Lottery Scheme Casino Junket Meaning

Men playing cards Chinese love gambling. They have traditionally had no moral or religious qualms about betting money. Gambling rooms have typically been fixtures of Chinese communities. In many ways the stereotype that Chinese love gambling comes more from the behavior of Chinese in Hong Kong, Taiwan and Macau than in mainland China but as mainland Chinese have become more affluent their love of gambling seems also to have been reawakened.

Dicelike objects have been found in Chinese excavations dating back to B. The Song Dynasty Emperor Zhao Kuanggyin ordered habitual gamblers to have their hands cut off. Gambling is still technically illegal in China. It was one of the great social ills the Communists promised to eradicate.

During the Maoist era gambling was not widely practiced in part because ordinary Chinese had so little money. Since the economic reforms, gambling has come back with a vengeance. By some estimates an equal amount flows out of China illegally each year on gambling.

They may be suspicious of animal racing, because it is essentially self-regulated Even though a banner across from the track reads "Resolutely Implement the Central Government's Order Forbidding Gambling," thousands line up behind computerized betting windows.

The Chinese government signed a contract with Las Vegas contractor to build gambling casinos in an abandoned naval base near Macau.

Many Chinese see little difference between stock markets and casinos except that stock markets have a better rate of return. In the 90s the stock market became available and lottery tickets came out, and aftera sports lottery appeared. Chinese gamblers from various countries are a mainstay of casinos in Las Vegas, Macau, Australia and many other parts of the world. They want to Stake Casino Xanthinol Nicotinate one dollar to make one thousand dollars.

One Australian gambler in Hong Kong told teh Washinton Post, "people here seem to have a different attitude toward winning and losing than you and I. They take the rise and fall of fortune as a natural part of life. They love to bet. That's why its magic here. A Chinese-American commentator wrote in"The Chinaman will gamble with his last cent In his book John Chinaman at Homethe Rev. Your boy or servants bets as to whether you will order ham and eggs or fish for breakfast.

A rickshaw coolie lays a wager on which shaft on his vehicle a fly will light on first, which is not more foolish than for British boys to bet on horses which they have never seen. The fly at least Lottery Scheme Casino Junket Meaning be jockeyed. Some of the images of Chinese as a race of gamblers is a stereotype. Explaining why the Chinese in Macau and Singapore "are not so gambling-mad" as those in Hong Kong, a respected magazine editor told the Washington Post, "the reasons for the level of betting here are social and economic rather than cultural.

Mah-jongg is the most popular game in China. It is played throughout Asia and by some groups of elderly Jewish ladies in the United States. Resembling dominoes, it is usually played with four people and a pair of dice and heavy plastic tiles plus eight optional tiles with numbers, symbols and Chinese characters inscribed on them. The tiles make a very distinct sound when they are slapped on a table.

All over China, you can hear this sound: Mah-jongg has been played in China for centuries. Mah-jongg was banned in China during the Cultural Revolution.

Mah-jongg involves both luck and strategy. The rules and player goals are somewhat similar to those in Gin Rummy. Players draw and discard, trying Lottery Scheme Casino Junket Meaning get combinations that score points.

Different versions of the game are played in different places. The most popular version became popular in the city of Ningbo in the late 19th century. The slapping of tiles can be so loud and incessant, and players can play the game for such long periods of time that some players lose their hearing.

Hearing loss is such a problem that the Hong Kong government decided to cover employees of mah-jongg parlors with a fund used to compensate people for hearing loss in noisy occupations.

There are three suits in mah-jongg: Characters, Bamboos and Dots. Each suit has nine numbers.

Each number has four tiles. This means there are 36 Characters, 36 Dots and 36 Bamboos, for a total of suit tiles. There are also 28 honor tiles, comprised of 12 Dragon tiles four tiles for each of three different colored dragons, red, green and white and 16 Wind tiles four tiles for each of the four wind directions. There are three kinds of sets that players aim to get: Kongs are worth the most points.

Chows are worth nothing at all. Extra points are scored for going out first. There are also ways to double and triple the score. At the beginning of the game, each player starts with 2, points in counters. When a game is over each losing player has to give the winner his winning score in points from the counters.

The losing players also have to give points to players that have more points than them. When gambling each point had has a monetary value. The object of the mah-jongg is to collect high-scoring tiles.

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An elaborate ritual is used to select the seating arrangement. Once that is worked out all the tiles are turned face down and mixed up. Each player selects 34 tiles and stack them up in front of him without looking at them so each player has a wall in front of him composed of two rows of 17 tiles stacked on top of one another. The four walls are shoved together to form a sort of foundation.

Another elaborate ritual is used to make an opening in the foundation. Moving counterclockwise around the table, each player takes two pairs of tiles, until everyone has 12 tiles, and arranges them as they would with cards in a game of gun rummy. The players then take turns drawing new tiles and discarding old ones face up.

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The next player can take a face up tile or face down one. Only the last discard can be picked up, and it can only be picked up if the player can it use for a pung or a chow. If this is the case he exposes all the tiles by laying them down next to the wall.

This is known as the exposed hand.

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It scores less points than the concealed hand. It is possible to take a tile for a pung any time, and play continues with the next player. There are other rules about declaring kongs, getting extra tiles, making kongs from pungs and determining what to do when someone declare mah-jongg.

Mah-jongg and gambling go hand and hand. Explaining the link with gambling, one man told the Los Angeles Times, "There's got to be some money involved. Otherwise there's no fun. Businessmen often play with officials that always win.

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Mah-jongg is widely played for money outside of China. Filipino president Estrada lost millions of dollars, gambling on mah-jongg. Many people play mah-jongg in legal and illegal mah-jongg parlors that are filled Lottery Scheme Casino Junket Meaning smoking and cursing players, playing in tables packed closely to one another.

Because of its association with gambling, mah-jongg has always been associated with prostitutes and opium dens. Some admit Chinese only. Others are owned by Chinese and receive power and water from China. Casinos are illegal in China. Around 85 percent of the high rollers at Las Vegas are from Asia and increasingly from China. Chinese New Year is the biggest night of the year. The tables are laid out according to feng shui and Asian food is offered 24 hours a day.

Mark Six is a popular underground casino game in which players try to guess the numbers on colored ping pong balls pulled out of a transparent cylinder. A favorite game among Chinese is baccarat. Heaven-earth harmony is another popular Asian casino game in which a ping pong ball is dropped onto a grid with people betting in where it will land.

In Decemberthe Economist reported: Marble columns, gold decor and money are everywhere. But behind the glittering facades there are signs of something darker It is also fuelled by a stampede of nervous money fleeing the mainland. A look behind the scenes at Macau reveals a lot about Chinese corruption, and also about how scared many Chinese businessfolk are Hoyle Casino Indir the political climate back home.

The Economist, December 10, ]. Since when American casino operators first opened there, Macau has grown faster than a dealer sorts chips. Gaming revenues in the first 11 months of the year were 44 percent higher than in ; Macau is now four times bigger than Las Vegas. Because gambling is illegal in mainland China, Macau is their destination of choice.

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    A large number of these VIP gamblers are from Asia and the contraction of Macau's VIP gambling market has caused high-rollers from Mainland China to seek out new territories and a number of them are being brought over by junket operators. The Commonwealth Casino Commission (CCC) has. “Casino” means a facility licensed by the Commission to offer to the public both video lottery games and West . "Junket representative" means a person, other than the limited gaming facility licensee or the limited gaming Evidence of theft, fraud, fraudulent schemes, or other activity relating to promotional credits that. Among the topics discussed during Tuesday's Senate hearing on the $million money laundering scandal Missing: lottery ‎scheme.
  2. Men playing cards Chinese love gambling. They have traditionally had no moral or religious qualms about betting money. Gambling rooms have typically been fixtures of Chinese communities. In many ways the stereotype that Chinese love gambling comes more from the behavior of Chinese in Hong Kong, Taiwan and.:
    Recommendations issued by the FATF define criminal justice and regulatory measures that should be The emerging issue of high-seas cruise ship casinos and associated junkets is a challenge for regulators and law kind of lottery product and over 60 countries participate in the race and sports betting industry 7. Is there an English translation of the law available? Remote gambling, casino, gaming machines, horse race betting and lottery games are regulated. . by gross gaming revenue (GGR) for each of the following operations: special table gaming area; slot machines; junket and/or chipwashing operations. “charitable lottery” means a lottery organised by three or more persons . junket operator;. “junket visitor” means any person visiting a casino resort as a participant in a junket organised by a junket operator;. “licence” means any licence referred to in .. (b) any scheme, form or system of betting, whether mechanically.
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Such people do not need loans to play and offer better margins, because casinos do not need to pay junkets a cut. A high-speed railway being built from Guangzhou to Macau will make it easier to lure them.

Some casinos are also building venues with less floor space for blackjack and more for shops, theatres and restaurants. This may help placate the government in Beijing, which would rather see its citizens shop for jewellery than for a different currency. But as long as money feels nervous in China, it will seek a way out, and Macau is awfully convenient.

It is not just a passion for cards that brought more than A government official who has embezzled state funds, for example, may arrange to gamble in Macau through a junket. When he arrives, his chips are waiting for him. When he cashes out, his winnings are paid in Hong Kong dollars, which he can stash in a bank in Hong Kong or take farther afield. Some bypass junkets and instead use pawnshops and other stores, where they buy an item with yuan and promptly sell it back for Macanese pataca or Hong Kong dollarsless, of course, a generous cut for the shopkeeper.

The flow of money through Macau has caught the eye of the government in Beijing and may explain a temporary crackdown in on the number of Macau visas given to mainland Chinese. According to cables made public by WikiLeaks, an online troublemaker, others are also watching. The Los Angeles Times described a casino in Myanmar near the Chinese border that was housed in a warehouse-like building the size of two football fields and contained eight banks of roulette tables, rows of electronic blackjack machines and 12 pits for heaven-earth harmony.

Buses and vans in nearby town of Ruili ferry customers to the casino. There was no alcohol and almost no small talk. The gambling machines, chairs and tables were battered suggesting an operation than has been moved repeatedly. But if you have good connections you can stay in business even when the other are closed down. The government has shut down thousands of underground gambling parlors. In , the Chinese government launched a campaign to crack down on gambling in China and urged neighboring countries to help out.

We must stop this illegal activity. The move was prompted by embarrassing revelations about party cadres losing large amounts of public money at foreign casinos and local officials gambling during work hours at local tea houses. In , there were casinos across the border in Myanmar, Russia, North Korea, and Vietnam, most of them illegal. Under Chinese government campaign many were shut down.

As of April there were only 28 left. In Some cases the supplies of water and power were cut off to the towns that hosted the casinos. Thousands of underground betting parlors were shut down. Neighboring countries were told to close casinos at the border. A hour hotline was set up to receive tips on illegal gambling operations. Hundreds of thousands of gamblers were questioned or temporally detained. Tens of thousands were arrested, with the majority of them being released after paying a fine.

Indeed many places were shut down but they reopened after the authorities left and the campaign was over. Well-connected gambling houses even welcomed the campaign because it helped get rid of competitors. Many thought the crack down on gambling was absurd. China also loses an incredible amount of money overseas every year. Hu has said it makes more sense to have some kind of regulated gambling in China to keep the money in the country.

In it was home to 2, horses, of which about actually raced. Located outside Beijing, it covers acres and embraces two grass and one dirt track. The facility has seating for 40, but only drew around people per day its first season and once had about 1, people. The owners hoped they would fare better when the gaming laws are changed.

Only members of the Jockey Club could bet and there were no bookies. As of , the track conducted races twice a week during the racing season with a handful of races each of those days.

Punters complained that the returns were too low to make betting worthwhile. In , Tongshun was closed down by a court order after betters who lost money complained that gambling was taking place at the track. In January , the Chinese government announced the start of regular horse racing in the central city of Wuhan and said it was considering introducing betting on races there on an experimental basis in If the plan is approved it would mark the first time since the Communist Party took power in that real gambling on horse racing in China would be legal.

A test run of horse race betting was carried out in November at the China Speed Horse Open in Wuhan, signally a possible return of horse race gambling to China. Each spectator was allowed to place two bets for free, and winners were given lottery ticket that gave them a chance of winning small amounts of money. Both betting and racing were outlawed in , and only riders and owners have been allowed to make money from the sport since it re-emerged in the 90s. Tania Branigan, The Guardian, November 29, ].

Wuhan, the capital of Hubei province, was historically a center for racing and is keen to regain that status. This autumn a commercial college in the city launched a three-year racing course which requires students to learn how to ride and to organize meetings as well as to study the theory of the sport. According to the Changjiang Daily, individuals and groups could now apply to join a racing club and buy shares in the horses, allowing them to make money from races.

There were some other horse tracks but they were closed down. A race course opened in Guangzhou in was closed down in and labeled an unsatisfactory experiment because authorities could not prevent people from placing bets on the horses.

There are currently plans to open tracks in Hangzhou and Nanjing. Mainland China had two lotteries as of But most Chinese gamblers use illicit channels or head to the Happy Valley racecourse in Hong Kong or the casinos of Macau. Although they are part of China, the territories' special status means the mainland sees little of their vast profits. There are large number of lottery games in China. Extremely popular, they are allowed to exist and thrive because they are not technically regarded as gambling because they money the raise is supposed to help a worthy cause.

The laws are full of loop holes and there is no monitoring system. Many lotteries operate under the pretense of raising money for charity but most of profits goes into the pockets of those who run the lottery. Local governments usually get a cut and have few incentives to report irregularities. Bingo-style lotteries were introduced in Later, scratch lottery tickets with small prizes of two to 1, yuan were popular.

