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  1. Rueda de Casino is a style of Salsa where several couples dance choreographically around a circle, with the dance moves being called by one person, a caller. This style . Cagua - Starts similar to Sombrero with the follow ending up on the right side of the lead, with arms around each other's shoulders.:
    Some of the basic moves are similar to Rueda de Casino moves, whilst others have been created to suit the style of the Bachata dance. . it with the toe of the free right foot on 2, LEs backstep onto the right foot on 3 and tap behind with the toe of the free left foot on 4; FO's meanwhile steps are a mirror image of the LE's. Image may contain: 15 people, people smiling, people standing and shoes. Image may contain: 14 people, people smiling, people standing. Image may contain: 10 people, people smiling, people standing. Image may contain: 11 people, people smiling. + Ritmos Latinos - Rueda de Casino added 63 photos to the album:  Missing: ars. See a rich collection of stock images, vectors, or photos for flash mob you can buy on Shutterstock. Explore quality images, photos, art & more.
  2. Typically, some of the members of this group —and definitely its top instructors—have traveled to Cuba and seen what rueda de casino is like there, realized that those DVDs they watched were only one small part of the picture, then returned home with that knowledge and made the necessary changes.:
    Havana - New salsa style at a dance studio. I've been teaching salsa for more than 15 years. I created my own school five years ago. My team and I have organized many events and parties for our students. I have participated twice in the popular Festival Santiago de Cuba as the main nguyensan.meg: ars.
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El Nudo - - Setenta, lead follow around back and then with your right hand blind lead follow from behind you around to in front, then setenta. Enchufla Avion - Starts with an enchufla and the lead holds the right hand of the follow with their left and steps forward with the lead's right arm over the follow's right. The lead should be standing with the follow's arm at chest height at the end of the eight count.

The lead then ducks under the follow's arm to the right, bringing the follow around. The lead should end up with their right hand over the right shoulder of the follow and lightly on the back of the neck of the follow. The lead, with their left arm, then rotates the follow's right arm up and around clockwise as the follow ducks their head under the right arm of the lead and the lead keeps their right hand on the back of the follow to guide both in half turn.

The lead should have their right hand on the back of the follow and as both move continue to move around each other, and the lead pushes the follow toward the next lead.

The lead then takes the partner ahead in a cross body lead. Enchufla con Dracula - - Enchufla and as the follow goes by, make a mock attempt to bite their neck. Enchufla con pa - Starts with an enchufla, switch hands and step ahead upstream of follow. Lead then steps into circle and on one says "Pah". Lead the follow behind into the center of the circle as lead goes into hammer lock and follows, like a sacala, says with "pah" sound on 5.

Lead is doing a cross step at this pint. The lead then backs out to the left and brings the follow in front and to the left while spinning the follow into a counter clockwise turn. At this point, lead is on the right facing in and follow is on left facing out with left arm under right. Lead the grabs the right hand of the follow on the right and steps forward and backward as follow steps backward and forward for an eight count.

Then on the next eight count, lead turns the follow, while still holding both lead's hands, on the left clockwise and hair combs the follow's hand over the lead's head, closely followed by the hand of follow on right, with whom is done a cross body. Enchufla Complicado - - Enchufla, and as the follow steps in front, the lead grabs the follows left with their right, then steps under, asks for the hand behind the leads back and the enchuflas again.

Then grab the right hand of the follow and present it to the next lead on the right while looking for the hand of the follow on the left. Enchufla the next follower and then back to neutral. Enchufla al Medio - - Enchufla, lead steps into the circle, then back out on the follows right. The follow and lead then alternatively step into and back out of the circle. The following moves are then called:. Enchufla Rodeala y Mambo - Starts like Seis with an enchufla, and the follow is lead behind and back in front of the lead.

When the follow is standing in front facing into the circle, a mambo is started on 7. The lead starts on the right and on left for follows and is done for five steps i. While doing the mambo, the lead keeps their right hand on the shoulder of the follow and can initiate the back-rock by pulling on the shoulder.

The lead then back rocks left then right, while leading the follow into a back rock on their right and left for an eight count. On the next eight count, the follow back rocks with the right foot again and then spins counter-clockwise to the right and is picked up for a cross body lead. Leads can also spin before picking up the follow. Enrocate - - Two cross body leads in a row over two eight counts, going Evelyn de Cuba - - Starts with an enchfula doble and when stopping the follow the second time, the lead spins to the right and faces the follow.

The lead should be right hand to right hand with the follow. Another enchufla, and the lead does a hook turn helps if the hand doing the enchufla is kept low and the lead pulls the follow behind their back to pass to next lead.

The lead then picks up the next follow to the right. Estrella Doble meaning two stars - Starts with an enchufla, then the leads walk into the center of the circle heading counter clockwise and put their left hands on the left shoulder of the lead ahead of them.

They then walk around the circle for two eight counts and on the 5,6,7 of the second eight count, the leads change direction back to clockwise and put their right hand on the right shoulder of the lead in front. The follows move in the opposite direction and switch direction at the same time, again going the opposite direction. After changing directions, both leads and follows walk in their respective directions for another eight count and on the second eight count they should be close to their original partners.

The leads then do a hook turn to the right and face their original partner, prepping to the right, in a right to right hand hold. On the next eight count, the lead then turns the follow around clockwise in place and as the follow comes around to face the lead again, the lead does another hook turn but stops when facing upstream away from the follow. The lead should be facing the next follow ahead of them and have, from behind them, the follow's right hand on the lead's right shoulder.

On the next eight count, the lead then drops the right hand on the right side of their body and throws it up in a arc over their body, while immediately doing a cross body lead of the next follow upstream. Fly - - On 5,6,7, jump to the right and clap killing the "fly". Mini is a sub call and the same movement is performed, but don't actually clap. Festival de Fly - Starting on 1, clap up to the right, then down to the left, the in front, clap once, then twice more.

The leads then cross arms and the follows pull their fists back on either side of their bodies and thrust their chest out. Everybody goes "huh" at the same time. Then clap once and then three quick claps and cross body the follow on the right. La Havana - - Starts with a two handed enchufla with check, then repeat. On the third two handed enchufla, the lead does a hook turn under and pulls the follow's hands down in front while the lead faces into the circle.

The lead then lifts their right arm up, then the left and, turning to the right a bit, leads the follow into a hammer lock. Unfold the hammer lock with a back break and then momentarily hook the follow's left arm with the lead's right elbow. Cross body back to finish. La Isaura - - Enchufla and as the lead passed the follow on the left, continue onto the next follow on the left, cross body, then go to the follow two down, i.

The pattern is one to your left, two to your right and then one back to the original partner. Jardin - - Enchufla and grab the follow's left hand with right and walk into the circle.

Then go under the arm raised by the lead on your left. Then wait for the Bota call then grab the hand of the follow on your left and enchufla the follow back into the slot, then cross body lead the follow.

Make sure to "explode" the circle when doing bota. Juana la Cubana - - Exactly as shown, start with sombrero, then keep your left hand high and spin the follow around to your left putting your left hand on the follow's left shoulder. Then pull the follow back to your right, keeping the follow's right hand low and fold it behind the follow's back and step up beside on the left. Put the follow's hand behind your head, then pull it out and sacala, and coming back into a sombrero.

Cross body lead back to wapea. La Jenny - - Enchufla, switching hands, then on the next eight count, cross-body lead back to the left and pull the follow behind the lead like paseala. After switching hands right to right , on the next eight count, pull the follow around in front and then spin the follow into a hammer lock with the follow's arm behind their back. At this point, the follow should be facing the lead with their right arm behind their back and the lead is facing downstream.

On the next eight count, then cross body lead, and catch the follow by the left shoulder. The lead should be facing inward slightly and the follow outward. On the next eight count, spin the follow to the clockwise and when they are facing the lead, the lead raises their arm and does a hook turn under it, ending up in the circle facing outward to the follow.

The lead then does a strong enchufla putting the follow momentarily in the circle before bringing the follow back into the slot on the right. La Pisa - - Enchufla and then lead and follow hold left and right hand respectively and lean back for 8 counts. Leonsio - - Start with Setenta, and like El Nudo, lead steps in front of follow and with left hand up, right hand low, turns to the right until facing into the circle and with arms, left over right, cross in front. On the next eight count, first raise the left on the right side of the body and then right hand on the left side , keeping the left up over the head as the lead turns to face the follow to the right.

The lead should now be in a hammer lock with their left arm behind, holding the follow's right hand. Then lead the follow until the lead is facing upstream counter-clockwise. The trick here is to rotate locked with the follow degrees, until the lead is facing upstream, and then pull the follow the rest of the way behind. The lead then steps under their own arm and turns to the left to face the follow downstream. You have done this part right if you are in a position, to do a two handed enchufla with hook turn show them the L with the arms , and cross body the follow back to neutral.

Mambo - On 5, hold the hands up and the lead step right on 5 left on 7 right on 1 left on 3 and then pushes off ready for the next eight count. This move is called on beat 3, not the typical 1.

Mambo Tipiando - Like Mambo, this start on 5 and the leads start their taps on the right and follows with their left. Two taps are done, i. Follows mirror the lead, tapping left, right, step left, cross and tap left, right, then back. The entire sequence of two taps, cross to the right, two taps and cross back is repeated twice and should end on a five with a hand press. Mariposa - - enchufla then sacala and as the follow comes back, continue to pull them out of the way and grab the right hand of the next follow.

