits side, casinos are often purported to spur economic growth increases in GDP , employment, and tax revenues.

However, these benefits have been questioned. Does casino expansion simply "cannibalize" other industries, having no net effect? Or does casino gambling have significant positive economic impacts? The Economics of Casino Gambling is a comprehensive discussion of the social and economic costs and benefits of legalized gambling. It is the only comprehensive discussion of these issues available on the market. Koleksiku Bantuan Penelusuran Buku Lanjutan.

Beli eBuku - RUB The Economics of Casino Gambling. Halaman terpilih Halaman Judul. Casino gambling and economic growth. Jan Australian Planner. An important part of the feminist planning project is to make visible the many and varied contributions of women in planning.

However, despite the substantial advances of feminist movements, planning education and practice has yet to consistently understand and address the needs of marginalised groups, particularly women, and has struggled to adopt intersectionality as a fundamental planning concern. This has significant practical and political implications. This special issue explores the multiple ways that women are the objects and subjects of planning within structures of power.

This editorial positions the contributions in this issue by considering the extent to which planning has addressed the needs of women.

While we cannot trust that progress in this regard will continue to be linear and cumulative, we find cause, through these contributions, to celebrate both the legacy and the future of women in planning.

How planning limits its concern: Nov Australian Planner. As urban planners focus on creating more sustainable cities, there is an increasing need to plan for other species. Dogs however remain a neglected subject of urban planning scholarship and practice. This paper critically examines the practice of strategic planning as it applies to dogs in the urban context of Melbourne, Australia. Through a narrative of the institutional voices of practising strategic planners and other institutional discourse of local government, this paper provides a critical examination of how strategic planners shape — and limit — the concern of urban planning.

The conclusion is that background infill is producing mixed results, in all of these areas, and that the policies producing such infill require attention. Informed cities, making research work for local sustainability. Oct Australian Planner. The politics of land and food scarcity. Innovations in topographically sensitive urban design: Although local urban design policies of the past decade emphasised the value of conserving and expressing natural topography, terraces and retaining walls remained as the development standard.

More recently, topographically responsive planning and design innovations have emerged in several coastal suburban developments. Through four cases studies, the article evaluates the impact of these recent innovations on landform character conservation and suburban planning.

The article contributes to the ongoing development of topographically sensitive planning practices, which are pertinent within the global context of increasing coastal suburbanisation. Why planning limits its concern: This paper critically examines why urban planners exclude dogs as subjects of their plans through the voices of practising strategic planners in the urban context of Melbourne, Australia.

This paper characterises planning as being governed by two dimensions — the ontological and epistemological — and finds that the actions of planners in excluding dogs from consideration concerns the functioning of their ontologies of gatekeeper and practitioner as they negotiate and reshape the frontier of planning and its field of concern. The importance of anthropocentrism in governing how planners exclude dogs from planning in practice is shown to be profound.

Planning for the supply of more affordable housing: Emma Greenhalgh Caryl Bosman. Urban planning and the development system are mechanisms that can provide affordable housing and alleviate the cost of housing. This paper explores the use of a specific response to housing affordability and delivery of affordable housing in Queensland through the introduction of a statutory land authority, the Urban Land Development Authority ULDA.

The introduction of the ULDA was significant as it represents the first time that Queensland planning saw the introduction of planning-related legislation that could require affordable housing. Even more extraordinary was that the deliverables affordable housing sat outside the mainstream planning legislation of the time. Additionally, the establishment of the ULDA represents the first statutory land authority responsible for planning and development in Queensland.

While similar authorities have been operational in many States since at least , this was never the case in Queensland, but the Queensland response of the ULDA was unique in Australia in terms of its powers and structure. This paper considers that despite such extraordinary powers, the outcomes of the ULDA were not as effective as originally anticipated.

Remembering participation in planning: Apr Australian Planner. Elanna Nolan Alan March. This paper seeks to reclaim some ground and to maintain the currency of practical knowledge of participation among Australian planners.

A single instructive case is used to examine core participation values derived from communicative planning. The paper uses the illustrative case of an inner city Melbourne municipality, Yarra City Council, and their attempts to establish five new community gardens.

This paper considers why, after initiating the project in October , it had failed by April , despite widespread community support. Using the lens of communicative planning theory, we argue that the planning process for the community garden at HGR was doomed to fail from the beginning, demonstrating a lack of consideration for appropriate participation.

Using this case, we set out five lessons for participation, demonstrated by the application of communicative theory in this instance. We argue for early commitment to collaboration; planners taking an active role; active management of processes in parallel with statutory requirements; defining carefully community memberships; and maintaining good communication.

Selective clearing of bush close to houses is the top bushfire mitigation strategy. While the wild fire issue is certainly complex and may vary significantly across Australia, the clearing of the bush around houses is found to be the most effective measure.

The proposed solution of community funded clearing and collection of the waste biomass with valorisation of this biomass appears to be the most promising measure to mitigate the effects of bushfires in the years to come.

Quantifying changes in building footprint in the historic coastal town of Queenscliff. Reaburn Ursula de Jong Yolanda Esteban. The sea change phenomenon has attracted new residents to Australian coastal towns and brought with it expectations of residential housing formed in metropolitan settings. Much larger houses are now being built and site coverage has increased. To date, changes in character have been measured using data based on the subjective judgement of residents through surveys and interviews.

More objective information would be beneficial in understanding change. This paper describes a methodology that has been developed to quantify the change in the building footprint in the historic coastal town of Queenscliff in Victoria.

Using selected aerial photographs, the building footprint of the town's residential buildings has been estimated at four intervals from until This footprint has been compared to the block size at each interval so that changes in house-to-block ratio may be compared. The method developed here is a low-cost method of tracking footprint change over an extended period and informing local planners and residents of when and where the changes have occurred.

Validating and measuring public open space is not a walk in the park. Despite the widespread application of public open space POS in urban planning and health research, defining POS and the subsequent measurement remains an issue. Coupled with the issue of definition is the choice of data set, as the data accuracy can influence the research results. The interpretation of an analysis depends on the intended outcome and the data definition and accuracy.

The 4 ha of open space per population standard was calculated for three administrative spatial units local government areas, postcodes and suburbs. The number of spatial units that met or did not meet the standard was calculated and the VPOS data were taken as the data standard. For local governments areas most met the standard. The results varied depending on the spatial unit and choice of data and this demonstrated the importance of the choice of spatial data set and spatial unit.

Climate adaptation and urban planning for heat islands: Sirat Mahmuda Bob Webb. Urban heat island UHI describes the higher temperature that occurs in built-up areas compared to surrounding natural landscapes.

The article identifies the evidence of UHI in the Australian Capital Territory ACT and the extent to which the Territory is addressing this through urban planning and climate adaptation regimes. Remotely sensed data were used to retrieve land surface temperature to outline the spatial form of surface heat hotspots.

It was found that established town centres in the Territory have hotspots. Hotspots were also found in grasslands, bare ground and dry forests. Research from other jurisdictions provides insights on potential UHI responses at city, neighbourhood and building scales. Whilst current ACT Government planning and adaptation regimes do not address UHI explicitly, they do promote urban forests, integrated open space and urban water bodies which, along with various building standards and guides, can help ameliorate UHI.

Urban intensification will occur in areas that are already identified as hotspots. This, along with the potential impacts of climate change, will require more explicit and increased focus on UHI in the future. With growing interest in temporary public space in Australia and internationally, this article examines the potential role of temporary public space in the lives of children.

It considers whether the short-term, interactive nature of temporary public space supports or inhibits children's need for play and connection to community.

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