If players in one game got three symbols, they got a chance to a appear on a television game show and go for prizes up to , yuan. In Chinese lotteries, 55 percent of the receipts go to the players and the rest is supposed to go to finance projects for the handicapped, elderly and people in need. Authorities outlawed the practice of giving away televisions and refrigerators because too many of the ones given away were defective and winners complained.

In , the Chinese government introduced a national lottery as a way of generating revenues. Over 15 million tickets were sold in the first week. Smaller prizes were also awarded. Most of the money earned from the lottery was supposed to be spent on social welfare programs for laid off workers, disabled people and retirees.

It was launched partly to deter illegal betting on foreign soccer games. There are illegal soccer gambling networks that can accessed using the Internet that take in billions of dollars.

People in all walks of life have become obsessed with lotteries. The cost of living in China has gone sky-high. Everyone wants to get rich. What is the fastest path to wealth? These people believed is lottery games. Some people steal large amounts of money to finance their lottery obsession. The first got a seven year prison sentence.

The second one got 14 years. The guards lost nearly all the money on the lottery, were caught and sentenced to death. The heist was one of the biggest in Chinese history. The two guards were regarded as valued, reliable employees. Uncomfortable about what he had done he returned the money and made up the difference with his own money and swore never to take money again from the vault.

But within a few weeks the temptation of access to so much money proved to be impossible to resist. We were going to return the money after we won big. After taking several million dollars and suffering a bad losing streak the guards felt they had no choice but to take as much money as they could and make a run for it. They loaded at least five large cash-filled safety deposit boxes in a van in broad daylight.

When bank guards asked them what they were doing the gaurds said they were delivering money to a rich man who made a large withdrawal. When police broke into the vault a few days later they found a floor littered with lottery tickets. A nationwide manhunt was launched and they men were caught within a week. Fan tan , or pai gao , was a gambling hall fixtures of the old days.

It involved guessing the number of beans in a pot. The Korean owners of the pachinko parlors in Japan are angry with Chinese youths who have figured out a way to use magnets on the slot machine versions of pachinko games to win ever time. This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been authorized by the copyright owner.

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See Corruption See Hainan Island. Chinese Love of Gambling Chinese gamblers from various countries are a mainstay of casinos in Las Vegas, Macau, Australia and many other parts of the world. Tiles and Scoring in Mah-jongg There are three suits in mah-jongg: There are also 28 honor tiles, comprised of 12 Dragon tiles four tiles for each of three different colored dragons, red, green and white and 16 Wind tiles four tiles for each of the four wind directions There are three kinds of sets that players aim to get: Playing Mah-jongg The object of the mah-jongg is to collect high-scoring tiles.

Mah-jongg and Gambling Mah-jongg and gambling go hand and hand. Many Asian high rollers like to play baccarat. The Economist, December 10, ] Since when American casino operators first opened there, Macau has grown faster than a dealer sorts chips. Laundering Money in Macau Economist reported: An application for a certificate of approval must be made to the Secretary on the relevant standard form.

On receiving an application for a certificate of approval, the Secretary must investigate and inquire as the Secretary considers necessary to enable the Secretary to consider the application properly. The Police and any agency to whom the application is referred must inquire into and report to the Secretary on the applicant. The Secretary may refuse to grant an application if the applicant fails to provide information requested by the Secretary or refuses to have fingerprints or a photograph taken.

Fingerprints provided by the Secretary to the Police or a government agency must be returned to the Secretary for destruction under subsection 6. Fingerprints required by the Secretary must be destroyed by the Secretary immediately after the Secretary has made a decision as to whether or not to grant a certificate of approval.

In considering an application for a certificate of approval, the Secretary may take into account the following matters:. The Secretary must not grant an application unless he or she is satisfied that the applicant is a suitable person to work in a casino. This section applies if the Secretary proposes to refuse to grant an application for a certificate of approval.

The notice must invite the applicant to make submissions to the Secretary on the matter, either in person or in writing, within 15 working days after the date on which the notice is given to the applicant, or within any further period that the Secretary allows if an application for an extension is made within the time period specified in this subsection. If the applicant makes a submission to the Secretary within the time specified in subsection 3 , the Secretary must consider the submission before finally determining whether or not to grant the application.

If the Secretary grants an application for a certificate of approval, the Secretary must issue to the applicant a certificate of approval in the form, and containing the information, specified in regulations made under section The Secretary may permit an applicant for a certificate of approval to commence employment in the casino or to undertake services for the casino licence holder before the application is determined subject to any terms, conditions, and restrictions that the Secretary considers appropriate.

A constable or a gambling inspector may apply to the Secretary for an order—. If the Secretary is satisfied that there are grounds to consider suspending or cancelling a certificate of approval, the Secretary must—. If the holder of the certificate of approval requests a hearing or the Secretary decides to hold a hearing, the Secretary must—. The grounds on which the Secretary may make an order suspending or cancelling a certificate of approval are as follows:. The Secretary may suspend for up to 6 months, or cancel, a certificate of approval if the Secretary is satisfied that—.

The Secretary must send a copy of the order and the reasons for it to the holder of the certificate of approval and notify the holder of the right of appeal under section The Secretary may revoke the suspension of a certificate of approval if the Secretary is satisfied that the matters for which the suspension was imposed have been resolved where possible and that it would be just to revoke the suspension.

The holder of a certificate of approval must not, in relation to a casino in which he or she is employed or with which he or she is associated,—.

A person may appeal to the Gambling Commission against a decision of the Secretary to—. The Gambling Commission must give notice of its decision, with reasons, to both the person and the Secretary. The Governor-General may, by Order in Council, make regulations prescribing the days on, and the hours during, which a licensed casino may conduct casino gambling and the activities that may be undertaken.

Regulations made under subsection 3 must not override subsection 1 but may impose restrictions that are additional to the restrictions in that subsection. Despite the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act , an on-licence granted under that Act for a licensed casino must be treated as authorising the sale of alcohol for consumption in the casino while the casino is lawfully operated.

The holder of a casino licence must not charge or take a deposit, levy, or charge, directly or indirectly, to or from a person for the right to participate in casino gambling in the casino, except a commission or levy provided for in game rules. It makes no difference under subsection 1 that a deposit, levy, or charge is, or is claimed to be, refundable.

All books, records, and documents referred to in subsection 1 must be retained by the holder of the licence for 7 years after the completion of the last transaction to which they relate.

Subsection 4 and any other enactment or rule of law relating to the retention or destruction of books, records, and documents override subsection 3. The Secretary may impose conditions on an exemption or permission under subsection 2 for example, conditions relating to the security of the equipment or the period of its removal. The holder of a casino licence must not, without the written approval of the Secretary, enter into or be a party to a lease, contract, agreement, or arrangement whether written or unwritten with any other person for that person to lease, let, lend, or provide a thing or service in return for—.

The Secretary may, upon application, approve in writing a lease, contract, agreement, or arrangement referred to in subsection 1 if the Secretary considers that it is desirable or appropriate to do so in a particular case. The holder of a casino licence must, if directed by the Secretary to do so, provide to the Secretary, within the time stipulated by the Secretary, the information that the Secretary thinks fit with respect to any lease, contract, agreement, or arrangement in this section and sections and referred to as the agreement , written or unwritten, with any other person relating to the casino.

Without limiting subsection 1 , the Secretary may require the following information:. The holder of a casino licence must, if directed by the Secretary to do so, provide to the Secretary, within the time that may be stipulated by him or her, a copy of the agreement if it is in writing. If, upon a review of any information or document provided under this section, the Secretary is satisfied that the continuance of the agreement jeopardises the integrity of gambling at the casino, he or she must, without delay, issue to the licensee who is the party to the agreement a notice requiring the licensee to demonstrate why the agreement should not be terminated.

If the Secretary issues a notice, he or she must, at the same time, provide a copy to the other party to the agreement. The holder of a casino licence who receives a notice under section may respond to the Secretary under section 4 not later than the date stipulated under section 5. The other party may make submissions to the Secretary not later than that stipulated date. The Secretary must consider the response and any submissions made by the other party and,—.

The agreement in question, if not sooner terminated by the parties to the agreement, is terminated by force of this Act on the date specified in the direction.

The termination of the agreement does not affect the rights and obligations of the parties up to the time of termination. No liability for breach of the agreement attaches to a party or the Secretary by reason only of its termination by force of this Act. The manager or other principal officer of a bank in which the holder of a casino licence keeps and maintains an account for the casino must, if required in writing by the Secretary, provide to the Secretary a statement of account and any other information required by the Secretary, including copies of cheques or records relevant to the account.

No liability is incurred by the bank, the manager, or other principal officer for breach of trust or otherwise by reason only of providing information under this section. A gambling inspector must investigate, as soon as practicable, a complaint from a customer about the conduct of casino gambling. If, as a result of the investigation, the inspector is satisfied that any of the events in subsection 4 have occurred, the gambling inspector must provide a written report to the Secretary.

A complainant must be informed of the result of the investigation of his or her complaint and any consequent action taken. An authority given by the Gambling Commission must be for a period not exceeding 3 months. On granting an application, the Gambling Commission may impose reasonable conditions that the Gambling Commission thinks fit.

The holder of a temporary authority has the same duties, obligations, and liabilities as the holder of the licence to which the temporary authority relates. A society may engage a licensed promoter, for reward, to promote licensed class 3 gambling, which is not conducted regularly, on its behalf.

Reward paid to a licensed promoter under subsection 1 may be by way of remuneration, commission, or otherwise, but must not exceed the lesser of—. A society must not engage a licensed promoter unless their relationship is covered by an agreement that satisfies any regulation made under section In this section, conducted regularly has the same meaning as in section 28 4. In addition to any penalty that may be imposed under subsection 2 , a court may order that the licensed promoter forfeit to the Crown all reward paid to the licensed promoter by the society for promoting the class 3 gambling activity.

The Secretary may return an incomplete application, and the accompanying bond and any fee, to an applicant. A person, other than the Police, must lodge an objection to an application within 1 month after notice of the application is first published.

The Secretary must send a copy of the objection to the applicant within 7 days after the objection is lodged with the Secretary. As soon as practicable after receiving the application, the Secretary must approve the person nominated as the surety, or refuse to approve the person. The Secretary may demand immediate payment of the bond, and the approved surety must satisfy that demand, if the licensed promoter does 1 or more of the following:.

The Secretary must pay the bond received under subsection 1 into a bank account established to administer bonds. The administrator may apply the bond received from an approved surety to compensate a society or participants in the class 3 gambling activity who have suffered loss or damage in the circumstances set out in section 1 as a result of the acts or omissions of the licensed promoter.

If subsection 1 applies, the administrator must publish a notice twice, at intervals of not more than 14 days in a newspaper or newspapers that the administrator considers sufficient, inviting people to lodge claims with the administrator. The administrator must not pay a claim until 6 months after the second notice required under section is given. A person required to provide information under subsection 2 must provide the information as promptly as is reasonable in the circumstances.

The Secretary may take into account matters of a similar nature to those listed in subsection 2 that occurred outside New Zealand. The Secretary must also notify the Police if the Secretary takes any other action in respect of the licence.

Notice required under this section must be given to a senior constable ,—. If the Secretary decides to amend or revoke a condition or add a new condition to a licence, the Secretary must notify the licensed promoter of—. A licensed promoter must notify the Secretary and provide details of significant changes to the information supplied in, or accompanying, an application for a licence or an amendment to or renewal of a licence.

The Secretary may require the licensed promoter to apply for an amendment to the licence under section A or may invoke the suspension or cancellation provisions under section or as a result of the notification of changes. The Secretary must keep and maintain a register that records the name and contact details of licensed promoters. The register must be made available for inspection to constables and the public. A licensed promoter may make written submissions to the Secretary concerning the proposed suspension, cancellation, or refusal to renew within—.

If subsection 4 or subsection 5 applies, the Secretary must also notify the licensed promoter of—. Section 5 and 6 apply to the cancellation of a suspended licence.

The Gambling Commission must give notice of its decision, with reasons, to both the applicant or licensed promoter and to the Secretary. This section applies to all money raised by, or paid to, a licensed promoter including interest —. A licensed promoter must pay the money into a trust account, at a registered bank, operated either—. A licensed promoter must render an account to the society that sets out, in full, particulars of—.

A licensed promoter must pay all money held in the trust account on behalf of the society to the society—. The Secretary may, on the application of a person specified in subsection 2 , authorise the applicant or any other person to carry on the business of a licensed promoter for a period of up to 3 months.

An applicant must, after lodging the application with the Secretary, send a copy of it to the Police. If the application is granted, the person who is authorised to carry on the business of the licensed promoter must be treated as if the person were the licensed promoter.

The Secretary must, after granting a licence under this section, notify the Police in accordance with section The Police may apply to the Secretary for an authorisation under section 1 to be revoked if there are grounds to believe that—.

The Secretary may revoke the authorisation if the Secretary has good reason to believe that one or both of the grounds in subsection 1 have been established. In determining whether the grounds in subsection 1 have been established, the Secretary may take into account matters that occurred outside New Zealand. The revocation does not take effect until the Secretary has notified the person concerned. This section applies if a licensed promoter is unable or unwilling to complete the promotion of a class 3 gambling activity.

If subsection 1 applies, the society on whose behalf the promotion was undertaken may ask the Secretary to—. This section is subject to sections and The Governor-General may, by Order in Council, make regulations for all or any of the following purposes:.

The Governor-General may, on the recommendation of the Minister, appoint up to 5 Gambling Commissioners. A Gambling Commissioner is appointed for a term of up to 3 years as specified in the instrument of appointment. A person appointed as a Gambling Commissioner may hold that office concurrently with other appointments.