Enchufla and hook turn and then enchufla and cross body back to neutral. Melody - Enchufla and the lead stands in front and to the right of the follow, looking over their left shoulder at the follow.

The follow and lead, in a similar manner to Dos or Cubanito back rock, four times, then the lead picks up the next follow. Mezclado - - Leads turns to the follow on the right and catches the hand and brings the follow to the left, then catch the hand of the right hand follow again but spin the follow on the left nobody lets go! Leads then spin the follow on left into a hammer lock. Back out of the hammer lock, bring the arms up and hook in the elbows. Make a little dip.

Then back break again and do a hook turn under the follow's arms, then switch places again back into a sombrero. Noventa ninety - - as shown, the trick is to lift the left hand and step under it. Ochenta y uno - - enchufla and switch hands, lead the follow into a sacala with the right hand and as the follow comes back, hair comb the right hand over the follow's head.

Palmadas - Enchufla and like Enchufla con Mambo , the lead and follow stand next to each other and count out the follow steps to time - stomp left and right, then clap once, then stomp left and right again and clap two times. Lead picks up the follow they are facing. Parte el brazo - - Lead the follow clockwise and into the center of the circle. Lead puts right hand on follow's left shoulder and then, back stepping, grabs the back of the follows right hand and spins to the left, spinning the follow as well.

Then enchufla back into neutral. Parte el Brazo Complicado - - Similar to Parte el brazo, but after back stepping, put the follows arms behind their back when they face into the centre. Paseala - - Pull the follow behind your back. Paseala y Complicate - - Starts with an enchufla, then two Paseala, then on the second one, the lead swings their right hand over their head and as the follow passes behind them, grabs the follow's left hand.

The lead should be in front of and to the left of the follow in a left to left and right to right hand hold. On the next eight count, the lead then pulls the follow forward and wraps the follow. One the next eight count, the follow is unwrapped and spun to the right, keep the left hand low behind the back and the right hand leading the turn. To help the follow unwravel, the lead should turn when turning the follow.

Then end in a sombrero facing into the circle. Patin - - Do an enchufla doble, then another one and lead goes into the center, put arms on the shoulders of the other leads and step with left foot behind right and then right behind left, then spin back out and grab the partner to your right not the same follower!!

When joining the other leads, to put left hand low and right hand high and to start with left behind right. Prima y Enredala - - Prima and catch the hand of the follow on the right, back step and pull the follow on your left into a counter clock wise spin.

While pulling the follow out, hair comb your right arm over your heard, face to your left. Then repeat, back step and rotate the follow on your left, etc. Once facing outward, continue to rotate to your left and back out under their arms. You should be backing out under the arms of the two follows and backing out of the circle. Take the hand of the follow on your right, stamp your foot, and lead the follow around your back and enchufla, then put the follow's hand on your shoulder and go the next follow on your LEFT!

Principe Malo - - Enchufla and slap the hand of the follow before moving on. Principe Bueno - - Enchufla and then kiss the hand of the follow before moving on. Setenta - - As shown. Setenta Complicado - - As shown. Setenta con Dos Manos - From a basic Guapea, this starts on the 7 count by the lead grabbing the follow's hand on the right. As the lead grabs the follow's hand on the right, they prep their partner on the left by putting their left hand inward, similar to a Setenta.

Then while the lead holds their right hand low, they rotate the follow on the left in a clockwise outside turn until wrapped. On the next eight count, the lead unravels the follow and then as the follow comes around anti-clockwise, the lead turns to the right under the follow's arm. The lead should now be facing the back of the follow with their right arm around their own waist holding the left arm of the follow behind them.

As the group starts to move forward with Arriba, the lead then hair combs the follow's right hand over their head and onto the follow's left shoulder. Dance until Dile Que No is called. Setenta Moderno - - Start like setenta, but lead the follower around behind and the lead steps in front with left hand up.

Lift hands up and lead the follow a round until behind again and the lead stands in front ducking under the right hand this time. The lead then ducks slightly and leads the follow to the right grabbing both the follows hands leading into a sacala, then duck under the follows arm and cross body back into neutral position.

Setenta Nuevo - - Start like setenta by putting the follow into a hammer lock on the first eight count. On the next eight count when unravelling the follow, the lead puts their left hand low and right hand high and continues to rotate to the right until the lead is in a hammer lock facing the follow on the right. The lead then pulls on the follows right hand and transfers them behind the lead on Once the follow is on the left, the lead is now in hammer lock with their right hand behind their back and facing the follow on their left, the lead does a turn to the right, holding their left hand high.

The lead should now be facing the follow in an open position. The lead now does a two handed enchufla and hair combs the follow. Setenta por Abajo - - Almost identical to what is shown in the video, except the ending is different - the lead faces into the circle and once the lead stands up and does the enchufla, it follows the same ending pattern as setenta starting at the 16second mark. Setenta y Dos - - Starts like setenta, but end it by hooking first the left elbow over the follow's left on 5 and then the right elbow on 7.

Then cross body lead back. Setenta y Tres - - Starts like setenta with the lead ending inside facing outward. On the next eight count, the lead then raises both hands and steps under, turning to the left to face the follow, ending with cross arms. The follow is then lead in an outside turn clockwise ending with a hair-comb on the right hand side, and cross body back to neutral. Setenta y Uno - - Similar to Setenta y dos, but hook just the right elbow on 7. Siete con Coca Cola - - Starts like siete, but spin the follow around while stepping around, then cross body back to neutral.

Siete Loco - - Starts with the Setenta style prep with the lead stopping the follow in a wrapped position on 1,2,3 and then spinning the follow with both hands.

Then cross body and prep with both arms into the center of the circle. Then spin back-to-back with both hands over the head, ending with the follow in a sweet heart position. Two sacalas ending with the right hand going in a hair-comb over the lead's head. Siete con Moderno - - Like siete, put your left hand into the circle but before the follow spins all the way out, flick the hand and grab the follow's left hand and put your right hand on the follow's back to stop the follow from spinning.

Then spin the follow back anti-clockwise and the haircomb the follow's arm over your shoulder and do a cross body. Siete Setenta - - Start like setenta but put the follow into a hammerlock along the edge of the circle. Then back-break, and pull the follow around until they are facing outward, and hook both arms in on 7.

On 1,2,3, unhook first left then right, then lead the follow around in a clockwise turn until they are behind with their left arm across the leads backs exactly like setenta complicado.

Sombrero Doble - - Start with a sombrero, then lead the follow back to the left into a quick reverse sombrero, the lead preps inward with the left hand and rotates the follow around back to back leading back to the right and then cross body back to neutral. Sombrero Con Mambo - - Start with a sombrero and when the follow is on the right, step out the mambo step.

The cross body the follow back to the left and then around your back and back to the left side. The follow keeps their hand around the mid-section of the lead. Sombrero con Patada - Like Sombero con mambo, starts with sombrero and the lead holds the follow on the right side.

Once in the Sombero, the lead and follow both jump forward, back then forward, back and kick, all following the clave beat. The lead kicks with their right and the follow with their left.

Then cross body back to neutral. Tumbao Francesa - - Enchufla, and then the lead pulls the follow past on the right with the follow's right arm. Then grab the left arm of the next follow and moves to the next follow, grabbing their right arm. Repeat until "Bota" is called, then only when the next follow presents their right arm, pull them behind and enchufla them back. Toma Corriente - - This move requires an even number of couples in the Rueda circle because the leads pair up.

Before this call is made, make sure you know who your other lead is by counting in twos, from the caller and the caller's pair to their right. This is important because it means you turn left or right to face your partner, depending on if you are up or downstream of them counter clockwise being "upstream", the direction the leads "swim".

When called, start with an enchufla and switch hands right to the follow's left , then reach with your left hand and grasp the left hand of the other lead. On the next eight count, back break and pull the follows under your joined arms making sure to raise your left hand so the follows do not have to duck.

On the next eight count, the leads pull past each other and turn to face their respective partner, but keep the hand hold and watch elbows. While still connected, the leads then spin the follows into a sweet heart move hand on the shoulder of the follow , then spin them out on the next eight count, throwing the follow's hand up in an arc, letting go of the other lead. The leads then move onto the next follow and cross body lead. Vacilala - - Spin the follow around to the right.

Vascilon pronounced "Bah-sa-lawn" - Called on 1, the lead presses the hand on the follow on 5 as normal and then immediately turns to the right to face the next follow who turns to the left on 6 and 7 and steps forward on 1.

Then continues to turn to the right to face original partner for pressing of hands on 5. A Bayamo en Coche - - Starts with setenta complicado, but don't let go of the right hand when pulling the follow behind and put them into a locked elbow on the lead's left on 1,2,3.

To get the elbow over the follow's elbow, the lead should keep their arm up, as if they were kissing their bicep. Lead and follow then walk forward on 5,6,7, back on 1,2,3, repeat and on second 5,6,7 lead turns to the right. Then enchufla, sacala with the right hand and pull the follow into a sweet heart move on the right and grab the lead's arm ahead of you.

Then walk around the circle for two eight counts. On the second eight count, push the follow outward on 5,6,7 and then pull the follow back on 1,2,3 back into the sweet heart and repeat twice, on the third time, pull the follow back and hook turn under the raised arm to face upstream to the right. Clap twice on 7,8, and pick up the next follow.