A Gambling Commissioner is not employed in the Government service for the purposes of the Government Superannuation Fund Act or the State services for the purposes of the State Sector Act only because the person is a Gambling Commissioner. All Gambling Commissioners must have, in the opinion of the Minister, the knowledge, skills, and experience to enable them to assist in undertaking the functions, powers, and responsibilities of the Gambling Commission.

A proposed Gambling Commissioner must disclose to the Minister, before appointment,—. The appointment of a Gambling Commissioner including the Chief Gambling Commissioner may be terminated by the Governor-General on the recommendation of the Minister for any reason justifying removal, including—. Before recommending termination, the Minister must give the Gambling Commissioner the reasons for the proposed termination and a reasonable opportunity to be heard and to make submissions.

The Minister must advise the Gambling Commissioner and give him or her reasons in writing for the termination. No compensation is payable to a Gambling Commissioner for termination of appointment or for loss of office. The Gambling Commission must make decisions independently of the Minister and the Secretary. Within the scope of its jurisdiction, and subject to this Act, the Gambling Commission including any division must be treated as if it were a Commission of Inquiry under the Commissions of Inquiry Act Powers conferred on the Gambling Commission by this subpart are additional to powers conferred on the Gambling Commission by the application of the Commissions of Inquiry Act The Chief Gambling Commissioner, a Gambling Commissioner, or a person providing services to the Gambling Commission under section is not liable—.

The Secretary may effect insurance for the Chief Gambling Commissioner, a Gambling Commissioner, or a person providing services to the Gambling Commission under section in relation to—. The Gambling Commission may appoint experts to assist the Gambling Commission to exercise its functions or powers, or to do any of the things specified in subsection 2.

The Gambling Commission may, as it thinks fit, sit as a division to carry out any of its functions under section If the Gambling Commission decides to sit as a division, the division must consist of up to 3 members, including the Chief Gambling Commissioner or a Gambling Commissioner acting on behalf of the Chief Gambling Commissioner. The Secretary must arrange the administrative services necessary for the Gambling Commission to perform its functions. The Secretary must ensure that staff allocated to perform administrative services for the Gambling Commission are separated, physically and operationally, from other staff responsible for policy, licensing, and compliance concerning gambling.

If the Gambling Commission requires a service from the Secretary that is not prescribed by this Act, the Chief Gambling Commissioner must report the requirement to the Minister. After consultation with the Secretary, the Minister may agree to the Secretary providing the services required by the Gambling Commission.

Information held by the Gambling Commission is to be treated as information of the Department. The Minister must, within 12 sitting days of receiving the annual report, present a copy of it to the House of Representatives. Every Gambling Commissioner is, while acting as such, an official within the meaning and for the purposes of Part 6 of the Crimes Act Schedule 3 applies to the Gambling Commission.

The High Court may reconsider afresh a matter that comes to it on appeal and may confirm, modify, or reverse a decision of the Gambling Commission or may direct the Gambling Commission to reconsider a decision. A person may appeal a decision of the High Court made on appeal under subsection 1 to the Court of Appeal—. To avoid doubt, a casino licence remains in force unless it expires or is surrendered until all appeals are decided, or the period for appeal expires.

A person who has a right to appeal to the Gambling Commission against 1 or more of the decisions specified in subsection 2 is not entitled to apply for judicial review of the decision unless—. In this section, apply for judicial review means—. The Crown Entities Act applies to the Lotteries Commission except to the extent that this Act expressly provides otherwise. The board of the Lotteries Commission consists of at least 2, and not more than 9, members. Schedule 4 applies to the Lotteries Commission, its board members, its procedures, its employees, and related matters.

Written directions given by the Minister may require the Lotteries Commission to vary or revoke any rule made under section or under previous gaming Acts, or to make a new rule under that section. The Minister must consult with the Lotteries Commission before giving a direction to it. As soon as practicable after giving a direction under this section, the Minister must—. The Lotteries Commission must give effect to a direction under subsection 2 despite section of the Crown Entities Act The Lotteries Commission may make rules not inconsistent with this Act for or with respect to the conduct and operation including the establishment and distribution of prize funds of New Zealand lotteries or any type of New Zealand lotteries.

Any rules made under this section take effect on and from the date of their notification in the Gazette , or any later date that is specified in the rules. Rules made under this section may authorise designs or specifications or other matters of detail to be determined by the Lotteries Commission, and may not be challenged on the ground that they leave such matters to the discretion of the Commission.

Despite subsection 4 , the Minister may, in writing to the Lotteries Commission, require that any design, specification, or other matter of detail be incorporated in rules and not left to the discretion of the Commission. In making any rules under this section, the Lotteries Commission must have regard to the desirability of—. Rules made under this section are a legislative instrument and a disallowable instrument for the purposes of the Legislation Act and must be presented to the House of Representatives under section 41 of that Act.

The Minister must cause a copy of the notice to be published in the Gazette. A notice given under this section is a disallowable instrument, but not a legislative instrument, for the purposes of the Legislation Act and must be presented to the House of Representatives under section 41 of that Act. The Minister may, from time to time, instruct the Lotteries Commission to promote a New Zealand lottery for any community purpose that the Minister thinks fit.

In this section, community purpose has the same meaning as in section An instruction under this section is a direction for the purposes of the Crown Entities Act The Lotteries Commission may, from time to time, determine additional prizes to be distributed in accordance with a New Zealand lottery to—.

Every selling agent of tickets in a New Zealand lottery must pay the proceeds that the agent accrues from the sale of tickets in the lottery, at times or intervals determined by the Lotteries Commission, into such account opened by the Commission as the Commission directs.

A selling agent may however deduct money from those proceeds as authorised by the Lotteries Commission. The Lotteries Commission must keep those proceeds in the account, or invest them in accordance with the provisions of the Trustee Act as to the investment of trust funds, until they are dealt with under section Any interest accruing from an investment under subsection 3 , or any proceeds from the realisation of such an investment, must be paid into the account referred to in subsection 1 and treated as part of the lottery proceeds on which the interest or realisation was accrued.

Every New Zealand lottery must be drawn and prizes allocated in a manner and under conditions determined by the Lotteries Commission. The Secretary and the Auditor-General must exercise the scrutiny that they determine necessary—. Except as provided in subsection 2 , the drawing of every New Zealand lottery must be open to the public. The Lotteries Commission may, from time to time, determine that the drawing of a particular type of New Zealand lottery is not to be open to the public.

In making such a determination, the Commission must have regard to the method and frequency of the drawing and the technology used in the drawing. Where the drawing of a New Zealand lottery is open to the public, the Lotteries Commission must publicly notify or announce, in any manner that it thinks fit,—.

Immediately after the drawing of any New Zealand lottery, the Lotteries Commission must—. In this section, official result means the result of drawing a New Zealand lottery under this Act. All the money that constitutes the prize fund of a New Zealand lottery must be paid into a lottery prize fund account. The money kept in the lottery prize fund account may be applied only towards the payment of prizes in New Zealand lotteries, except as provided in subsection 4. The Lotteries Commission may invest any money kept in the lottery prize fund account that is not immediately required for the payment of prizes—.

Any interest accruing from those investments, and any proceeds from the realisation of the investments,—. If, after the drawing of a lottery, no entitlement exists to a prize offered in the lottery, the amount of the prize must—. If the Lotteries Commission or, if appropriate, the selling agent is satisfied that the participant is entitled to the prize, the Commission or agent must pay the participant the amount of the prize out of the money constituting the prize fund for the lottery.

If the Lotteries Commission is not satisfied that a claiming participant is entitled to the prize claimed, the Commission must retain the amount of the prize in the lottery prize fund account until the question of entitlement is resolved. If it is determined that the entitlement exists, the Lotteries Commission must pay the amount of the prize in accordance with that determination. If it is determined that no entitlement exists, the Lotteries Commission must deal with the amount of the prize in accordance with section as if it were an unclaimed prize.

Despite anything in this section, no claim submitted to the Lotteries Commission under subsection 1 may be recognised if it is made later than 12 months after the drawing of the lottery to which it relates. A person is not entitled to the payment of interest in respect of a prize in a New Zealand lottery unless the Lotteries Commission had no reasonable grounds for—.

If any prize in a New Zealand lottery is not claimed within 12 months after the drawing of that lottery, or any prize in a New Zealand lottery that is an instant game is not claimed within 12 months after the date of closure of that instant game,—. The amount of the prize must then be dealt with as if it were part of the undistributed profits of New Zealand lotteries.

For the purposes of this section, the date of closure of a New Zealand lottery that is an instant game is—. All expenditure by the Lotteries Commission in any financial year must be in accordance with the approved estimate for that year, unless the Minister expressly approves otherwise. The Commission must also promptly supply to the Secretary for Internal Affairs the information needed by the Secretary to enable him or her to comply with section 1.

The Lotteries Commission may, for the purpose of assisting in the promotion, organisation, and conduct of New Zealand lotteries, or for other purposes that the Minister approves,—. The Lotteries Commission may invest any of its funds in accordance with the provisions of the Trustee Act as to the investment of trust funds. Except as provided in subsection 2 , the Lotteries Commission must, at the intervals or times that the Minister may direct, consistent with the estimate of income and expenditure approved by the Minister under section , pay its profits into such account opened under section as the Secretary directs.

The Minister may from time to time authorise the Lotteries Commission to retain the portion of its profits that the Minister thinks fit for the purposes of the Commission.

The financial statements that must be prepared by the Lotteries Commission under Part 4 of the Crown Entities Act must include its financial transactions relating to the proceeds from sales of tickets in New Zealand lotteries and every special purpose lottery promoted under section No body may be incorporated or registered under any enactment or in any other manner—.

No person other than the Lotteries Commission may, either alone or with any other person,—. A person who contravenes subsection 2 commits an offence and is liable on conviction to,—. No person other than the Lotteries Commission may, either alone or with any other person, promote, organise, or conduct any gambling—. A person who contravenes subsection 1 commits an offence and is liable on conviction to,—.

A person, body corporate, or department that has entered into an arrangement, agreement, or contract under section 17 of the Crown Entities Act to do anything as agent for the Lotteries Commission, or otherwise act on behalf of the Commission, in the promotion, organisation, or conduct of any New Zealand lottery must—.

Every statement proposed under subsection 1 must be audited by the Auditor-General, who, for that purpose, has and may exercise all his or her powers under the Public Audit Act The persons who were members or alternate members of the Lotteries Commission immediately before the commencement of this subpart are deemed to have been appointed as members or alternate members of the board of the Lotteries Commission, and continue in office as such for the remainder of the terms for which they were appointed as members or alternate members of the Lotteries Commission.

The general function of the Board is to determine the proportions in which the profits of New Zealand lotteries are allocated for distribution in accordance with this subpart. In addition to the powers specifically provided in this Act, the Board has all the powers that are necessary or expedient to enable it to perform its functions.

The Board may from time to time require the Secretary for Internal Affairs to prepare and forward to the Board a statement showing—.

A copy of every notification made under this section must be forwarded by the Secretary of the Board to the Secretary for Internal Affairs. A determination of the Board under this section may, by subsequent resolution, be varied or revoked and the Board must notify each distribution committee concerned of the subsequent resolution. Except as otherwise expressly provided in this subpart, the profits of New Zealand lotteries must be distributed, in accordance with the determinations of the distribution committees or the Minister, for community purposes only and for no other purpose.

For the purposes of this section, a distribution is for community purposes if it would contribute to the building of strong sustainable communities by encouraging or enabling—. A distribution for community purposes must be for a purpose that involves a community benefit of a public nature.

A distribution will not be treated as being for community purposes if it involves private pecuniary profit or gain for an individual or body, except to the extent that the profit or gain arises as a mere incident of the principal purpose or purposes of the distribution.

In considering those matters, a distribution committee or the Minister must, as appropriate, also have regard to the needs of older people, Pacific people and other ethnic communities, women, youth, and people with disabilities. Despite anything in this section, if the Minister instructs the Lotteries Commission to promote and conduct a New Zealand lottery for a particular purpose under section , the profits of the lottery must be expended for that purpose. Profits of New Zealand lotteries distributed in accordance with subsection 1 or expended in accordance with subsection 2 are not subject to section of the Crown Entities Act The Board may allocate from profits of New Zealand lotteries a specified sum of money for distribution by the Minister in response to applications referred to the Minister under section 2.

The Minister may distribute any such sum accordingly, on a qualifying application referred to the Minister under section 2 for the purposes set out in section The Board may allocate from the profits of New Zealand lotteries a specified sum of money for expenditure, in accordance with the terms of their statutes, by any of the following bodies:. For the purposes of this subpart, the Minister may, by notice in the Gazette , establish such number of distribution committees as he or she thinks fit.

A distribution committee consists of the number of persons that the Minister thinks fit, being not less than 3 nor more than 5 persons. The Minister may vary the purposes in respect of which any distribution committee has been established, and may disestablish any distribution committee. Part 2 of Schedule 5 applies in relation to the members and proceedings of distribution committees. Home Advanced search Browse About this site.

Search within this Act. By sections View whole 1. Add to web feed Order a commercial print. Reprint as at 1 September Note Changes authorised by subpart 2 of Part 2 of the Legislation Act have been made in this official reprint.

Note 4 at the end of this reprint provides a list of the amendments incorporated. Applications for class 4 venue licence. Renewal or amendment of class 4 venue licence. Suspension, cancellation, or refusal to amend or renew class 4 venue licence. Disabling gambling equipment and electronic monitoring of gaming machines. Particular limits on numbers of gaming machines.

Net proceeds and costs of class 4 gambling. Suspension, cancellation, and surrender of casino licence. Financial provisions relating to Lotteries Commission. Financial provisions relating to Board and distribution committees. Harm prevention and minimisation, enforcement, and other matters. Transitional, savings, and related provisions. Conditions that may attach to casino licence. New Zealand Lotteries Commission. New Zealand Lottery Grants Board and distribution committees.

A a member of a licensing trust elected in accordance with sections to of that Act or appointed under section of that Act; or. B a trustee of a community trust holding office under section of that Act or elected in accordance with sections to of that Act or appointed under section of that Act: B a trustee of a community trust holding office under section of that Act or elected in accordance with sections to of that Act or appointed under section of that Act; and.

New Zealand lottery — a means a form of gambling conducted by the Lotteries Commission under subpart 2 of Part 3 that is — i a lottery; or. Extended meaning of conduct. Meaning of net proceeds. Multi-terminal and multi-player gaming machines. Meaning of significant influence in casino.

Secretary may seek information to assess influence. Act binds the Crown. No increase in casino gambling. What is increase in casino gambling. Legality of gambling contracts. Providing credit for gambling prohibited. Advertising overseas gambling prohibited. Regulations may restrict or prohibit prizes. Retail value of non-cash prize must be stated. Sales promotion schemes authorised. Secretary may categorise gambling. Meaning of class 1 gambling. Meaning of class 2 gambling. Requirements for class 2 gambling.

Meaning of class 3 gambling. Requirements for class 3 gambling. Meaning of class 4 gambling. Requirements for class 4 gambling. Existing gaming machine licences and site approvals. Status of New Zealand Racing Board and racing clubs. Meaning of casino gambling. Continuing obligations of class 3 operator. Circumstances in which corporate society may apply net proceeds to authorised purpose.

Continuing obligations of class 4 operator. Application for class 4 venue licence. Secretary must investigate applicant for class 4 venue licence. Grant of class 4 venue licence. Grounds for granting class 4 venue licence. Determining suitability for class 4 venue licence. Form and content of class 4 venue agreement. Continuing obligations of corporate society in relation to class 4 venue licence. Content and conditions of class 4 venue licence. Significant changes in relation to class 4 venue licence must be notified.

Renewal of class 4 venue licence. Amending class 4 venue licence. Suspension or cancellation of class 4 venue licence. Procedure for suspending, cancelling, or refusing to amend or renew class 4 venue licence.

Consequences of suspension, cancellation, or refusal to amend or renew class 4 venue licence. Appeal to Gambling Commission regarding class 4 venue licence. Consequences of appeal regarding class 4 venue licence. Surrender of class 4 venue licence. Class 4 venue licence not transferable. Certain information must be displayed at class 4 venue. Obligation on disposal of gaming machines.

Prohibition on certain gaming machines in class 4 venue. Functions of electronic monitoring system. Secretary may select monitor. Register of class 4 venue licences must be maintained. Limit on number of gaming machines for venue with venue licence granted after commencement.

Ministerial discretion to permit more gaming machines if clubs merge. Ministerial discretion to permit more than 9 machines at certain class 4 venues. Power to issue, renew, or amend class 4 licence may be overridden. When territorial authority consent required. Application for territorial authority consent. Considering and determining application for territorial authority consent.

Territorial authority must adopt class 4 venue policy. Adoption and review of class 4 venue policy. Provision of information relating to class 4 venues in territorial authority district. Gaming machine profits must be banked. Interest, etc, on gaming machine profits. Management of gaming machine profits bank account.

Corporate society must apply or distribute net proceeds from class 4 gambling to or for authorised purpose. Corporate society must provide annual report to Secretary. Contents of annual report. Audit must be carried out in accordance with auditing and assurance standards. Clubs that operate gambling equipment at non-commercial class 4 venues must make financial statements available to members.

Other corporate societies must make financial statements available on Internet. Annual review of criteria for distribution of net proceeds. Publication requirements for corporate societies. Application or distribution of net proceeds when corporate society ceases class 4 gambling. Orders regarding application or distribution of net proceeds. Key persons must not be involved in certain activities or decisions. Regulations regarding application or distribution of net proceeds from class 4 gambling.

Payment of commission prohibited. Duty on grant recipients. Secretary may limit or exclude operating costs of corporate society. Secretary may investigate and audit licensees, grant recipients, management services providers, and businesses at class 4 venues. Certain persons must not seek, receive, or offer benefits with improper conditions attached.

Requirements for casino gambling. Racing betting and sports betting in casinos. Existing casino licences and agreements. Directions as to operating casinos. Gambling Commission must investigate application concerning casino licences. Mortgage or assignment of casino licence. Casino licence not transferable. Approval of casino venue agreement.

Renewal of casino venue licence. Application for renewal of casino venue licence. Process for determining applications for renewal. Information and matters to be considered. Expiry of casino venue licence. Amendment of casino licence. Conditions of casino licence. Procedure for specifying, varying, or revoking casino licence conditions.

Minimum operating standards in casino licences. Procedure for specifying, varying, or revoking minimum operating standards. Appeal to Gambling Commission. Suspension or cancellation of casino licence. Procedure for suspending or cancelling casino licence.

Notification of suspension and cancellation. Surrender of casino licence. Appeal against cancellation or suspension [Repealed]. Approval for associated persons required. Responsibilities of person who acquires significant influence without approval. Licensee to seek prior approval. Responsibility of licensee aware of person with significant influence. Review of associated persons by Secretary. Actions that may be taken by Gambling Commission. Existing certificates of approval.

Certain casino employees must be approved. Application for certificate of approval. Secretary must investigate application for certificate of approval. Information and matters that Secretary may take into account. Refusal of application for certificate of approval. Issue of certificate of approval. Expiry of certificate of approval. Commencement of duties before issue of certificate of approval.

Application for suspension or cancellation of certificate of approval. Making and revoking order suspending or cancelling certificate of approval. Secretary must notify casino. Surrender of certificate of approval. Restriction on holder of certificate of approval. Appeal to Gambling Commission regarding certificate of approval. Restricted hours of operation. On-licences under Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act Charges to enter and play not permitted. Books must be kept in casino venue.

Gambling equipment must be kept in casino venue. Prohibition on certain gaming machines in casino. Restriction on certain agreements. Procedure after issue of notice.

Consequences of termination of agreement. Bank may be required to provide information. Society may engage licensed promoter. Licensed promoter may only promote licensed class 3 gambling activity. Existing licensed promoter licences. Notice of licence application. Applicant must provide bond given by approved surety. When bond must be paid to Secretary. Secretary may appoint administrator.

Consideration and payment of claims. Secretary must notify Police if licence granted. Secretary must keep register of licensed promoters. Licensed promoter must have trust account. Trust account must be audited. Licensed promoter must render account to society. Revocation of temporary licence. Regulations relating to licensed promoters. Establishment of Gambling Commission. Termination of appointment of Gambling Commissioner.

Functions of Gambling Commission. Gambling Commission is Commission of Inquiry. Protection of Gambling Commission and Department. Gambling Commission may engage experts and receive wide evidence. Gambling Commission may sit in divisions.

machines

Each player selects 34 tiles and stack them up in front of him without looking at them so each player has a wall in front of him composed of two rows of 17 tiles stacked on top of one another. The four walls are shoved together to form a sort of foundation.

Another elaborate ritual is used to make an opening in the foundation. Moving counterclockwise around the table, each player takes two pairs of tiles, until everyone has 12 tiles, and arranges them as they would with cards in a game of gun rummy. The players then take turns drawing new tiles and discarding old ones face up. The next player can take a face up tile or face down one.

Only the last discard can be picked up, and it can only be picked up if the player can it use for a pung or a chow.

If this is the case he exposes all the tiles by laying them down next to the wall. This is known as the exposed hand. It scores less points than the concealed hand. It is possible to take a tile for a pung any time, and play continues with the next player. There are other rules about declaring kongs, getting extra tiles, making kongs from pungs and determining what to do when someone declare mah-jongg.

Mah-jongg and gambling go hand and hand. Explaining the link with gambling, one man told the Los Angeles Times, "There's got to be some money involved. Otherwise there's no fun. Businessmen often play with officials that always win.

Mah-jongg is widely played for money outside of China. Filipino president Estrada lost millions of dollars, gambling on mah-jongg. Many people play mah-jongg in legal and illegal mah-jongg parlors that are filled with smoking and cursing players, playing in tables packed closely to one another. Because of its association with gambling, mah-jongg has always been associated with prostitutes and opium dens.

Some admit Chinese only. Others are owned by Chinese and receive power and water from China. Casinos are illegal in China. Around 85 percent of the high rollers at Las Vegas are from Asia and increasingly from China. Chinese New Year is the biggest night of the year. The tables are laid out according to feng shui and Asian food is offered 24 hours a day. Mark Six is a popular underground casino game in which players try to guess the numbers on colored ping pong balls pulled out of a transparent cylinder.

A favorite game among Chinese is baccarat. Heaven-earth harmony is another popular Asian casino game in which a ping pong ball is dropped onto a grid with people betting in where it will land.

In December , the Economist reported: Marble columns, gold decor and money are everywhere. But behind the glittering facades there are signs of something darker It is also fuelled by a stampede of nervous money fleeing the mainland.

A look behind the scenes at Macau reveals a lot about Chinese corruption, and also about how scared many Chinese businessfolk are about the political climate back home. The Economist, December 10, ]. Since when American casino operators first opened there, Macau has grown faster than a dealer sorts chips.

Gaming revenues in the first 11 months of the year were 44 percent higher than in ; Macau is now four times bigger than Las Vegas. Because gambling is illegal in mainland China, Macau is their destination of choice. In Las Vegas casinos carry out background checks on gamblers and lend to them directly. At best there would be less money to lend. But junkets that could not collect debts might implode, leaving the casinos that had extended credit to them with big losses.

Many casino executives do not seem to know how much money they have lent to junkets, which makes it hard to assess the possible extent of defaults. Casino operators, like their customers, remain sanguine about future winnings.

According to analysts, no big junket has reported any issues with bad loans so far. A casino executive said recently that he worried less about a junket going under than he did about the implication of a Macanese official in a corruption scandal or a murder at a casino. You can bet that the casinos want to avoid that. Such people do not need loans to play and offer better margins, because casinos do not need to pay junkets a cut. A high-speed railway being built from Guangzhou to Macau will make it easier to lure them.

Some casinos are also building venues with less floor space for blackjack and more for shops, theatres and restaurants. This may help placate the government in Beijing, which would rather see its citizens shop for jewellery than for a different currency. But as long as money feels nervous in China, it will seek a way out, and Macau is awfully convenient.

It is not just a passion for cards that brought more than A government official who has embezzled state funds, for example, may arrange to gamble in Macau through a junket. When he arrives, his chips are waiting for him. When he cashes out, his winnings are paid in Hong Kong dollars, which he can stash in a bank in Hong Kong or take farther afield. Some bypass junkets and instead use pawnshops and other stores, where they buy an item with yuan and promptly sell it back for Macanese pataca or Hong Kong dollarsless, of course, a generous cut for the shopkeeper.

The flow of money through Macau has caught the eye of the government in Beijing and may explain a temporary crackdown in on the number of Macau visas given to mainland Chinese.

According to cables made public by WikiLeaks, an online troublemaker, others are also watching. The Los Angeles Times described a casino in Myanmar near the Chinese border that was housed in a warehouse-like building the size of two football fields and contained eight banks of roulette tables, rows of electronic blackjack machines and 12 pits for heaven-earth harmony. Buses and vans in nearby town of Ruili ferry customers to the casino. There was no alcohol and almost no small talk.

The gambling machines, chairs and tables were battered suggesting an operation than has been moved repeatedly. But if you have good connections you can stay in business even when the other are closed down. The government has shut down thousands of underground gambling parlors. In , the Chinese government launched a campaign to crack down on gambling in China and urged neighboring countries to help out.

We must stop this illegal activity. The move was prompted by embarrassing revelations about party cadres losing large amounts of public money at foreign casinos and local officials gambling during work hours at local tea houses. In , there were casinos across the border in Myanmar, Russia, North Korea, and Vietnam, most of them illegal.

Under Chinese government campaign many were shut down. As of April there were only 28 left. In Some cases the supplies of water and power were cut off to the towns that hosted the casinos. Thousands of underground betting parlors were shut down. Neighboring countries were told to close casinos at the border. A hour hotline was set up to receive tips on illegal gambling operations.

Hundreds of thousands of gamblers were questioned or temporally detained. Tens of thousands were arrested, with the majority of them being released after paying a fine.

Indeed many places were shut down but they reopened after the authorities left and the campaign was over. Well-connected gambling houses even welcomed the campaign because it helped get rid of competitors. Many thought the crack down on gambling was absurd. China also loses an incredible amount of money overseas every year. Hu has said it makes more sense to have some kind of regulated gambling in China to keep the money in the country.

In it was home to 2, horses, of which about actually raced. Located outside Beijing, it covers acres and embraces two grass and one dirt track. The facility has seating for 40, but only drew around people per day its first season and once had about 1, people.

The owners hoped they would fare better when the gaming laws are changed. Only members of the Jockey Club could bet and there were no bookies.

As of , the track conducted races twice a week during the racing season with a handful of races each of those days. Punters complained that the returns were too low to make betting worthwhile. In , Tongshun was closed down by a court order after betters who lost money complained that gambling was taking place at the track. In January , the Chinese government announced the start of regular horse racing in the central city of Wuhan and said it was considering introducing betting on races there on an experimental basis in If the plan is approved it would mark the first time since the Communist Party took power in that real gambling on horse racing in China would be legal.