Ahorcala - - As shown. Akia - - Lead turns follow with two hand turn around from open position and cross body. Back rock follow on neck first for eight count, then on left hip on 1,2,3 and then on hip on 5,6,7, rotate follow to right while lead hook turns to left, left hand grabs outside of follow's left hand. Then enchufla and lead asks for left under right. Cross body, then hair comb lead first right hand and then left.

Algodon - Starts like Tunturnun where the follow is put into a hammerlock with the right hand in a hair comb. However, the hair-comb is a fake and the lead undoes the hair-comb and immediately does an enchufla with a hook turn. While doing a hook turn under the arms, the lead hops on one foot and pulls the follow from behind to the next lead on the left. The lead then continues onto the next lead as usual. Agamemnon - - As shown. Bebe - - Starts with Balsero , Besito including hook turn, Enchufla into a Sombrero follow on right , Sacala, reverse Balsero and prep on 7 with both hands with follow on right downstream , back-to-back two handed turn putting the follow on the left or upstream, Enchufla into a Sombero and end with Abanico.

Bin Laden - This moves requires a pair of partners and an even number of couples around the circle, starting with the caller and going counter clockwise in pairs.

Starts with an Enchufla and the lead does a hook turn, then the leads grab a left to left hold. The follows is then lead with a Sacala in parallel to the leads. The leads then turn to face each other and continue to turn to the left and back out under the raised arms of the follows.

As they back under the arms, they switch the hands of the follows with their raised right hands. The leads then lead the new follow in a outside turn and hook turn. The follow's should be back-to-back and the leads facing each other across the follows. Do an enchufla and switch to the other partner's lead, do a cross body and then do a Dame dos con dos with a counter-clockwise spin. Control - Start like Sombrero with right over left, spin follow to the right and then hook your right hand behind the head of the follow.

Then back-break sending the follow outward unwrapping the arms into a cross position. Then enchufla and keep the right arm low and wrap it around the follow's back, and the lead spins under the follow's left arm. As the follow goes under, keep the follow's arm straight, then back-break again and pull the follow back into a cross-body.

Conqueta con Meloa sp? Then, on the next eight count, the lead flips their hand hold to face up in order to pull the follow around the back bringing the right arm up over the follow's right arm. Leads should be facing into the circle at this point. Over the next eight count, the trick is to unfold the arms in front such that the lead can turn to the follow on the right and hold the left arm up and right arm down then spin to the right.

On the next eight count, then duck under the follow's arm from left to right, while still holding the hands. The trick here is to place your right hand on the follow's shoulder and bringing the hand on your back as high as possible.

Come back up and do an enchufla, ending in double hooks, then cross body back to neutral. Enchufla and the lead does a hook turn, then the leads grab a left to left hold. Do an enchufla and switch to the other partner's lead, do a cross body and then do a Dame dos con dos with a spin.

Corona Triple - Setenta, then unravel and hair comb the follow on 5,6,7. Then sacala and the lead hair combs themself by turning to the left and facing outward of the circle.

You came back the next class, and learned some more calls, and as you kept coming, your repertoire of moves to do in the rueda grew. Soon, you were going to clubs; you were doing this dance with other people who also knew it. And if you found yourself dancing out of town, you found, to your merriment, that you could also be part of a rueda with people you did not know because they were doing the same calls you had been taught.

All of this should definitely ring a bell with most of you. Now, I just commented on how you may have gotten started with rueda de casino as a way of bringing up some observations, all of which can be inferred from reading the previous paragraph:. It was a fun dance to do, and it was accessible, easy; it did not require a lot of technique to learn and memorize the calls. The calls you learned happened to be calls which even people from out of town knew, which allowed you to join in any rueda, anywhere.

In short, when it comes to rueda de casino, many people think that it was an easy and fun group dance that they could be a part of anywhere, because the calls were the same everywhere. Some, or all of these will hold true, depending on what dance group or academy you started with. The strictly rueda de casino group. This type group specializes in rueda de casino, not teaching their students that casino can also be done outside of a rueda format.

This type of group teaches not only to dance rueda de casino, but also casino outside of the rueda formation. We can further divide this group into two subcategories. A The group that teaches to dance the same moves in the rueda than in partner work, thus having the only difference between the two being the lack of a rueda. B The group that makes a distinction between formats by teaching different moves in the rueda and different moves during partner work.

There are some American salsa groups which focus on L. With the groups divided thus, we can now proceed to which observations usually apply to which group. Usually, all of the three observations apply to both Group 1 and Group 3.

Because Group 1 is a strictly rueda de casino group, they do not teach to dance outside of this formation Observation 1. For Group 3 the story is a bit different: The very nature of a rueda de casino dictates that every single person in that rueda has to be synchronized with the rest of the group, otherwise the calls do not come together. If the turn pattern requires everybody to work together and not mess up, and one person or couple makes a mistake, that is it for that move.

It simply does not coalesce. Group 1 and Group 3 usually solve this problem two ways:. To illustrate this point, take a look at this video.

I do not want to point fingers, but in this instance, I have to. There is no other way I can explain this observation without talking about these two dance academies from Miami: Salsa Lovers, and Salsa Racing. These two dance academies, the former led by Rene Gueits, and the latter by Henry Herrera, introduced casino to the U. These DVDs do not make a point to distinguish between casino and and casino done in a rueda formation. I would know because I watched them all. Because these were the only DVDs which reached a national and international audience, many people who were finding casino for the first time, thought that the dance was self-contained to the moves that the DVD taught.

Therefore, people thought all ruedas did or had the same moves. And at the same time, by focusing almost exclusively on moves which were 1-on-1 moves, but done in rueda format, they made it accessible to everybody. I will go into more detail about this apparently monolithic version of rueda de casino further down below. But for now let me talk about the last group: Most of the moves they do in the rueda are mostly out of those DVDs. The only exception is that this group has realized that the moves on the DVDs are not specifically confined to the rueda formation because, again, they are mostly 1-on-1 moves which can be done outside of it.

This is not to say that they do not teach rueda-specific moves, but it is not what they focus on, for the most part. With all of this said, we can conclude that Observation 1, logically, does not apply to them; though Observation 2 does to a certain extent because they keep the turn patterns accessible and simple.

Observation 3 is a definite because they are using the same moves from the DVDs. B is the better informed of the two, and by far the best type of group—though the minority— if you want to learn how to dance casino. This group has gone a step beyond Group 2. A in that they have realized that a number of many other things can be done in a rueda that cannot be done in 1-on-1 dancing—essentially that they do not have to be the same dance—and decided to go in-depth with the rueda formation, making their own rueda moves which only work for their rueda.

Typically, some of the members of this group —and definitely its top instructors—have traveled to Cuba and seen what rueda de casino is like there, realized that those DVDs they watched were only one small part of the picture, then returned home with that knowledge and made the necessary changes. One of the best group of this type in the U.

Take a look at this video. They are doing rueda de casino, and they are doing a rueda specific-move that they themselves came up with.

Of course, you may have noticed that I am personally biased to prefer Group 2. B; there is a reason for that. And that reason is: In this video you can really see what dancing in a rueda formation is really capable of doing.

Yes, there are many 1-on-1 moves here you can never get rid of those , but most of the turn patterns are rueda-specific. Take, for instance, the turn pattern which happens from 0: Imagine if instructors were to teach this move in their academies. They would spend a lot of time trying to make it come together because, again, everybody needs to get it right, and depending on the level of the students, the move may take more than one lesson to learn.

So, right then are there, you see why the question of accessibility becomes paramount to instructors who are trying to make a viable business out of a rueda de casino class and get people to come to it. That is what is accessible to most people. It is the fool-proof formula. You see, Cuba is not a country where you can sit down in front of your computer, log on to the Internet, and look up rueda moves that other people from Cuba are doing.

When rueda de casino traveled outside of Havana, the majority of people who came into contact with it were given only a certain number of moves, which, by the way, did not even get the same names. However, as the years passed, people began making moves of their own, and because there was no Internet at the time, no one had way of knowing the moves unless they personally saw them.

More importantly, however, people began making their own ruedas, with moves which were specific to them. Soon, ruedas flourished throughout the cities. In one city you could have different ruedas, composed of different people, all of them with their own signature moves. That is, none of them would look alike in their execution of casino within the rueda formation. Granted, they all shared some common moves like the Dame and the Enchufa—they had to.

But everything else was their own. Again, though they share some common moves, these ruedas are not the same. You cannot say that they are doing the same moves in the two ruedas. And of course they are not, because these two ruedas have their own signature moves which they came up with.

And yet, here in the States, in every single rueda you do, no matter if you are dancing in or out of town, the moves they call are, most of the time, the same: That is the perception that we have of rueda de casino outside of Cuba: But there is so much more that we could be doing with it. The imagery that I always like to use is that we have an orange in our hands but we are not squeezing it to get the juice out.

Rueda de casino is not supposed to be so monotone. It is not supposed to have the same moves called all the time. In fact, ruedas are not supposed to be all-inclusive. Ruedas are supposed to be exclusive. That is how you get a really good rueda going. The people in the rueda do not have to rely on simple calls but rather they could take everything that this formation has to offer to create something new with it. Turn patterns that would leave those watching open-mouthed and wondering how it is possible that they are doing that.