A test run of horse race betting was carried out in November at the China Speed Horse Open in Wuhan, signally a possible return of horse race gambling to China. Each spectator was allowed to place two bets for free, and winners were given lottery ticket that gave them a chance of winning small amounts of money. Both betting and racing were outlawed in , and only riders and owners have been allowed to make money from the sport since it re-emerged in the 90s.

Tania Branigan, The Guardian, November 29, ]. Wuhan, the capital of Hubei province, was historically a center for racing and is keen to regain that status. This autumn a commercial college in the city launched a three-year racing course which requires students to learn how to ride and to organize meetings as well as to study the theory of the sport.

According to the Changjiang Daily, individuals and groups could now apply to join a racing club and buy shares in the horses, allowing them to make money from races.

There were some other horse tracks but they were closed down. A race course opened in Guangzhou in was closed down in and labeled an unsatisfactory experiment because authorities could not prevent people from placing bets on the horses.

There are currently plans to open tracks in Hangzhou and Nanjing. Mainland China had two lotteries as of But most Chinese gamblers use illicit channels or head to the Happy Valley racecourse in Hong Kong or the casinos of Macau.

Although they are part of China, the territories' special status means the mainland sees little of their vast profits. There are large number of lottery games in China. Extremely popular, they are allowed to exist and thrive because they are not technically regarded as gambling because they money the raise is supposed to help a worthy cause.

The laws are full of loop holes and there is no monitoring system. Many lotteries operate under the pretense of raising money for charity but most of profits goes into the pockets of those who run the lottery.

Local governments usually get a cut and have few incentives to report irregularities. Bingo-style lotteries were introduced in Later, scratch lottery tickets with small prizes of two to 1, yuan were popular. If players in one game got three symbols, they got a chance to a appear on a television game show and go for prizes up to , yuan. The holder of a certificate of approval must not, in relation to a casino in which he or she is employed or with which he or she is associated,—. A person may appeal to the Gambling Commission against a decision of the Secretary to—.

The Gambling Commission must give notice of its decision, with reasons, to both the person and the Secretary. The Governor-General may, by Order in Council, make regulations prescribing the days on, and the hours during, which a licensed casino may conduct casino gambling and the activities that may be undertaken. Regulations made under subsection 3 must not override subsection 1 but may impose restrictions that are additional to the restrictions in that subsection. Despite the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act , an on-licence granted under that Act for a licensed casino must be treated as authorising the sale of alcohol for consumption in the casino while the casino is lawfully operated.

The holder of a casino licence must not charge or take a deposit, levy, or charge, directly or indirectly, to or from a person for the right to participate in casino gambling in the casino, except a commission or levy provided for in game rules. It makes no difference under subsection 1 that a deposit, levy, or charge is, or is claimed to be, refundable.

All books, records, and documents referred to in subsection 1 must be retained by the holder of the licence for 7 years after the completion of the last transaction to which they relate.

Subsection 4 and any other enactment or rule of law relating to the retention or destruction of books, records, and documents override subsection 3. The Secretary may impose conditions on an exemption or permission under subsection 2 for example, conditions relating to the security of the equipment or the period of its removal. The holder of a casino licence must not, without the written approval of the Secretary, enter into or be a party to a lease, contract, agreement, or arrangement whether written or unwritten with any other person for that person to lease, let, lend, or provide a thing or service in return for—.

The Secretary may, upon application, approve in writing a lease, contract, agreement, or arrangement referred to in subsection 1 if the Secretary considers that it is desirable or appropriate to do so in a particular case. The holder of a casino licence must, if directed by the Secretary to do so, provide to the Secretary, within the time stipulated by the Secretary, the information that the Secretary thinks fit with respect to any lease, contract, agreement, or arrangement in this section and sections and referred to as the agreement , written or unwritten, with any other person relating to the casino.

Without limiting subsection 1 , the Secretary may require the following information:. The holder of a casino licence must, if directed by the Secretary to do so, provide to the Secretary, within the time that may be stipulated by him or her, a copy of the agreement if it is in writing.

If, upon a review of any information or document provided under this section, the Secretary is satisfied that the continuance of the agreement jeopardises the integrity of gambling at the casino, he or she must, without delay, issue to the licensee who is the party to the agreement a notice requiring the licensee to demonstrate why the agreement should not be terminated. If the Secretary issues a notice, he or she must, at the same time, provide a copy to the other party to the agreement.

The holder of a casino licence who receives a notice under section may respond to the Secretary under section 4 not later than the date stipulated under section 5. The other party may make submissions to the Secretary not later than that stipulated date. The Secretary must consider the response and any submissions made by the other party and,—. The agreement in question, if not sooner terminated by the parties to the agreement, is terminated by force of this Act on the date specified in the direction.

The termination of the agreement does not affect the rights and obligations of the parties up to the time of termination. No liability for breach of the agreement attaches to a party or the Secretary by reason only of its termination by force of this Act. The manager or other principal officer of a bank in which the holder of a casino licence keeps and maintains an account for the casino must, if required in writing by the Secretary, provide to the Secretary a statement of account and any other information required by the Secretary, including copies of cheques or records relevant to the account.

No liability is incurred by the bank, the manager, or other principal officer for breach of trust or otherwise by reason only of providing information under this section. A gambling inspector must investigate, as soon as practicable, a complaint from a customer about the conduct of casino gambling. If, as a result of the investigation, the inspector is satisfied that any of the events in subsection 4 have occurred, the gambling inspector must provide a written report to the Secretary.

A complainant must be informed of the result of the investigation of his or her complaint and any consequent action taken. An authority given by the Gambling Commission must be for a period not exceeding 3 months. On granting an application, the Gambling Commission may impose reasonable conditions that the Gambling Commission thinks fit.

The holder of a temporary authority has the same duties, obligations, and liabilities as the holder of the licence to which the temporary authority relates. A society may engage a licensed promoter, for reward, to promote licensed class 3 gambling, which is not conducted regularly, on its behalf. Reward paid to a licensed promoter under subsection 1 may be by way of remuneration, commission, or otherwise, but must not exceed the lesser of—.

A society must not engage a licensed promoter unless their relationship is covered by an agreement that satisfies any regulation made under section In this section, conducted regularly has the same meaning as in section 28 4.

In addition to any penalty that may be imposed under subsection 2 , a court may order that the licensed promoter forfeit to the Crown all reward paid to the licensed promoter by the society for promoting the class 3 gambling activity. The Secretary may return an incomplete application, and the accompanying bond and any fee, to an applicant. A person, other than the Police, must lodge an objection to an application within 1 month after notice of the application is first published.

The Secretary must send a copy of the objection to the applicant within 7 days after the objection is lodged with the Secretary. As soon as practicable after receiving the application, the Secretary must approve the person nominated as the surety, or refuse to approve the person. The Secretary may demand immediate payment of the bond, and the approved surety must satisfy that demand, if the licensed promoter does 1 or more of the following:. The Secretary must pay the bond received under subsection 1 into a bank account established to administer bonds.

The administrator may apply the bond received from an approved surety to compensate a society or participants in the class 3 gambling activity who have suffered loss or damage in the circumstances set out in section 1 as a result of the acts or omissions of the licensed promoter. If subsection 1 applies, the administrator must publish a notice twice, at intervals of not more than 14 days in a newspaper or newspapers that the administrator considers sufficient, inviting people to lodge claims with the administrator.

The administrator must not pay a claim until 6 months after the second notice required under section is given. A person required to provide information under subsection 2 must provide the information as promptly as is reasonable in the circumstances. The Secretary may take into account matters of a similar nature to those listed in subsection 2 that occurred outside New Zealand.

The Secretary must also notify the Police if the Secretary takes any other action in respect of the licence. Notice required under this section must be given to a senior constable ,—.

If the Secretary decides to amend or revoke a condition or add a new condition to a licence, the Secretary must notify the licensed promoter of—. A licensed promoter must notify the Secretary and provide details of significant changes to the information supplied in, or accompanying, an application for a licence or an amendment to or renewal of a licence.

The Secretary may require the licensed promoter to apply for an amendment to the licence under section A or may invoke the suspension or cancellation provisions under section or as a result of the notification of changes.

The Secretary must keep and maintain a register that records the name and contact details of licensed promoters. The register must be made available for inspection to constables and the public.

A licensed promoter may make written submissions to the Secretary concerning the proposed suspension, cancellation, or refusal to renew within—. If subsection 4 or subsection 5 applies, the Secretary must also notify the licensed promoter of—.

Section 5 and 6 apply to the cancellation of a suspended licence. The Gambling Commission must give notice of its decision, with reasons, to both the applicant or licensed promoter and to the Secretary. This section applies to all money raised by, or paid to, a licensed promoter including interest —. A licensed promoter must pay the money into a trust account, at a registered bank, operated either—.

A licensed promoter must render an account to the society that sets out, in full, particulars of—. A licensed promoter must pay all money held in the trust account on behalf of the society to the society—. The Secretary may, on the application of a person specified in subsection 2 , authorise the applicant or any other person to carry on the business of a licensed promoter for a period of up to 3 months.

An applicant must, after lodging the application with the Secretary, send a copy of it to the Police. If the application is granted, the person who is authorised to carry on the business of the licensed promoter must be treated as if the person were the licensed promoter. The Secretary must, after granting a licence under this section, notify the Police in accordance with section The Police may apply to the Secretary for an authorisation under section 1 to be revoked if there are grounds to believe that—.

The Secretary may revoke the authorisation if the Secretary has good reason to believe that one or both of the grounds in subsection 1 have been established. In determining whether the grounds in subsection 1 have been established, the Secretary may take into account matters that occurred outside New Zealand. The revocation does not take effect until the Secretary has notified the person concerned.

This section applies if a licensed promoter is unable or unwilling to complete the promotion of a class 3 gambling activity. If subsection 1 applies, the society on whose behalf the promotion was undertaken may ask the Secretary to—. This section is subject to sections and The Governor-General may, by Order in Council, make regulations for all or any of the following purposes:.

The Governor-General may, on the recommendation of the Minister, appoint up to 5 Gambling Commissioners. A Gambling Commissioner is appointed for a term of up to 3 years as specified in the instrument of appointment. A person appointed as a Gambling Commissioner may hold that office concurrently with other appointments. A Gambling Commissioner is not employed in the Government service for the purposes of the Government Superannuation Fund Act or the State services for the purposes of the State Sector Act only because the person is a Gambling Commissioner.

All Gambling Commissioners must have, in the opinion of the Minister, the knowledge, skills, and experience to enable them to assist in undertaking the functions, powers, and responsibilities of the Gambling Commission. A proposed Gambling Commissioner must disclose to the Minister, before appointment,—. The appointment of a Gambling Commissioner including the Chief Gambling Commissioner may be terminated by the Governor-General on the recommendation of the Minister for any reason justifying removal, including—.

Before recommending termination, the Minister must give the Gambling Commissioner the reasons for the proposed termination and a reasonable opportunity to be heard and to make submissions. The Minister must advise the Gambling Commissioner and give him or her reasons in writing for the termination. No compensation is payable to a Gambling Commissioner for termination of appointment or for loss of office. The Gambling Commission must make decisions independently of the Minister and the Secretary.

Within the scope of its jurisdiction, and subject to this Act, the Gambling Commission including any division must be treated as if it were a Commission of Inquiry under the Commissions of Inquiry Act Powers conferred on the Gambling Commission by this subpart are additional to powers conferred on the Gambling Commission by the application of the Commissions of Inquiry Act The Chief Gambling Commissioner, a Gambling Commissioner, or a person providing services to the Gambling Commission under section is not liable—.

The Secretary may effect insurance for the Chief Gambling Commissioner, a Gambling Commissioner, or a person providing services to the Gambling Commission under section in relation to—. The Gambling Commission may appoint experts to assist the Gambling Commission to exercise its functions or powers, or to do any of the things specified in subsection 2. The Gambling Commission may, as it thinks fit, sit as a division to carry out any of its functions under section If the Gambling Commission decides to sit as a division, the division must consist of up to 3 members, including the Chief Gambling Commissioner or a Gambling Commissioner acting on behalf of the Chief Gambling Commissioner.

The Secretary must arrange the administrative services necessary for the Gambling Commission to perform its functions. The Secretary must ensure that staff allocated to perform administrative services for the Gambling Commission are separated, physically and operationally, from other staff responsible for policy, licensing, and compliance concerning gambling.

If the Gambling Commission requires a service from the Secretary that is not prescribed by this Act, the Chief Gambling Commissioner must report the requirement to the Minister. After consultation with the Secretary, the Minister may agree to the Secretary providing the services required by the Gambling Commission.

Information held by the Gambling Commission is to be treated as information of the Department. The Minister must, within 12 sitting days of receiving the annual report, present a copy of it to the House of Representatives. Every Gambling Commissioner is, while acting as such, an official within the meaning and for the purposes of Part 6 of the Crimes Act Schedule 3 applies to the Gambling Commission. The High Court may reconsider afresh a matter that comes to it on appeal and may confirm, modify, or reverse a decision of the Gambling Commission or may direct the Gambling Commission to reconsider a decision.

A person may appeal a decision of the High Court made on appeal under subsection 1 to the Court of Appeal—. To avoid doubt, a casino licence remains in force unless it expires or is surrendered until all appeals are decided, or the period for appeal expires. A person who has a right to appeal to the Gambling Commission against 1 or more of the decisions specified in subsection 2 is not entitled to apply for judicial review of the decision unless—.

In this section, apply for judicial review means—. The Crown Entities Act applies to the Lotteries Commission except to the extent that this Act expressly provides otherwise. The board of the Lotteries Commission consists of at least 2, and not more than 9, members. Schedule 4 applies to the Lotteries Commission, its board members, its procedures, its employees, and related matters. Written directions given by the Minister may require the Lotteries Commission to vary or revoke any rule made under section or under previous gaming Acts, or to make a new rule under that section.

The Minister must consult with the Lotteries Commission before giving a direction to it. As soon as practicable after giving a direction under this section, the Minister must—. The Lotteries Commission must give effect to a direction under subsection 2 despite section of the Crown Entities Act The Lotteries Commission may make rules not inconsistent with this Act for or with respect to the conduct and operation including the establishment and distribution of prize funds of New Zealand lotteries or any type of New Zealand lotteries.

Any rules made under this section take effect on and from the date of their notification in the Gazette , or any later date that is specified in the rules. Rules made under this section may authorise designs or specifications or other matters of detail to be determined by the Lotteries Commission, and may not be challenged on the ground that they leave such matters to the discretion of the Commission.

Despite subsection 4 , the Minister may, in writing to the Lotteries Commission, require that any design, specification, or other matter of detail be incorporated in rules and not left to the discretion of the Commission.

In making any rules under this section, the Lotteries Commission must have regard to the desirability of—. Rules made under this section are a legislative instrument and a disallowable instrument for the purposes of the Legislation Act and must be presented to the House of Representatives under section 41 of that Act. The Minister must cause a copy of the notice to be published in the Gazette.

A notice given under this section is a disallowable instrument, but not a legislative instrument, for the purposes of the Legislation Act and must be presented to the House of Representatives under section 41 of that Act. The Minister may, from time to time, instruct the Lotteries Commission to promote a New Zealand lottery for any community purpose that the Minister thinks fit. In this section, community purpose has the same meaning as in section An instruction under this section is a direction for the purposes of the Crown Entities Act The Lotteries Commission may, from time to time, determine additional prizes to be distributed in accordance with a New Zealand lottery to—.

Every selling agent of tickets in a New Zealand lottery must pay the proceeds that the agent accrues from the sale of tickets in the lottery, at times or intervals determined by the Lotteries Commission, into such account opened by the Commission as the Commission directs. A selling agent may however deduct money from those proceeds as authorised by the Lotteries Commission.

The Lotteries Commission must keep those proceeds in the account, or invest them in accordance with the provisions of the Trustee Act as to the investment of trust funds, until they are dealt with under section Any interest accruing from an investment under subsection 3 , or any proceeds from the realisation of such an investment, must be paid into the account referred to in subsection 1 and treated as part of the lottery proceeds on which the interest or realisation was accrued.

Every New Zealand lottery must be drawn and prizes allocated in a manner and under conditions determined by the Lotteries Commission. The Secretary and the Auditor-General must exercise the scrutiny that they determine necessary—. Except as provided in subsection 2 , the drawing of every New Zealand lottery must be open to the public.

The Lotteries Commission may, from time to time, determine that the drawing of a particular type of New Zealand lottery is not to be open to the public. In making such a determination, the Commission must have regard to the method and frequency of the drawing and the technology used in the drawing.

Where the drawing of a New Zealand lottery is open to the public, the Lotteries Commission must publicly notify or announce, in any manner that it thinks fit,—. Immediately after the drawing of any New Zealand lottery, the Lotteries Commission must—. In this section, official result means the result of drawing a New Zealand lottery under this Act.

All the money that constitutes the prize fund of a New Zealand lottery must be paid into a lottery prize fund account. The money kept in the lottery prize fund account may be applied only towards the payment of prizes in New Zealand lotteries, except as provided in subsection 4.

The Lotteries Commission may invest any money kept in the lottery prize fund account that is not immediately required for the payment of prizes—. Any interest accruing from those investments, and any proceeds from the realisation of the investments,—. If, after the drawing of a lottery, no entitlement exists to a prize offered in the lottery, the amount of the prize must—. If the Lotteries Commission or, if appropriate, the selling agent is satisfied that the participant is entitled to the prize, the Commission or agent must pay the participant the amount of the prize out of the money constituting the prize fund for the lottery.

If the Lotteries Commission is not satisfied that a claiming participant is entitled to the prize claimed, the Commission must retain the amount of the prize in the lottery prize fund account until the question of entitlement is resolved.

If it is determined that the entitlement exists, the Lotteries Commission must pay the amount of the prize in accordance with that determination. If it is determined that no entitlement exists, the Lotteries Commission must deal with the amount of the prize in accordance with section as if it were an unclaimed prize. Despite anything in this section, no claim submitted to the Lotteries Commission under subsection 1 may be recognised if it is made later than 12 months after the drawing of the lottery to which it relates.

A person is not entitled to the payment of interest in respect of a prize in a New Zealand lottery unless the Lotteries Commission had no reasonable grounds for—. If any prize in a New Zealand lottery is not claimed within 12 months after the drawing of that lottery, or any prize in a New Zealand lottery that is an instant game is not claimed within 12 months after the date of closure of that instant game,—.

The amount of the prize must then be dealt with as if it were part of the undistributed profits of New Zealand lotteries. For the purposes of this section, the date of closure of a New Zealand lottery that is an instant game is—. All expenditure by the Lotteries Commission in any financial year must be in accordance with the approved estimate for that year, unless the Minister expressly approves otherwise. The Commission must also promptly supply to the Secretary for Internal Affairs the information needed by the Secretary to enable him or her to comply with section 1.

The Lotteries Commission may, for the purpose of assisting in the promotion, organisation, and conduct of New Zealand lotteries, or for other purposes that the Minister approves,—. The Lotteries Commission may invest any of its funds in accordance with the provisions of the Trustee Act as to the investment of trust funds. Except as provided in subsection 2 , the Lotteries Commission must, at the intervals or times that the Minister may direct, consistent with the estimate of income and expenditure approved by the Minister under section , pay its profits into such account opened under section as the Secretary directs.

The Minister may from time to time authorise the Lotteries Commission to retain the portion of its profits that the Minister thinks fit for the purposes of the Commission. The financial statements that must be prepared by the Lotteries Commission under Part 4 of the Crown Entities Act must include its financial transactions relating to the proceeds from sales of tickets in New Zealand lotteries and every special purpose lottery promoted under section No body may be incorporated or registered under any enactment or in any other manner—.

No person other than the Lotteries Commission may, either alone or with any other person,—. A person who contravenes subsection 2 commits an offence and is liable on conviction to,—. No person other than the Lotteries Commission may, either alone or with any other person, promote, organise, or conduct any gambling—. A person who contravenes subsection 1 commits an offence and is liable on conviction to,—.

A person, body corporate, or department that has entered into an arrangement, agreement, or contract under section 17 of the Crown Entities Act to do anything as agent for the Lotteries Commission, or otherwise act on behalf of the Commission, in the promotion, organisation, or conduct of any New Zealand lottery must—.

Every statement proposed under subsection 1 must be audited by the Auditor-General, who, for that purpose, has and may exercise all his or her powers under the Public Audit Act The persons who were members or alternate members of the Lotteries Commission immediately before the commencement of this subpart are deemed to have been appointed as members or alternate members of the board of the Lotteries Commission, and continue in office as such for the remainder of the terms for which they were appointed as members or alternate members of the Lotteries Commission.

The general function of the Board is to determine the proportions in which the profits of New Zealand lotteries are allocated for distribution in accordance with this subpart. In addition to the powers specifically provided in this Act, the Board has all the powers that are necessary or expedient to enable it to perform its functions. The Board may from time to time require the Secretary for Internal Affairs to prepare and forward to the Board a statement showing—. A copy of every notification made under this section must be forwarded by the Secretary of the Board to the Secretary for Internal Affairs.

A determination of the Board under this section may, by subsequent resolution, be varied or revoked and the Board must notify each distribution committee concerned of the subsequent resolution. Except as otherwise expressly provided in this subpart, the profits of New Zealand lotteries must be distributed, in accordance with the determinations of the distribution committees or the Minister, for community purposes only and for no other purpose. For the purposes of this section, a distribution is for community purposes if it would contribute to the building of strong sustainable communities by encouraging or enabling—.

A distribution for community purposes must be for a purpose that involves a community benefit of a public nature. A distribution will not be treated as being for community purposes if it involves private pecuniary profit or gain for an individual or body, except to the extent that the profit or gain arises as a mere incident of the principal purpose or purposes of the distribution. In considering those matters, a distribution committee or the Minister must, as appropriate, also have regard to the needs of older people, Pacific people and other ethnic communities, women, youth, and people with disabilities.

Despite anything in this section, if the Minister instructs the Lotteries Commission to promote and conduct a New Zealand lottery for a particular purpose under section , the profits of the lottery must be expended for that purpose. Profits of New Zealand lotteries distributed in accordance with subsection 1 or expended in accordance with subsection 2 are not subject to section of the Crown Entities Act The Board may allocate from profits of New Zealand lotteries a specified sum of money for distribution by the Minister in response to applications referred to the Minister under section 2.

The Minister may distribute any such sum accordingly, on a qualifying application referred to the Minister under section 2 for the purposes set out in section The Board may allocate from the profits of New Zealand lotteries a specified sum of money for expenditure, in accordance with the terms of their statutes, by any of the following bodies:. For the purposes of this subpart, the Minister may, by notice in the Gazette , establish such number of distribution committees as he or she thinks fit.

A distribution committee consists of the number of persons that the Minister thinks fit, being not less than 3 nor more than 5 persons. The Minister may vary the purposes in respect of which any distribution committee has been established, and may disestablish any distribution committee. Part 2 of Schedule 5 applies in relation to the members and proceedings of distribution committees.

Home Advanced search Browse About this site. Search within this Act. By sections View whole 1. Add to web feed Order a commercial print. Reprint as at 1 September Note Changes authorised by subpart 2 of Part 2 of the Legislation Act have been made in this official reprint. Note 4 at the end of this reprint provides a list of the amendments incorporated. Applications for class 4 venue licence.

Renewal or amendment of class 4 venue licence. Suspension, cancellation, or refusal to amend or renew class 4 venue licence. Disabling gambling equipment and electronic monitoring of gaming machines. Particular limits on numbers of gaming machines. Net proceeds and costs of class 4 gambling. Suspension, cancellation, and surrender of casino licence. Financial provisions relating to Lotteries Commission. Financial provisions relating to Board and distribution committees.

Harm prevention and minimisation, enforcement, and other matters. Transitional, savings, and related provisions. Conditions that may attach to casino licence.

New Zealand Lotteries Commission. New Zealand Lottery Grants Board and distribution committees. A a member of a licensing trust elected in accordance with sections to of that Act or appointed under section of that Act; or.

B a trustee of a community trust holding office under section of that Act or elected in accordance with sections to of that Act or appointed under section of that Act: B a trustee of a community trust holding office under section of that Act or elected in accordance with sections to of that Act or appointed under section of that Act; and. New Zealand lottery — a means a form of gambling conducted by the Lotteries Commission under subpart 2 of Part 3 that is — i a lottery; or.

Extended meaning of conduct. Meaning of net proceeds. Multi-terminal and multi-player gaming machines. Meaning of significant influence in casino.

Secretary may seek information to assess influence. Act binds the Crown. No increase in casino gambling. What is increase in casino gambling. Legality of gambling contracts.

Providing credit for gambling prohibited. Advertising overseas gambling prohibited. Regulations may restrict or prohibit prizes. Retail value of non-cash prize must be stated. Sales promotion schemes authorised. Secretary may categorise gambling.

Meaning of class 1 gambling. Meaning of class 2 gambling. Requirements for class 2 gambling. Meaning of class 3 gambling. Requirements for class 3 gambling. Meaning of class 4 gambling. Requirements for class 4 gambling. Existing gaming machine licences and site approvals. Status of New Zealand Racing Board and racing clubs. Meaning of casino gambling. Continuing obligations of class 3 operator. Circumstances in which corporate society may apply net proceeds to authorised purpose.

Continuing obligations of class 4 operator. Application for class 4 venue licence. Secretary must investigate applicant for class 4 venue licence. Grant of class 4 venue licence. Grounds for granting class 4 venue licence. Determining suitability for class 4 venue licence. Form and content of class 4 venue agreement.

Continuing obligations of corporate society in relation to class 4 venue licence. Content and conditions of class 4 venue licence. Significant changes in relation to class 4 venue licence must be notified. Renewal of class 4 venue licence. Amending class 4 venue licence. Suspension or cancellation of class 4 venue licence. Procedure for suspending, cancelling, or refusing to amend or renew class 4 venue licence.

Consequences of suspension, cancellation, or refusal to amend or renew class 4 venue licence. Appeal to Gambling Commission regarding class 4 venue licence. Consequences of appeal regarding class 4 venue licence.

Surrender of class 4 venue licence. Class 4 venue licence not transferable. Certain information must be displayed at class 4 venue. Obligation on disposal of gaming machines. Prohibition on certain gaming machines in class 4 venue. Functions of electronic monitoring system. Secretary may select monitor. Register of class 4 venue licences must be maintained. Limit on number of gaming machines for venue with venue licence granted after commencement.

Ministerial discretion to permit more gaming machines if clubs merge. Ministerial discretion to permit more than 9 machines at certain class 4 venues. Power to issue, renew, or amend class 4 licence may be overridden. When territorial authority consent required.

Application for territorial authority consent. Considering and determining application for territorial authority consent. Territorial authority must adopt class 4 venue policy. Adoption and review of class 4 venue policy. Provision of information relating to class 4 venues in territorial authority district. Gaming machine profits must be banked. Interest, etc, on gaming machine profits. Management of gaming machine profits bank account. Corporate society must apply or distribute net proceeds from class 4 gambling to or for authorised purpose.

Corporate society must provide annual report to Secretary. Contents of annual report. Audit must be carried out in accordance with auditing and assurance standards. Clubs that operate gambling equipment at non-commercial class 4 venues must make financial statements available to members. Other corporate societies must make financial statements available on Internet.