And let me tell you, you are missing out on a lot of cool things for perceiving it that way. Of course, making it harder and more exclusive means that not everybody would be able to join. And I get it: All those easy calls. My recommendation to people who really want to squeeze the juice out of the orange when it comes to rueda de casino is: And those moves you make, make them rueda-specific. That is the key to a great rueda de casino. Sounds harsh, I know, but when you find yourself having fun dancing your rueda in front of a group of people who are marveling how cool the whole thing looks, believe me, the reward is pretty kick-ass.

I love beginners, I really do. But because of their limited knowledge and maturity in rueda moves and etiquette, I also harken in my beginner classes that, whenever at the club and they see a group form a rueda, they should NOT just immediately assume that 1 they can handle what will be called in the rueda; and 2 that the people starting the rueda up intend for it to be an open, all-inclusive rueda.

I myself learned this lesson early on when I began learning how to dance Casino and in the rueda. I got told by a couple callers that I was not welcome in a particular rueda because they were going to call things that were beyond my abilities. Was I upset and embarrassed?

A little bit embarrassed but I understood and accepted their wishes completely. And you know what, it made sense.

Phones

Mini is a sub call and the same movement is performed, but don't actually clap. Festival de Fly - Starting on 1, clap up to the right, then down to the left, the in front, clap once, then twice more. The leads then cross arms and the follows pull their fists back on either side of their bodies and thrust their chest out. Everybody goes "huh" at the same time.

Then clap once and then three quick claps and cross body the follow on the right. La Havana - - Starts with a two handed enchufla with check, then repeat. On the third two handed enchufla, the lead does a hook turn under and pulls the follow's hands down in front while the lead faces into the circle.

The lead then lifts their right arm up, then the left and, turning to the right a bit, leads the follow into a hammer lock. Unfold the hammer lock with a back break and then momentarily hook the follow's left arm with the lead's right elbow. Cross body back to finish. La Isaura - - Enchufla and as the lead passed the follow on the left, continue onto the next follow on the left, cross body, then go to the follow two down, i.

The pattern is one to your left, two to your right and then one back to the original partner. Jardin - - Enchufla and grab the follow's left hand with right and walk into the circle. Then go under the arm raised by the lead on your left. Then wait for the Bota call then grab the hand of the follow on your left and enchufla the follow back into the slot, then cross body lead the follow. Make sure to "explode" the circle when doing bota. Juana la Cubana - - Exactly as shown, start with sombrero, then keep your left hand high and spin the follow around to your left putting your left hand on the follow's left shoulder.

Then pull the follow back to your right, keeping the follow's right hand low and fold it behind the follow's back and step up beside on the left. Put the follow's hand behind your head, then pull it out and sacala, and coming back into a sombrero. Cross body lead back to wapea. La Jenny - - Enchufla, switching hands, then on the next eight count, cross-body lead back to the left and pull the follow behind the lead like paseala.

After switching hands right to right , on the next eight count, pull the follow around in front and then spin the follow into a hammer lock with the follow's arm behind their back. At this point, the follow should be facing the lead with their right arm behind their back and the lead is facing downstream. On the next eight count, then cross body lead, and catch the follow by the left shoulder.

The lead should be facing inward slightly and the follow outward. On the next eight count, spin the follow to the clockwise and when they are facing the lead, the lead raises their arm and does a hook turn under it, ending up in the circle facing outward to the follow.

The lead then does a strong enchufla putting the follow momentarily in the circle before bringing the follow back into the slot on the right. La Pisa - - Enchufla and then lead and follow hold left and right hand respectively and lean back for 8 counts. Leonsio - - Start with Setenta, and like El Nudo, lead steps in front of follow and with left hand up, right hand low, turns to the right until facing into the circle and with arms, left over right, cross in front. On the next eight count, first raise the left on the right side of the body and then right hand on the left side , keeping the left up over the head as the lead turns to face the follow to the right.

The lead should now be in a hammer lock with their left arm behind, holding the follow's right hand. Then lead the follow until the lead is facing upstream counter-clockwise.

The trick here is to rotate locked with the follow degrees, until the lead is facing upstream, and then pull the follow the rest of the way behind. The lead then steps under their own arm and turns to the left to face the follow downstream. You have done this part right if you are in a position, to do a two handed enchufla with hook turn show them the L with the arms , and cross body the follow back to neutral. Mambo - On 5, hold the hands up and the lead step right on 5 left on 7 right on 1 left on 3 and then pushes off ready for the next eight count.

This move is called on beat 3, not the typical 1. Mambo Tipiando - Like Mambo, this start on 5 and the leads start their taps on the right and follows with their left. Two taps are done, i. Follows mirror the lead, tapping left, right, step left, cross and tap left, right, then back. The entire sequence of two taps, cross to the right, two taps and cross back is repeated twice and should end on a five with a hand press.

Mariposa - - enchufla then sacala and as the follow comes back, continue to pull them out of the way and grab the right hand of the next follow. Enchufla and hook turn and then enchufla and cross body back to neutral.

Melody - Enchufla and the lead stands in front and to the right of the follow, looking over their left shoulder at the follow.

The follow and lead, in a similar manner to Dos or Cubanito back rock, four times, then the lead picks up the next follow. Mezclado - - Leads turns to the follow on the right and catches the hand and brings the follow to the left, then catch the hand of the right hand follow again but spin the follow on the left nobody lets go! Leads then spin the follow on left into a hammer lock. Back out of the hammer lock, bring the arms up and hook in the elbows.

Make a little dip. Then back break again and do a hook turn under the follow's arms, then switch places again back into a sombrero. Noventa ninety - - as shown, the trick is to lift the left hand and step under it. Ochenta y uno - - enchufla and switch hands, lead the follow into a sacala with the right hand and as the follow comes back, hair comb the right hand over the follow's head.

Palmadas - Enchufla and like Enchufla con Mambo , the lead and follow stand next to each other and count out the follow steps to time - stomp left and right, then clap once, then stomp left and right again and clap two times. Lead picks up the follow they are facing. Parte el brazo - - Lead the follow clockwise and into the center of the circle. Lead puts right hand on follow's left shoulder and then, back stepping, grabs the back of the follows right hand and spins to the left, spinning the follow as well.

Then enchufla back into neutral. Parte el Brazo Complicado - - Similar to Parte el brazo, but after back stepping, put the follows arms behind their back when they face into the centre. Paseala - - Pull the follow behind your back.

Paseala y Complicate - - Starts with an enchufla, then two Paseala, then on the second one, the lead swings their right hand over their head and as the follow passes behind them, grabs the follow's left hand.

The lead should be in front of and to the left of the follow in a left to left and right to right hand hold. On the next eight count, the lead then pulls the follow forward and wraps the follow. One the next eight count, the follow is unwrapped and spun to the right, keep the left hand low behind the back and the right hand leading the turn.

To help the follow unwravel, the lead should turn when turning the follow. Then end in a sombrero facing into the circle. Patin - - Do an enchufla doble, then another one and lead goes into the center, put arms on the shoulders of the other leads and step with left foot behind right and then right behind left, then spin back out and grab the partner to your right not the same follower!!

When joining the other leads, to put left hand low and right hand high and to start with left behind right. Prima y Enredala - - Prima and catch the hand of the follow on the right, back step and pull the follow on your left into a counter clock wise spin.

While pulling the follow out, hair comb your right arm over your heard, face to your left. Then repeat, back step and rotate the follow on your left, etc. Once facing outward, continue to rotate to your left and back out under their arms. You should be backing out under the arms of the two follows and backing out of the circle. Take the hand of the follow on your right, stamp your foot, and lead the follow around your back and enchufla, then put the follow's hand on your shoulder and go the next follow on your LEFT!

Principe Malo - - Enchufla and slap the hand of the follow before moving on. Principe Bueno - - Enchufla and then kiss the hand of the follow before moving on. Setenta - - As shown. Setenta Complicado - - As shown. Setenta con Dos Manos - From a basic Guapea, this starts on the 7 count by the lead grabbing the follow's hand on the right. As the lead grabs the follow's hand on the right, they prep their partner on the left by putting their left hand inward, similar to a Setenta.

Then while the lead holds their right hand low, they rotate the follow on the left in a clockwise outside turn until wrapped. On the next eight count, the lead unravels the follow and then as the follow comes around anti-clockwise, the lead turns to the right under the follow's arm. The lead should now be facing the back of the follow with their right arm around their own waist holding the left arm of the follow behind them.

As the group starts to move forward with Arriba, the lead then hair combs the follow's right hand over their head and onto the follow's left shoulder.

Dance until Dile Que No is called. Setenta Moderno - - Start like setenta, but lead the follower around behind and the lead steps in front with left hand up.

Lift hands up and lead the follow a round until behind again and the lead stands in front ducking under the right hand this time. The lead then ducks slightly and leads the follow to the right grabbing both the follows hands leading into a sacala, then duck under the follows arm and cross body back into neutral position. Setenta Nuevo - - Start like setenta by putting the follow into a hammer lock on the first eight count.

On the next eight count when unravelling the follow, the lead puts their left hand low and right hand high and continues to rotate to the right until the lead is in a hammer lock facing the follow on the right. The lead then pulls on the follows right hand and transfers them behind the lead on Once the follow is on the left, the lead is now in hammer lock with their right hand behind their back and facing the follow on their left, the lead does a turn to the right, holding their left hand high.

The lead should now be facing the follow in an open position. The lead now does a two handed enchufla and hair combs the follow. Setenta por Abajo - - Almost identical to what is shown in the video, except the ending is different - the lead faces into the circle and once the lead stands up and does the enchufla, it follows the same ending pattern as setenta starting at the 16second mark.