Annual review of criteria for distribution of net proceeds. Publication requirements for corporate societies. Application or distribution of net proceeds when corporate society ceases class 4 gambling. Orders regarding application or distribution of net proceeds.

Key persons must not be involved in certain activities or decisions. Regulations regarding application or distribution of net proceeds from class 4 gambling. Payment of commission prohibited. Duty on grant recipients. Secretary may limit or exclude operating costs of corporate society. Secretary may investigate and audit licensees, grant recipients, management services providers, and businesses at class 4 venues.

Certain persons must not seek, receive, or offer benefits with improper conditions attached. Requirements for casino gambling. Racing betting and sports betting in casinos. Existing casino licences and agreements.

Directions as to operating casinos. Gambling Commission must investigate application concerning casino licences. Mortgage or assignment of casino licence. Casino licence not transferable. Approval of casino venue agreement. Renewal of casino venue licence. Application for renewal of casino venue licence. Process for determining applications for renewal. Information and matters to be considered.

Expiry of casino venue licence. Amendment of casino licence. Conditions of casino licence. Procedure for specifying, varying, or revoking casino licence conditions. Minimum operating standards in casino licences. Procedure for specifying, varying, or revoking minimum operating standards.

Appeal to Gambling Commission. Suspension or cancellation of casino licence. Procedure for suspending or cancelling casino licence. Notification of suspension and cancellation. Surrender of casino licence. Appeal against cancellation or suspension [Repealed]. Approval for associated persons required. Responsibilities of person who acquires significant influence without approval.

Licensee to seek prior approval. Responsibility of licensee aware of person with significant influence. Review of associated persons by Secretary. Actions that may be taken by Gambling Commission. Existing certificates of approval. Certain casino employees must be approved. Application for certificate of approval. Secretary must investigate application for certificate of approval. Information and matters that Secretary may take into account.

Refusal of application for certificate of approval. Issue of certificate of approval. Expiry of certificate of approval. Commencement of duties before issue of certificate of approval. Application for suspension or cancellation of certificate of approval. Making and revoking order suspending or cancelling certificate of approval. Secretary must notify casino. Surrender of certificate of approval.

Restriction on holder of certificate of approval. Appeal to Gambling Commission regarding certificate of approval. Restricted hours of operation. On-licences under Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act Charges to enter and play not permitted. Books must be kept in casino venue.

Gambling equipment must be kept in casino venue. Prohibition on certain gaming machines in casino. Restriction on certain agreements. Procedure after issue of notice. Consequences of termination of agreement. Bank may be required to provide information.

Society may engage licensed promoter. Licensed promoter may only promote licensed class 3 gambling activity. Existing licensed promoter licences. Notice of licence application. Applicant must provide bond given by approved surety. When bond must be paid to Secretary. Secretary may appoint administrator. Consideration and payment of claims. Secretary must notify Police if licence granted. Secretary must keep register of licensed promoters.

Licensed promoter must have trust account. Trust account must be audited. Licensed promoter must render account to society. Revocation of temporary licence.

Regulations relating to licensed promoters. Establishment of Gambling Commission. Termination of appointment of Gambling Commissioner. Functions of Gambling Commission. Gambling Commission is Commission of Inquiry.

Protection of Gambling Commission and Department. Gambling Commission may engage experts and receive wide evidence. Gambling Commission may sit in divisions. Department must service Gambling Commission. Gambling Commission must provide annual report to Minister.

Remuneration of Gambling Commissioners. Corrupt use of official information. Other enactments applying to Gambling Commission. Schedule 3 applies to Gambling Commission. Functions of Lotteries Commission.

Capacity and powers [Repealed]. Board of Lotteries Commission. Further provisions about Lotteries Commission. Operation of New Zealand lotteries. Minister may require Lotteries Commission products to comply with regulations and minimum standards. Lotteries Commission may determine additional prizes. Method of drawing lottery. Scrutiny of drawings and allocations. Drawings to be open to public at discretion of Lotteries Commission.

Claims to lottery prizes. No entitlement to interest. Funds of Lotteries Commission. Estimates of income and expenditure.

Tara

The administrator may apply the bond received from an approved surety to compensate a society or participants in the class 3 gambling activity who have suffered loss or damage in the circumstances set out in section 1 as a result of the acts or omissions of the licensed promoter.

If subsection 1 applies, the administrator must publish a notice twice, at intervals of not more than 14 days in a newspaper or newspapers that the administrator considers sufficient, inviting people to lodge claims with the administrator. The administrator must not pay a claim until 6 months after the second notice required under section is given.

A person required to provide information under subsection 2 must provide the information as promptly as is reasonable in the circumstances. The Secretary may take into account matters of a similar nature to those listed in subsection 2 that occurred outside New Zealand. The Secretary must also notify the Police if the Secretary takes any other action in respect of the licence. Notice required under this section must be given to a senior constable ,—.

If the Secretary decides to amend or revoke a condition or add a new condition to a licence, the Secretary must notify the licensed promoter of—. A licensed promoter must notify the Secretary and provide details of significant changes to the information supplied in, or accompanying, an application for a licence or an amendment to or renewal of a licence.

The Secretary may require the licensed promoter to apply for an amendment to the licence under section A or may invoke the suspension or cancellation provisions under section or as a result of the notification of changes. The Secretary must keep and maintain a register that records the name and contact details of licensed promoters.

The register must be made available for inspection to constables and the public. A licensed promoter may make written submissions to the Secretary concerning the proposed suspension, cancellation, or refusal to renew within—. If subsection 4 or subsection 5 applies, the Secretary must also notify the licensed promoter of—.

Section 5 and 6 apply to the cancellation of a suspended licence. The Gambling Commission must give notice of its decision, with reasons, to both the applicant or licensed promoter and to the Secretary. This section applies to all money raised by, or paid to, a licensed promoter including interest —. A licensed promoter must pay the money into a trust account, at a registered bank, operated either—.

A licensed promoter must render an account to the society that sets out, in full, particulars of—. A licensed promoter must pay all money held in the trust account on behalf of the society to the society—. The Secretary may, on the application of a person specified in subsection 2 , authorise the applicant or any other person to carry on the business of a licensed promoter for a period of up to 3 months. An applicant must, after lodging the application with the Secretary, send a copy of it to the Police.

If the application is granted, the person who is authorised to carry on the business of the licensed promoter must be treated as if the person were the licensed promoter. The Secretary must, after granting a licence under this section, notify the Police in accordance with section The Police may apply to the Secretary for an authorisation under section 1 to be revoked if there are grounds to believe that—.

The Secretary may revoke the authorisation if the Secretary has good reason to believe that one or both of the grounds in subsection 1 have been established. In determining whether the grounds in subsection 1 have been established, the Secretary may take into account matters that occurred outside New Zealand.

The revocation does not take effect until the Secretary has notified the person concerned. This section applies if a licensed promoter is unable or unwilling to complete the promotion of a class 3 gambling activity. If subsection 1 applies, the society on whose behalf the promotion was undertaken may ask the Secretary to—.

This section is subject to sections and The Governor-General may, by Order in Council, make regulations for all or any of the following purposes:. The Governor-General may, on the recommendation of the Minister, appoint up to 5 Gambling Commissioners.

A Gambling Commissioner is appointed for a term of up to 3 years as specified in the instrument of appointment. A person appointed as a Gambling Commissioner may hold that office concurrently with other appointments. A Gambling Commissioner is not employed in the Government service for the purposes of the Government Superannuation Fund Act or the State services for the purposes of the State Sector Act only because the person is a Gambling Commissioner.

All Gambling Commissioners must have, in the opinion of the Minister, the knowledge, skills, and experience to enable them to assist in undertaking the functions, powers, and responsibilities of the Gambling Commission. A proposed Gambling Commissioner must disclose to the Minister, before appointment,—. The appointment of a Gambling Commissioner including the Chief Gambling Commissioner may be terminated by the Governor-General on the recommendation of the Minister for any reason justifying removal, including—.

Before recommending termination, the Minister must give the Gambling Commissioner the reasons for the proposed termination and a reasonable opportunity to be heard and to make submissions. The Minister must advise the Gambling Commissioner and give him or her reasons in writing for the termination. No compensation is payable to a Gambling Commissioner for termination of appointment or for loss of office.

The Gambling Commission must make decisions independently of the Minister and the Secretary. Within the scope of its jurisdiction, and subject to this Act, the Gambling Commission including any division must be treated as if it were a Commission of Inquiry under the Commissions of Inquiry Act Powers conferred on the Gambling Commission by this subpart are additional to powers conferred on the Gambling Commission by the application of the Commissions of Inquiry Act The Chief Gambling Commissioner, a Gambling Commissioner, or a person providing services to the Gambling Commission under section is not liable—.

The Secretary may effect insurance for the Chief Gambling Commissioner, a Gambling Commissioner, or a person providing services to the Gambling Commission under section in relation to—. The Gambling Commission may appoint experts to assist the Gambling Commission to exercise its functions or powers, or to do any of the things specified in subsection 2.

The Gambling Commission may, as it thinks fit, sit as a division to carry out any of its functions under section If the Gambling Commission decides to sit as a division, the division must consist of up to 3 members, including the Chief Gambling Commissioner or a Gambling Commissioner acting on behalf of the Chief Gambling Commissioner. The Secretary must arrange the administrative services necessary for the Gambling Commission to perform its functions.

The Secretary must ensure that staff allocated to perform administrative services for the Gambling Commission are separated, physically and operationally, from other staff responsible for policy, licensing, and compliance concerning gambling. If the Gambling Commission requires a service from the Secretary that is not prescribed by this Act, the Chief Gambling Commissioner must report the requirement to the Minister.

After consultation with the Secretary, the Minister may agree to the Secretary providing the services required by the Gambling Commission. Information held by the Gambling Commission is to be treated as information of the Department. The Minister must, within 12 sitting days of receiving the annual report, present a copy of it to the House of Representatives.

Every Gambling Commissioner is, while acting as such, an official within the meaning and for the purposes of Part 6 of the Crimes Act Schedule 3 applies to the Gambling Commission.

The High Court may reconsider afresh a matter that comes to it on appeal and may confirm, modify, or reverse a decision of the Gambling Commission or may direct the Gambling Commission to reconsider a decision.

A person may appeal a decision of the High Court made on appeal under subsection 1 to the Court of Appeal—.

To avoid doubt, a casino licence remains in force unless it expires or is surrendered until all appeals are decided, or the period for appeal expires. A person who has a right to appeal to the Gambling Commission against 1 or more of the decisions specified in subsection 2 is not entitled to apply for judicial review of the decision unless—. In this section, apply for judicial review means—. The Crown Entities Act applies to the Lotteries Commission except to the extent that this Act expressly provides otherwise.

The board of the Lotteries Commission consists of at least 2, and not more than 9, members. Schedule 4 applies to the Lotteries Commission, its board members, its procedures, its employees, and related matters. Written directions given by the Minister may require the Lotteries Commission to vary or revoke any rule made under section or under previous gaming Acts, or to make a new rule under that section.

The Minister must consult with the Lotteries Commission before giving a direction to it. As soon as practicable after giving a direction under this section, the Minister must—. The Lotteries Commission must give effect to a direction under subsection 2 despite section of the Crown Entities Act The Lotteries Commission may make rules not inconsistent with this Act for or with respect to the conduct and operation including the establishment and distribution of prize funds of New Zealand lotteries or any type of New Zealand lotteries.

Any rules made under this section take effect on and from the date of their notification in the Gazette , or any later date that is specified in the rules. Rules made under this section may authorise designs or specifications or other matters of detail to be determined by the Lotteries Commission, and may not be challenged on the ground that they leave such matters to the discretion of the Commission.

Despite subsection 4 , the Minister may, in writing to the Lotteries Commission, require that any design, specification, or other matter of detail be incorporated in rules and not left to the discretion of the Commission.

In making any rules under this section, the Lotteries Commission must have regard to the desirability of—. Rules made under this section are a legislative instrument and a disallowable instrument for the purposes of the Legislation Act and must be presented to the House of Representatives under section 41 of that Act. The Minister must cause a copy of the notice to be published in the Gazette. A notice given under this section is a disallowable instrument, but not a legislative instrument, for the purposes of the Legislation Act and must be presented to the House of Representatives under section 41 of that Act.

The Minister may, from time to time, instruct the Lotteries Commission to promote a New Zealand lottery for any community purpose that the Minister thinks fit.

In this section, community purpose has the same meaning as in section An instruction under this section is a direction for the purposes of the Crown Entities Act The Lotteries Commission may, from time to time, determine additional prizes to be distributed in accordance with a New Zealand lottery to—. Every selling agent of tickets in a New Zealand lottery must pay the proceeds that the agent accrues from the sale of tickets in the lottery, at times or intervals determined by the Lotteries Commission, into such account opened by the Commission as the Commission directs.

A selling agent may however deduct money from those proceeds as authorised by the Lotteries Commission. The Lotteries Commission must keep those proceeds in the account, or invest them in accordance with the provisions of the Trustee Act as to the investment of trust funds, until they are dealt with under section Any interest accruing from an investment under subsection 3 , or any proceeds from the realisation of such an investment, must be paid into the account referred to in subsection 1 and treated as part of the lottery proceeds on which the interest or realisation was accrued.

Every New Zealand lottery must be drawn and prizes allocated in a manner and under conditions determined by the Lotteries Commission. The Secretary and the Auditor-General must exercise the scrutiny that they determine necessary—. Except as provided in subsection 2 , the drawing of every New Zealand lottery must be open to the public. The Lotteries Commission may, from time to time, determine that the drawing of a particular type of New Zealand lottery is not to be open to the public.