Setenta y Dos - - Starts like setenta, but end it by hooking first the left elbow over the follow's left on 5 and then the right elbow on 7. Then cross body lead back. Setenta y Tres - - Starts like setenta with the lead ending inside facing outward.

On the next eight count, the lead then raises both hands and steps under, turning to the left to face the follow, ending with cross arms. The follow is then lead in an outside turn clockwise ending with a hair-comb on the right hand side, and cross body back to neutral. Setenta y Uno - - Similar to Setenta y dos, but hook just the right elbow on 7.

Siete con Coca Cola - - Starts like siete, but spin the follow around while stepping around, then cross body back to neutral. Siete Loco - - Starts with the Setenta style prep with the lead stopping the follow in a wrapped position on 1,2,3 and then spinning the follow with both hands.

Then cross body and prep with both arms into the center of the circle. Then spin back-to-back with both hands over the head, ending with the follow in a sweet heart position. Two sacalas ending with the right hand going in a hair-comb over the lead's head. Siete con Moderno - - Like siete, put your left hand into the circle but before the follow spins all the way out, flick the hand and grab the follow's left hand and put your right hand on the follow's back to stop the follow from spinning.

Then spin the follow back anti-clockwise and the haircomb the follow's arm over your shoulder and do a cross body. Siete Setenta - - Start like setenta but put the follow into a hammerlock along the edge of the circle. Then back-break, and pull the follow around until they are facing outward, and hook both arms in on 7. On 1,2,3, unhook first left then right, then lead the follow around in a clockwise turn until they are behind with their left arm across the leads backs exactly like setenta complicado.

Sombrero Doble - - Start with a sombrero, then lead the follow back to the left into a quick reverse sombrero, the lead preps inward with the left hand and rotates the follow around back to back leading back to the right and then cross body back to neutral. Sombrero Con Mambo - - Start with a sombrero and when the follow is on the right, step out the mambo step. The cross body the follow back to the left and then around your back and back to the left side.

The follow keeps their hand around the mid-section of the lead. Sombrero con Patada - Like Sombero con mambo, starts with sombrero and the lead holds the follow on the right side. Once in the Sombero, the lead and follow both jump forward, back then forward, back and kick, all following the clave beat. The lead kicks with their right and the follow with their left.

Then cross body back to neutral. Tumbao Francesa - - Enchufla, and then the lead pulls the follow past on the right with the follow's right arm. Then grab the left arm of the next follow and moves to the next follow, grabbing their right arm. Repeat until "Bota" is called, then only when the next follow presents their right arm, pull them behind and enchufla them back.

Toma Corriente - - This move requires an even number of couples in the Rueda circle because the leads pair up. Before this call is made, make sure you know who your other lead is by counting in twos, from the caller and the caller's pair to their right. This is important because it means you turn left or right to face your partner, depending on if you are up or downstream of them counter clockwise being "upstream", the direction the leads "swim". When called, start with an enchufla and switch hands right to the follow's left , then reach with your left hand and grasp the left hand of the other lead.

On the next eight count, back break and pull the follows under your joined arms making sure to raise your left hand so the follows do not have to duck. On the next eight count, the leads pull past each other and turn to face their respective partner, but keep the hand hold and watch elbows. While still connected, the leads then spin the follows into a sweet heart move hand on the shoulder of the follow , then spin them out on the next eight count, throwing the follow's hand up in an arc, letting go of the other lead.

The leads then move onto the next follow and cross body lead. Vacilala - - Spin the follow around to the right. Vascilon pronounced "Bah-sa-lawn" - Called on 1, the lead presses the hand on the follow on 5 as normal and then immediately turns to the right to face the next follow who turns to the left on 6 and 7 and steps forward on 1.

Then continues to turn to the right to face original partner for pressing of hands on 5. A Bayamo en Coche - - Starts with setenta complicado, but don't let go of the right hand when pulling the follow behind and put them into a locked elbow on the lead's left on 1,2,3.

To get the elbow over the follow's elbow, the lead should keep their arm up, as if they were kissing their bicep. Lead and follow then walk forward on 5,6,7, back on 1,2,3, repeat and on second 5,6,7 lead turns to the right. Then enchufla, sacala with the right hand and pull the follow into a sweet heart move on the right and grab the lead's arm ahead of you.

Then walk around the circle for two eight counts. On the second eight count, push the follow outward on 5,6,7 and then pull the follow back on 1,2,3 back into the sweet heart and repeat twice, on the third time, pull the follow back and hook turn under the raised arm to face upstream to the right.

Clap twice on 7,8, and pick up the next follow. Ahorcala - - As shown. Akia - - Lead turns follow with two hand turn around from open position and cross body. Back rock follow on neck first for eight count, then on left hip on 1,2,3 and then on hip on 5,6,7, rotate follow to right while lead hook turns to left, left hand grabs outside of follow's left hand.

Then enchufla and lead asks for left under right. Cross body, then hair comb lead first right hand and then left. In comparing it to learning a language, I feel like I learned to write first, then read and only last am I learning to speak. So, all that to say, keep up the good work because your blog is helping us all be better dancers!

You can get great dynamics and musicality doing simple stuff, and your dance will be interesting. This makes 0 sense, and has nothing to do with Rueda de Casino and Casino dancing. This really frustrated some of the more advanced dancers who do like dancing Casino in the Rueda format, but get bored of doing only simple moves time and time again.

My friends and I learned a lot from this series! There is really nothing that says ruedas should be anything. You can do with the rueda formation what you want, and people certainly do this. Some personal observations I would like to touch upon. But when they come into a rueda, it is clear by the swinging arms and large stomping steps that they are casino beginners.

We joke about this type of dancer: No wonder they offer this as a free class at a nightclub, because it seems like a salsa activity that everyone can participate in. Maybe it is because it is similar to country square dances or the old European court dances. From how group 1 teaches it, it appears simple and fun. A lot of people go to clubs and never get asked to dance or they ask several people to dance and they get turned down a lot. Some people want to standardize casino rueda calls, so you dance rueda in Nuremburg, Germany if you want.

Does it really matter if you know all the calls from a particular school in Nuremburg? Or from anywhere for the matter? Could a Santiago All Star jump in know all the calls? How would you even do that? An international body of casino rueda? A losing battle in my opinion. How would they even know that? How would they know a move that the guy from Holguin Forever made and named off the top of his head unless they were practicing with Holguin Forever in ?

There is so much inventiveness, vitality and ingenuity in the rueda moves from the Bailar Casino show that it could fill ten Salsa Congresses. To her, in other salsa styles moves are improvised with lots of spontaneity with passion and soul, etc. Again, she confuses rueda with Cuban style. I guess in her mind if two Cubans are at a salsa concert, love the music and want to dance, they must wait until another Cuban couple shows up before they can attempt any dance step.

But I guess from the ruedas she sees in North America, perhaps you can see her point of view. They need someone to call a move for them to dance. Dancing one-on-one requires too much thinking. Too many quick decisions. Well, someone needed to vent. I think, for casino to grow as a dance and be more respected it certainly needs to be taught more often as a partner dance rather than in the format of a rueda, where, as you mentioned, the decision making is taken away from the dancers.

You are commenting using your WordPress. You are commenting using your Twitter account. You are commenting using your Facebook account. Notify me of new comments via email. Son y Casino A blog for reflecting on son music and the dance of casino. On Rueda de Casino II: Rumbanana Salsa Group on August 14, at 8: Cathy Lamont on August 14, at Martin Elphinstone on August 14, at Jaclyn on February 22, at 8: Thanks so much for your kind comments.

I am glad you are finding the blog helpful! My thoughts on the matter. Joseph on October 9, at 7: Leave a Reply Cancel reply Enter your comment here Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: Email required Address never made public.

Like us on Facebook. Every 20 likes, a new post will be published! International Dance Festivals in Cuba: They Are for Everybody…Except Cubans. Entendiendo la diferencia y sus aplicaciones.

Is Salsa Really a Latin Dance? Understanding the Difference and Its Applications. La falacia de aprender a bailar casino "a lo cubano". Casino Dancing Videos from Cuba. Like Son y Casino on Facebook! Create a free website or blog at WordPress. J on What is the Difference Between…. Anna on Will Traveling to Cuba Actuall…. More like Tarrito afuera in normal Rueda than the familiar version of Dile que no. Normally called when stepping in an anti-clockwise circle i.

LE and FO retake the closed position with new partners and continue the Arriba anti-clockwise step. LEs and FOs remain facing in the same direction throughout. This move is quite different from the familiar Rueda version of Enchufla; the LE has to change position quite a lot to make it work. Lead the FO to half turn to her left so that she faces anti-clockwise around the Rueda. Lead the FO to half turn to her left so that she is back in the default position facing clockwise.

Start Dame — LE steps forwards under the high hands, releases hold and steps forwards to his new partner as both sidestep to the outside. LE steps forwards around her on the outside of the Rueda, displacing position anti-clockwise. Sidestep in towards the centre. Couples retake the closed position as they sidestep into the Rueda, recommencing the default in and out step.

A few straightforward turns from the closed position, when sidestepping in and out of the Rueda. The FO meanwhile has continued the basic sidestep. In order to make this turn possible LE and FO need to be in a very close hold; the LE needs to draw the FO in close, ensuring his right foot is between her feet, thighs touching. Called from the centre position beat 4 or 5. Rise from the bend turning to the right and opening the hold to return to the closed position. The basic step towards the centre in the closed position.

On the sidestep to the inside, lead the FO into a right cw half turn to face the LE again, and retake the closed position. The basic sidestep towards the centre in the closed position. As the FO completes the basic step, the LE turns left under his left arm to more or less face the FO and taps strongly behind with his right foot on beat 4. A free right turn for the FO. This may be called either when everyone is in the centre, giving 4 beats to prepare, or started immediately if the call is when positioned to the outside of the Rueda.

Retake the closed position and resume the basic sidestep towards the outside in the closed position. If Se queda stay is then called, maintain this hold and continue to sidestep in and out of the Rueda until a call of Se fue go , otherwise:. Repeat until a call of Se fue go.

Sidestep in and out with this hold; repeat until a call of Se fue go. Alternate FO and LE turns while sidestepping in and out, i. The LE turns to his right, reversing the turn, lowers the arm and couples retake the closed position. If you want to dance Rueda de Bachata as originally devised by Seemore Johnson and Christina Pujol, check out this video of an introductory class which they have put on Youtube. I will shortly be adding some notes on this to the blog, plus a description of Ocho and Ocho doble.

You are commenting using your WordPress. You are commenting using your Twitter account. You are commenting using your Facebook account. Notify me of new comments via email. Notify me of new posts via email. The basic step, and calling The default basic step in Rueda de Bachata is a sidestep in towards the centre in the Al centro position, followed by sidesteps to the outside.

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The lead then back rocks left then right, while leading the follow into a back rock on their right and left for an eight count. On the next eight count, the follow back rocks with the right foot again and then spins counter-clockwise to the right and is picked up for a cross body lead.

Leads can also spin before picking up the follow. Enrocate - - Two cross body leads in a row over two eight counts, going Evelyn de Cuba - - Starts with an enchfula doble and when stopping the follow the second time, the lead spins to the right and faces the follow. The lead should be right hand to right hand with the follow. Another enchufla, and the lead does a hook turn helps if the hand doing the enchufla is kept low and the lead pulls the follow behind their back to pass to next lead.

The lead then picks up the next follow to the right. Estrella Doble meaning two stars - Starts with an enchufla, then the leads walk into the center of the circle heading counter clockwise and put their left hands on the left shoulder of the lead ahead of them.

They then walk around the circle for two eight counts and on the 5,6,7 of the second eight count, the leads change direction back to clockwise and put their right hand on the right shoulder of the lead in front.

The follows move in the opposite direction and switch direction at the same time, again going the opposite direction. After changing directions, both leads and follows walk in their respective directions for another eight count and on the second eight count they should be close to their original partners. The leads then do a hook turn to the right and face their original partner, prepping to the right, in a right to right hand hold.

On the next eight count, the lead then turns the follow around clockwise in place and as the follow comes around to face the lead again, the lead does another hook turn but stops when facing upstream away from the follow.

The lead should be facing the next follow ahead of them and have, from behind them, the follow's right hand on the lead's right shoulder. On the next eight count, the lead then drops the right hand on the right side of their body and throws it up in a arc over their body, while immediately doing a cross body lead of the next follow upstream.

Fly - - On 5,6,7, jump to the right and clap killing the "fly". Mini is a sub call and the same movement is performed, but don't actually clap. Festival de Fly - Starting on 1, clap up to the right, then down to the left, the in front, clap once, then twice more. The leads then cross arms and the follows pull their fists back on either side of their bodies and thrust their chest out. Everybody goes "huh" at the same time.

Then clap once and then three quick claps and cross body the follow on the right. La Havana - - Starts with a two handed enchufla with check, then repeat. On the third two handed enchufla, the lead does a hook turn under and pulls the follow's hands down in front while the lead faces into the circle.

The lead then lifts their right arm up, then the left and, turning to the right a bit, leads the follow into a hammer lock. Unfold the hammer lock with a back break and then momentarily hook the follow's left arm with the lead's right elbow.

Cross body back to finish. La Isaura - - Enchufla and as the lead passed the follow on the left, continue onto the next follow on the left, cross body, then go to the follow two down, i. The pattern is one to your left, two to your right and then one back to the original partner. Jardin - - Enchufla and grab the follow's left hand with right and walk into the circle. Then go under the arm raised by the lead on your left.

Then wait for the Bota call then grab the hand of the follow on your left and enchufla the follow back into the slot, then cross body lead the follow. Make sure to "explode" the circle when doing bota. Juana la Cubana - - Exactly as shown, start with sombrero, then keep your left hand high and spin the follow around to your left putting your left hand on the follow's left shoulder. Then pull the follow back to your right, keeping the follow's right hand low and fold it behind the follow's back and step up beside on the left.

Put the follow's hand behind your head, then pull it out and sacala, and coming back into a sombrero. Cross body lead back to wapea. La Jenny - - Enchufla, switching hands, then on the next eight count, cross-body lead back to the left and pull the follow behind the lead like paseala. After switching hands right to right , on the next eight count, pull the follow around in front and then spin the follow into a hammer lock with the follow's arm behind their back. At this point, the follow should be facing the lead with their right arm behind their back and the lead is facing downstream.

On the next eight count, then cross body lead, and catch the follow by the left shoulder. The lead should be facing inward slightly and the follow outward. On the next eight count, spin the follow to the clockwise and when they are facing the lead, the lead raises their arm and does a hook turn under it, ending up in the circle facing outward to the follow.

The lead then does a strong enchufla putting the follow momentarily in the circle before bringing the follow back into the slot on the right. La Pisa - - Enchufla and then lead and follow hold left and right hand respectively and lean back for 8 counts. Leonsio - - Start with Setenta, and like El Nudo, lead steps in front of follow and with left hand up, right hand low, turns to the right until facing into the circle and with arms, left over right, cross in front.

On the next eight count, first raise the left on the right side of the body and then right hand on the left side , keeping the left up over the head as the lead turns to face the follow to the right. The lead should now be in a hammer lock with their left arm behind, holding the follow's right hand. Then lead the follow until the lead is facing upstream counter-clockwise.

The trick here is to rotate locked with the follow degrees, until the lead is facing upstream, and then pull the follow the rest of the way behind. The lead then steps under their own arm and turns to the left to face the follow downstream.

You have done this part right if you are in a position, to do a two handed enchufla with hook turn show them the L with the arms , and cross body the follow back to neutral. Mambo - On 5, hold the hands up and the lead step right on 5 left on 7 right on 1 left on 3 and then pushes off ready for the next eight count.

This move is called on beat 3, not the typical 1. Mambo Tipiando - Like Mambo, this start on 5 and the leads start their taps on the right and follows with their left. Two taps are done, i. Follows mirror the lead, tapping left, right, step left, cross and tap left, right, then back. The entire sequence of two taps, cross to the right, two taps and cross back is repeated twice and should end on a five with a hand press.

Mariposa - - enchufla then sacala and as the follow comes back, continue to pull them out of the way and grab the right hand of the next follow. Enchufla and hook turn and then enchufla and cross body back to neutral. Melody - Enchufla and the lead stands in front and to the right of the follow, looking over their left shoulder at the follow. The follow and lead, in a similar manner to Dos or Cubanito back rock, four times, then the lead picks up the next follow.

Mezclado - - Leads turns to the follow on the right and catches the hand and brings the follow to the left, then catch the hand of the right hand follow again but spin the follow on the left nobody lets go!

Leads then spin the follow on left into a hammer lock. Back out of the hammer lock, bring the arms up and hook in the elbows. Make a little dip. Then back break again and do a hook turn under the follow's arms, then switch places again back into a sombrero. Noventa ninety - - as shown, the trick is to lift the left hand and step under it. Ochenta y uno - - enchufla and switch hands, lead the follow into a sacala with the right hand and as the follow comes back, hair comb the right hand over the follow's head.

Palmadas - Enchufla and like Enchufla con Mambo , the lead and follow stand next to each other and count out the follow steps to time - stomp left and right, then clap once, then stomp left and right again and clap two times. Lead picks up the follow they are facing. Parte el brazo - - Lead the follow clockwise and into the center of the circle.

Lead puts right hand on follow's left shoulder and then, back stepping, grabs the back of the follows right hand and spins to the left, spinning the follow as well. Then enchufla back into neutral. Parte el Brazo Complicado - - Similar to Parte el brazo, but after back stepping, put the follows arms behind their back when they face into the centre. Paseala - - Pull the follow behind your back. Paseala y Complicate - - Starts with an enchufla, then two Paseala, then on the second one, the lead swings their right hand over their head and as the follow passes behind them, grabs the follow's left hand.

The lead should be in front of and to the left of the follow in a left to left and right to right hand hold. On the next eight count, the lead then pulls the follow forward and wraps the follow.

One the next eight count, the follow is unwrapped and spun to the right, keep the left hand low behind the back and the right hand leading the turn. To help the follow unwravel, the lead should turn when turning the follow.

Then end in a sombrero facing into the circle. Patin - - Do an enchufla doble, then another one and lead goes into the center, put arms on the shoulders of the other leads and step with left foot behind right and then right behind left, then spin back out and grab the partner to your right not the same follower!! When joining the other leads, to put left hand low and right hand high and to start with left behind right. Prima y Enredala - - Prima and catch the hand of the follow on the right, back step and pull the follow on your left into a counter clock wise spin.

While pulling the follow out, hair comb your right arm over your heard, face to your left. Then repeat, back step and rotate the follow on your left, etc. Once facing outward, continue to rotate to your left and back out under their arms. You should be backing out under the arms of the two follows and backing out of the circle. Take the hand of the follow on your right, stamp your foot, and lead the follow around your back and enchufla, then put the follow's hand on your shoulder and go the next follow on your LEFT!

Principe Malo - - Enchufla and slap the hand of the follow before moving on. Principe Bueno - - Enchufla and then kiss the hand of the follow before moving on. Setenta - - As shown. Setenta Complicado - - As shown.

Setenta con Dos Manos - From a basic Guapea, this starts on the 7 count by the lead grabbing the follow's hand on the right. As the lead grabs the follow's hand on the right, they prep their partner on the left by putting their left hand inward, similar to a Setenta. Then while the lead holds their right hand low, they rotate the follow on the left in a clockwise outside turn until wrapped.

On the next eight count, the lead unravels the follow and then as the follow comes around anti-clockwise, the lead turns to the right under the follow's arm.

The lead should now be facing the back of the follow with their right arm around their own waist holding the left arm of the follow behind them.

As the group starts to move forward with Arriba, the lead then hair combs the follow's right hand over their head and onto the follow's left shoulder. Dance until Dile Que No is called. Setenta Moderno - - Start like setenta, but lead the follower around behind and the lead steps in front with left hand up. Lift hands up and lead the follow a round until behind again and the lead stands in front ducking under the right hand this time.

The lead then ducks slightly and leads the follow to the right grabbing both the follows hands leading into a sacala, then duck under the follows arm and cross body back into neutral position. Setenta Nuevo - - Start like setenta by putting the follow into a hammer lock on the first eight count. On the next eight count when unravelling the follow, the lead puts their left hand low and right hand high and continues to rotate to the right until the lead is in a hammer lock facing the follow on the right.

The lead then pulls on the follows right hand and transfers them behind the lead on Once the follow is on the left, the lead is now in hammer lock with their right hand behind their back and facing the follow on their left, the lead does a turn to the right, holding their left hand high.

The lead should now be facing the follow in an open position. The lead now does a two handed enchufla and hair combs the follow. Setenta por Abajo - - Almost identical to what is shown in the video, except the ending is different - the lead faces into the circle and once the lead stands up and does the enchufla, it follows the same ending pattern as setenta starting at the 16second mark.

Setenta y Dos - - Starts like setenta, but end it by hooking first the left elbow over the follow's left on 5 and then the right elbow on 7. Then cross body lead back. Setenta y Tres - - Starts like setenta with the lead ending inside facing outward. On the next eight count, the lead then raises both hands and steps under, turning to the left to face the follow, ending with cross arms. The follow is then lead in an outside turn clockwise ending with a hair-comb on the right hand side, and cross body back to neutral.

Setenta y Uno - - Similar to Setenta y dos, but hook just the right elbow on 7. Siete con Coca Cola - - Starts like siete, but spin the follow around while stepping around, then cross body back to neutral.

Siete Loco - - Starts with the Setenta style prep with the lead stopping the follow in a wrapped position on 1,2,3 and then spinning the follow with both hands. Then cross body and prep with both arms into the center of the circle. Then spin back-to-back with both hands over the head, ending with the follow in a sweet heart position. Two sacalas ending with the right hand going in a hair-comb over the lead's head.

Siete con Moderno - - Like siete, put your left hand into the circle but before the follow spins all the way out, flick the hand and grab the follow's left hand and put your right hand on the follow's back to stop the follow from spinning.

Then spin the follow back anti-clockwise and the haircomb the follow's arm over your shoulder and do a cross body. Siete Setenta - - Start like setenta but put the follow into a hammerlock along the edge of the circle. Then back-break, and pull the follow around until they are facing outward, and hook both arms in on 7. On 1,2,3, unhook first left then right, then lead the follow around in a clockwise turn until they are behind with their left arm across the leads backs exactly like setenta complicado.

Sombrero Doble - - Start with a sombrero, then lead the follow back to the left into a quick reverse sombrero, the lead preps inward with the left hand and rotates the follow around back to back leading back to the right and then cross body back to neutral.

Sombrero Con Mambo - - Start with a sombrero and when the follow is on the right, step out the mambo step. The cross body the follow back to the left and then around your back and back to the left side. The follow keeps their hand around the mid-section of the lead. Sombrero con Patada - Like Sombero con mambo, starts with sombrero and the lead holds the follow on the right side.

Once in the Sombero, the lead and follow both jump forward, back then forward, back and kick, all following the clave beat. The lead kicks with their right and the follow with their left. Then cross body back to neutral. Tumbao Francesa - - Enchufla, and then the lead pulls the follow past on the right with the follow's right arm.

Then grab the left arm of the next follow and moves to the next follow, grabbing their right arm. Repeat until "Bota" is called, then only when the next follow presents their right arm, pull them behind and enchufla them back. Toma Corriente - - This move requires an even number of couples in the Rueda circle because the leads pair up. Before this call is made, make sure you know who your other lead is by counting in twos, from the caller and the caller's pair to their right. This is important because it means you turn left or right to face your partner, depending on if you are up or downstream of them counter clockwise being "upstream", the direction the leads "swim".

When called, start with an enchufla and switch hands right to the follow's left , then reach with your left hand and grasp the left hand of the other lead. On the next eight count, back break and pull the follows under your joined arms making sure to raise your left hand so the follows do not have to duck.

On the next eight count, the leads pull past each other and turn to face their respective partner, but keep the hand hold and watch elbows. While still connected, the leads then spin the follows into a sweet heart move hand on the shoulder of the follow , then spin them out on the next eight count, throwing the follow's hand up in an arc, letting go of the other lead.

The leads then move onto the next follow and cross body lead. Vacilala - - Spin the follow around to the right. Vascilon pronounced "Bah-sa-lawn" - Called on 1, the lead presses the hand on the follow on 5 as normal and then immediately turns to the right to face the next follow who turns to the left on 6 and 7 and steps forward on 1.

Then continues to turn to the right to face original partner for pressing of hands on 5. A Bayamo en Coche - - Starts with setenta complicado, but don't let go of the right hand when pulling the follow behind and put them into a locked elbow on the lead's left on 1,2,3.

To get the elbow over the follow's elbow, the lead should keep their arm up, as if they were kissing their bicep. Lead and follow then walk forward on 5,6,7, back on 1,2,3, repeat and on second 5,6,7 lead turns to the right. Then enchufla, sacala with the right hand and pull the follow into a sweet heart move on the right and grab the lead's arm ahead of you. Then walk around the circle for two eight counts. On the second eight count, push the follow outward on 5,6,7 and then pull the follow back on 1,2,3 back into the sweet heart and repeat twice, on the third time, pull the follow back and hook turn under the raised arm to face upstream to the right.

Clap twice on 7,8, and pick up the next follow. Ahorcala - - As shown. Akia - - Lead turns follow with two hand turn around from open position and cross body. Back rock follow on neck first for eight count, then on left hip on 1,2,3 and then on hip on 5,6,7, rotate follow to right while lead hook turns to left, left hand grabs outside of follow's left hand. Then enchufla and lead asks for left under right.

Cross body, then hair comb lead first right hand and then left. Algodon - Starts like Tunturnun where the follow is put into a hammerlock with the right hand in a hair comb. However, the hair-comb is a fake and the lead undoes the hair-comb and immediately does an enchufla with a hook turn.

While doing a hook turn under the arms, the lead hops on one foot and pulls the follow from behind to the next lead on the left. The lead then continues onto the next lead as usual. Agamemnon - - As shown. Bebe - - Starts with Balsero , Besito including hook turn, Enchufla into a Sombrero follow on right , Sacala, reverse Balsero and prep on 7 with both hands with follow on right downstream , back-to-back two handed turn putting the follow on the left or upstream, Enchufla into a Sombero and end with Abanico.

Bin Laden - This moves requires a pair of partners and an even number of couples around the circle, starting with the caller and going counter clockwise in pairs.

Starts with an Enchufla and the lead does a hook turn, then the leads grab a left to left hold. The follows is then lead with a Sacala in parallel to the leads. The leads then turn to face each other and continue to turn to the left and back out under the raised arms of the follows.

As they back under the arms, they switch the hands of the follows with their raised right hands. The leads then lead the new follow in a outside turn and hook turn. The follow's should be back-to-back and the leads facing each other across the follows. Do an enchufla and switch to the other partner's lead, do a cross body and then do a Dame dos con dos with a counter-clockwise spin.

Control - Start like Sombrero with right over left, spin follow to the right and then hook your right hand behind the head of the follow. Then back-break sending the follow outward unwrapping the arms into a cross position.

Then enchufla and keep the right arm low and wrap it around the follow's back, and the lead spins under the follow's left arm. As the follow goes under, keep the follow's arm straight, then back-break again and pull the follow back into a cross-body. Conqueta con Meloa sp? Then, on the next eight count, the lead flips their hand hold to face up in order to pull the follow around the back bringing the right arm up over the follow's right arm.

Leads should be facing into the circle at this point. Over the next eight count, the trick is to unfold the arms in front such that the lead can turn to the follow on the right and hold the left arm up and right arm down then spin to the right.

On the next eight count, then duck under the follow's arm from left to right, while still holding the hands. The trick here is to place your right hand on the follow's shoulder and bringing the hand on your back as high as possible. Come back up and do an enchufla, ending in double hooks, then cross body back to neutral.

Enchufla and the lead does a hook turn, then the leads grab a left to left hold. Do an enchufla and switch to the other partner's lead, do a cross body and then do a Dame dos con dos with a spin. Corona Triple - Setenta, then unravel and hair comb the follow on 5,6,7.

Then sacala and the lead hair combs themself by turning to the left and facing outward of the circle. Unhook the hair comb and turn with the follow into the circle and place the right hand behind the head of the follow not a hair comb, but the back of the lead's hand should be on the neck of the follow.

Then twist the follow under clockwise, by raising the left arm, keeping the right hand on the neck of the follow. The follow will need to duck under slightly. Then lead behind while the lead turns to the left to face outward. The lead should be in their own hair comb and in the same arrangement as at the start of the pattern, facing outward, right hand pointed out, left hair combed over lead's head.

Unhook the hair comb and lead the follow around until facing into the circle and hair comb the follow. Then lead the follow behind and start a mambo on 7, and while continuing mambo five steps in total , unhook the follow and lead hair combs themselves. Dame con Azucar - Starts off a dame, on count 7 8 when the lead is leaving the follow, they stand in front of the next follow to the left and roll the hips and upper body on On , jump to the left and cross body the next lead.

Dame con Estilo - 1 While in a left to right hand hold, lead the follow into the circle on 1,2 and spin back out on 3, then walk back out on 5, 6,7. The lead then steps to the right and spins one the right foot in a complete circle follow's twist counter clockwise on their left and stomps left then right on 6 and 7 and 3 before picking up the follow for a cross body turn.

Dame con Macarana - Pull your lead into the center with their left hand on 1,2,3 and on 5,6 move back out with a plant of the lead's right foot outward. The follow mirror's with a plant of their left foot. Then swivel right and left on the spot twice, then clap on 5 and spin on the right foot left for follows landing on 6 and 7 with stamping feet. Pick up the next lead. Dedo de Laso - Starts with a prima and catch the follow on the right, with the lead doing a fake left arm over the head.

Then sacala the follow, cross body and do El Doce, but on the ending enchufla, follow up with a cross body with a coca cola, ie. Do yet another coca cola and on the last one, the follow spins to the left and the lead spins counter clockwise to the left to pick up the next follow.

Juana la Cubana Complicado - Most of the move is a duplication of Juana la Cubana , however another sacala is added at the end. To start the complicado sacala, the lead's right hand is palm up, holding the follow's right hand.

The left holds the follow's left hand and leads the sacala. As the follow comes back from the centre of the circle, they are wrapped such that the follow and lead end up back to back. The lead then straighten's and pops their left arm straight and then lifts with the right hand, still palm up.

Like Juana La Cubana, the difference is that a second scala is done after the first and the follow is wrapped to the right with the lead's right hand. The trick is to keep the left arm low and the right arm high. The follow then ducks back under the arms and is lead around back behind the lead into an enchufla.

Juegos de Manos - Setenta then a two handed enchufla and with a momentary hair comb with the right hand over the head. Of course, making it harder and more exclusive means that not everybody would be able to join. And I get it: All those easy calls. My recommendation to people who really want to squeeze the juice out of the orange when it comes to rueda de casino is: And those moves you make, make them rueda-specific.

That is the key to a great rueda de casino. Sounds harsh, I know, but when you find yourself having fun dancing your rueda in front of a group of people who are marveling how cool the whole thing looks, believe me, the reward is pretty kick-ass. I love beginners, I really do. But because of their limited knowledge and maturity in rueda moves and etiquette, I also harken in my beginner classes that, whenever at the club and they see a group form a rueda, they should NOT just immediately assume that 1 they can handle what will be called in the rueda; and 2 that the people starting the rueda up intend for it to be an open, all-inclusive rueda.

I myself learned this lesson early on when I began learning how to dance Casino and in the rueda. I got told by a couple callers that I was not welcome in a particular rueda because they were going to call things that were beyond my abilities. Was I upset and embarrassed? A little bit embarrassed but I understood and accepted their wishes completely. And you know what, it made sense. As I watched they began calling turns, I realized within 30 seconds that this rueda was way beyond my knowledge and capabilities.

And that is why I explain to my students that before jumping into a rueda blindly, they should 1 observe it for a few moves and see how its moving and flowing; 2 if it looks manageable and they recognize what is happening, then maybe approach the rueda with respect and humility and ONLY with a partner!!

But thanks for pointing out these all too-overlooked issues that come up in rueda formations. You guys deserved to be mentioned! I agree with what you wrote and was also grateful to Pirito for detailing rueda de casino etiquette.

It would be totally out of place for a guy from another village, even one who knows the individual figures, to join in. Great analysis once again Daybert, thank-you! Improving at rueda de casino is a lot like improving at casino itself — you needs to keep practising and challenging yourself to do new and interesting things. And in rueda it needs to be practised as a group. That is also the difference between a living, evolving language like casino whether in rueda or partner format and other dance styles which have become entirely formulaic and leave no room for originality.

And I suppose that the parallels between teaching dance as communication between individuals and teaching Spanish language to your students are not lost on you. When you described your satisfaction in hearing your students use the grammatical rules and vocabulary you have taught to them to communicate between each other successfully it reminded me of how dance works at its best. I feel so, so humbled that people are taking the time to read what I write on my blog. But people, from all over the world, are reading that piece, then going to other pieces and reading them as well.

And then they are writing to me or calling me, commenting on the pieces, giving me feedback, sharing the pieces on their Facebook; and overall showing real interest in what I had to say.

It feels extremely gratifying. But more than anything, It feels extremely humbling to find that there are many a number of people who believe I have something important to say, and encourage me to keep doing it. Thank you all for the support, and all the time you have spent reading my pieces, commenting on them, sharing them, and giving me feedback. Thanks so much for writing this piece. I would add that what seems to be missing here in the states is a fourth group which really should be Group that teaches casino mainly as a partner dance and then supplements that with instruction on how to dance in a rueda formation.

Honestly, I feel like my own personal experience with casino dancing has been completely backwards. When I first saw people dancing in a rueda, I thought they were dancing salsa. In comparing it to learning a language, I feel like I learned to write first, then read and only last am I learning to speak. So, all that to say, keep up the good work because your blog is helping us all be better dancers!

You can get great dynamics and musicality doing simple stuff, and your dance will be interesting. This makes 0 sense, and has nothing to do with Rueda de Casino and Casino dancing.

This really frustrated some of the more advanced dancers who do like dancing Casino in the Rueda format, but get bored of doing only simple moves time and time again. My friends and I learned a lot from this series! There is really nothing that says ruedas should be anything. You can do with the rueda formation what you want, and people certainly do this.

Some personal observations I would like to touch upon. But when they come into a rueda, it is clear by the swinging arms and large stomping steps that they are casino beginners. We joke about this type of dancer: No wonder they offer this as a free class at a nightclub, because it seems like a salsa activity that everyone can participate in. Maybe it is because it is similar to country square dances or the old European court dances. From how group 1 teaches it, it appears simple and fun.

A lot of people go to clubs and never get asked to dance or they ask several people to dance and they get turned down a lot. Some people want to standardize casino rueda calls, so you dance rueda in Nuremburg, Germany if you want. Does it really matter if you know all the calls from a particular school in Nuremburg?

Or from anywhere for the matter? Could a Santiago All Star jump in know all the calls? How would you even do that? An international body of casino rueda? A losing battle in my opinion. How would they even know that? How would they know a move that the guy from Holguin Forever made and named off the top of his head unless they were practicing with Holguin Forever in ? There is so much inventiveness, vitality and ingenuity in the rueda moves from the Bailar Casino show that it could fill ten Salsa Congresses.

To her, in other salsa styles moves are improvised with lots of spontaneity with passion and soul, etc. Again, she confuses rueda with Cuban style. I guess in her mind if two Cubans are at a salsa concert, love the music and want to dance, they must wait until another Cuban couple shows up before they can attempt any dance step. But I guess from the ruedas she sees in North America, perhaps you can see her point of view.

They need someone to call a move for them to dance. Dancing one-on-one requires too much thinking. Too many quick decisions. Well, someone needed to vent. I think, for casino to grow as a dance and be more respected it certainly needs to be taught more often as a partner dance rather than in the format of a rueda, where, as you mentioned, the decision making is taken away from the dancers.

You are commenting using your WordPress. You are commenting using your Twitter account. You are commenting using your Facebook account. Notify me of new comments via email. Son y Casino A blog for reflecting on son music and the dance of casino. On Rueda de Casino II: Rumbanana Salsa Group on August 14, at 8: Cathy Lamont on August 14, at Martin Elphinstone on August 14, at Jaclyn on February 22, at 8: Thanks so much for your kind comments.

I am glad you are finding the blog helpful! My thoughts on the matter. Joseph on October 9, at 7: Leave a Reply Cancel reply Enter your comment here Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: Email required Address never made public. Like us on Facebook. Every 20 likes, a new post will be published! International Dance Festivals in Cuba: They Are for Everybody…Except Cubans.

Entendiendo la diferencia y sus aplicaciones. Is Salsa Really a Latin Dance? Understanding the Difference and Its Applications. La falacia de aprender a bailar casino "a lo cubano". Casino Dancing Videos from Cuba. Like Son y Casino on Facebook!

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