In making such a determination, the Commission must have regard to the method and frequency of the drawing and the technology used in the drawing. Where the drawing of a New Zealand lottery is open to the public, the Lotteries Commission must publicly notify or announce, in any manner that it thinks fit,—.

Immediately after the drawing of any New Zealand lottery, the Lotteries Commission must—. In this section, official result means the result of drawing a New Zealand lottery under this Act. All the money that constitutes the prize fund of a New Zealand lottery must be paid into a lottery prize fund account. The money kept in the lottery prize fund account may be applied only towards the payment of prizes in New Zealand lotteries, except as provided in subsection 4.

The Lotteries Commission may invest any money kept in the lottery prize fund account that is not immediately required for the payment of prizes—. Any interest accruing from those investments, and any proceeds from the realisation of the investments,—. If, after the drawing of a lottery, no entitlement exists to a prize offered in the lottery, the amount of the prize must—. If the Lotteries Commission or, if appropriate, the selling agent is satisfied that the participant is entitled to the prize, the Commission or agent must pay the participant the amount of the prize out of the money constituting the prize fund for the lottery.

If the Lotteries Commission is not satisfied that a claiming participant is entitled to the prize claimed, the Commission must retain the amount of the prize in the lottery prize fund account until the question of entitlement is resolved.

If it is determined that the entitlement exists, the Lotteries Commission must pay the amount of the prize in accordance with that determination. If it is determined that no entitlement exists, the Lotteries Commission must deal with the amount of the prize in accordance with section as if it were an unclaimed prize.

Despite anything in this section, no claim submitted to the Lotteries Commission under subsection 1 may be recognised if it is made later than 12 months after the drawing of the lottery to which it relates. A person is not entitled to the payment of interest in respect of a prize in a New Zealand lottery unless the Lotteries Commission had no reasonable grounds for—. If any prize in a New Zealand lottery is not claimed within 12 months after the drawing of that lottery, or any prize in a New Zealand lottery that is an instant game is not claimed within 12 months after the date of closure of that instant game,—.

The amount of the prize must then be dealt with as if it were part of the undistributed profits of New Zealand lotteries. For the purposes of this section, the date of closure of a New Zealand lottery that is an instant game is—.

All expenditure by the Lotteries Commission in any financial year must be in accordance with the approved estimate for that year, unless the Minister expressly approves otherwise. The Commission must also promptly supply to the Secretary for Internal Affairs the information needed by the Secretary to enable him or her to comply with section 1.

The Lotteries Commission may, for the purpose of assisting in the promotion, organisation, and conduct of New Zealand lotteries, or for other purposes that the Minister approves,—. The Lotteries Commission may invest any of its funds in accordance with the provisions of the Trustee Act as to the investment of trust funds. Except as provided in subsection 2 , the Lotteries Commission must, at the intervals or times that the Minister may direct, consistent with the estimate of income and expenditure approved by the Minister under section , pay its profits into such account opened under section as the Secretary directs.

The Minister may from time to time authorise the Lotteries Commission to retain the portion of its profits that the Minister thinks fit for the purposes of the Commission. The financial statements that must be prepared by the Lotteries Commission under Part 4 of the Crown Entities Act must include its financial transactions relating to the proceeds from sales of tickets in New Zealand lotteries and every special purpose lottery promoted under section No body may be incorporated or registered under any enactment or in any other manner—.

No person other than the Lotteries Commission may, either alone or with any other person,—. A person who contravenes subsection 2 commits an offence and is liable on conviction to,—. No person other than the Lotteries Commission may, either alone or with any other person, promote, organise, or conduct any gambling—.

A person who contravenes subsection 1 commits an offence and is liable on conviction to,—. A person, body corporate, or department that has entered into an arrangement, agreement, or contract under section 17 of the Crown Entities Act to do anything as agent for the Lotteries Commission, or otherwise act on behalf of the Commission, in the promotion, organisation, or conduct of any New Zealand lottery must—.

Every statement proposed under subsection 1 must be audited by the Auditor-General, who, for that purpose, has and may exercise all his or her powers under the Public Audit Act The persons who were members or alternate members of the Lotteries Commission immediately before the commencement of this subpart are deemed to have been appointed as members or alternate members of the board of the Lotteries Commission, and continue in office as such for the remainder of the terms for which they were appointed as members or alternate members of the Lotteries Commission.

The general function of the Board is to determine the proportions in which the profits of New Zealand lotteries are allocated for distribution in accordance with this subpart. In addition to the powers specifically provided in this Act, the Board has all the powers that are necessary or expedient to enable it to perform its functions. The Board may from time to time require the Secretary for Internal Affairs to prepare and forward to the Board a statement showing—.

A copy of every notification made under this section must be forwarded by the Secretary of the Board to the Secretary for Internal Affairs. A determination of the Board under this section may, by subsequent resolution, be varied or revoked and the Board must notify each distribution committee concerned of the subsequent resolution.

Except as otherwise expressly provided in this subpart, the profits of New Zealand lotteries must be distributed, in accordance with the determinations of the distribution committees or the Minister, for community purposes only and for no other purpose.

For the purposes of this section, a distribution is for community purposes if it would contribute to the building of strong sustainable communities by encouraging or enabling—. A distribution for community purposes must be for a purpose that involves a community benefit of a public nature.

A distribution will not be treated as being for community purposes if it involves private pecuniary profit or gain for an individual or body, except to the extent that the profit or gain arises as a mere incident of the principal purpose or purposes of the distribution. In considering those matters, a distribution committee or the Minister must, as appropriate, also have regard to the needs of older people, Pacific people and other ethnic communities, women, youth, and people with disabilities.

Despite anything in this section, if the Minister instructs the Lotteries Commission to promote and conduct a New Zealand lottery for a particular purpose under section , the profits of the lottery must be expended for that purpose. Profits of New Zealand lotteries distributed in accordance with subsection 1 or expended in accordance with subsection 2 are not subject to section of the Crown Entities Act The Board may allocate from profits of New Zealand lotteries a specified sum of money for distribution by the Minister in response to applications referred to the Minister under section 2.

The Minister may distribute any such sum accordingly, on a qualifying application referred to the Minister under section 2 for the purposes set out in section The Board may allocate from the profits of New Zealand lotteries a specified sum of money for expenditure, in accordance with the terms of their statutes, by any of the following bodies:. For the purposes of this subpart, the Minister may, by notice in the Gazette , establish such number of distribution committees as he or she thinks fit.

A distribution committee consists of the number of persons that the Minister thinks fit, being not less than 3 nor more than 5 persons. The Minister may vary the purposes in respect of which any distribution committee has been established, and may disestablish any distribution committee.

Part 2 of Schedule 5 applies in relation to the members and proceedings of distribution committees. Home Advanced search Browse About this site. Search within this Act. By sections View whole 1. Add to web feed Order a commercial print. Reprint as at 1 September Note Changes authorised by subpart 2 of Part 2 of the Legislation Act have been made in this official reprint. Note 4 at the end of this reprint provides a list of the amendments incorporated.

Applications for class 4 venue licence. Renewal or amendment of class 4 venue licence. Suspension, cancellation, or refusal to amend or renew class 4 venue licence. Disabling gambling equipment and electronic monitoring of gaming machines. Particular limits on numbers of gaming machines. Net proceeds and costs of class 4 gambling. Suspension, cancellation, and surrender of casino licence. Financial provisions relating to Lotteries Commission. Financial provisions relating to Board and distribution committees.

Harm prevention and minimisation, enforcement, and other matters. Transitional, savings, and related provisions. Conditions that may attach to casino licence. New Zealand Lotteries Commission. New Zealand Lottery Grants Board and distribution committees. A a member of a licensing trust elected in accordance with sections to of that Act or appointed under section of that Act; or.

B a trustee of a community trust holding office under section of that Act or elected in accordance with sections to of that Act or appointed under section of that Act: B a trustee of a community trust holding office under section of that Act or elected in accordance with sections to of that Act or appointed under section of that Act; and. New Zealand lottery — a means a form of gambling conducted by the Lotteries Commission under subpart 2 of Part 3 that is — i a lottery; or.

Extended meaning of conduct. Meaning of net proceeds. Multi-terminal and multi-player gaming machines. Meaning of significant influence in casino. Secretary may seek information to assess influence. Act binds the Crown. No increase in casino gambling. What is increase in casino gambling. Legality of gambling contracts. Providing credit for gambling prohibited. Advertising overseas gambling prohibited. Regulations may restrict or prohibit prizes. Retail value of non-cash prize must be stated.

Sales promotion schemes authorised. Secretary may categorise gambling. Meaning of class 1 gambling. Meaning of class 2 gambling. Requirements for class 2 gambling. Meaning of class 3 gambling. Requirements for class 3 gambling. Meaning of class 4 gambling. Requirements for class 4 gambling. Existing gaming machine licences and site approvals. Status of New Zealand Racing Board and racing clubs. Meaning of casino gambling.

Continuing obligations of class 3 operator. Circumstances in which corporate society may apply net proceeds to authorised purpose. Continuing obligations of class 4 operator. Application for class 4 venue licence. Secretary must investigate applicant for class 4 venue licence. Grant of class 4 venue licence. Grounds for granting class 4 venue licence. Determining suitability for class 4 venue licence. Form and content of class 4 venue agreement. Continuing obligations of corporate society in relation to class 4 venue licence.

Content and conditions of class 4 venue licence. Significant changes in relation to class 4 venue licence must be notified. Renewal of class 4 venue licence. Amending class 4 venue licence. Suspension or cancellation of class 4 venue licence. Procedure for suspending, cancelling, or refusing to amend or renew class 4 venue licence.

Consequences of suspension, cancellation, or refusal to amend or renew class 4 venue licence. Appeal to Gambling Commission regarding class 4 venue licence. Consequences of appeal regarding class 4 venue licence. Surrender of class 4 venue licence. Class 4 venue licence not transferable. Certain information must be displayed at class 4 venue. Obligation on disposal of gaming machines. Prohibition on certain gaming machines in class 4 venue. Functions of electronic monitoring system.

Secretary may select monitor. Register of class 4 venue licences must be maintained. Limit on number of gaming machines for venue with venue licence granted after commencement. Ministerial discretion to permit more gaming machines if clubs merge.

Ministerial discretion to permit more than 9 machines at certain class 4 venues. Power to issue, renew, or amend class 4 licence may be overridden. When territorial authority consent required. Application for territorial authority consent. Considering and determining application for territorial authority consent. Territorial authority must adopt class 4 venue policy. Adoption and review of class 4 venue policy. Provision of information relating to class 4 venues in territorial authority district.

Gaming machine profits must be banked. Interest, etc, on gaming machine profits. Management of gaming machine profits bank account. Corporate society must apply or distribute net proceeds from class 4 gambling to or for authorised purpose.

Corporate society must provide annual report to Secretary. Contents of annual report. Audit must be carried out in accordance with auditing and assurance standards. Clubs that operate gambling equipment at non-commercial class 4 venues must make financial statements available to members. Other corporate societies must make financial statements available on Internet.

Annual review of criteria for distribution of net proceeds. Publication requirements for corporate societies. Application or distribution of net proceeds when corporate society ceases class 4 gambling. Orders regarding application or distribution of net proceeds.

Key persons must not be involved in certain activities or decisions. Regulations regarding application or distribution of net proceeds from class 4 gambling. Payment of commission prohibited. Duty on grant recipients. Secretary may limit or exclude operating costs of corporate society.

Secretary may investigate and audit licensees, grant recipients, management services providers, and businesses at class 4 venues.

Certain persons must not seek, receive, or offer benefits with improper conditions attached. Requirements for casino gambling. Racing betting and sports betting in casinos. Existing casino licences and agreements. Directions as to operating casinos. Gambling Commission must investigate application concerning casino licences. Mortgage or assignment of casino licence. Casino licence not transferable.

Approval of casino venue agreement. Renewal of casino venue licence. Application for renewal of casino venue licence. Process for determining applications for renewal. Information and matters to be considered.

Expiry of casino venue licence. Amendment of casino licence. Conditions of casino licence. Procedure for specifying, varying, or revoking casino licence conditions. Minimum operating standards in casino licences. Procedure for specifying, varying, or revoking minimum operating standards. Appeal to Gambling Commission. Suspension or cancellation of casino licence. Procedure for suspending or cancelling casino licence. Notification of suspension and cancellation.

Surrender of casino licence. Appeal against cancellation or suspension [Repealed]. Approval for associated persons required. Responsibilities of person who acquires significant influence without approval. Licensee to seek prior approval.

Responsibility of licensee aware of person with significant influence. Review of associated persons by Secretary. Actions that may be taken by Gambling Commission.

Existing certificates of approval. Certain casino employees must be approved. Application for certificate of approval. Secretary must investigate application for certificate of approval. Information and matters that Secretary may take into account.

Refusal of application for certificate of approval. Issue of certificate of approval. Expiry of certificate of approval. Commencement of duties before issue of certificate of approval.

Application for suspension or cancellation of certificate of approval. Making and revoking order suspending or cancelling certificate of approval. Secretary must notify casino. Surrender of certificate of approval. Restriction on holder of certificate of approval. Appeal to Gambling Commission regarding certificate of approval. Restricted hours of operation. On-licences under Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act Charges to enter and play not permitted.

Books must be kept in casino venue. Gambling equipment must be kept in casino venue. Prohibition on certain gaming machines in casino. Restriction on certain agreements. Procedure after issue of notice. Consequences of termination of agreement. Bank may be required to provide information. Society may engage licensed promoter. Licensed promoter may only promote licensed class 3 gambling activity.

Existing licensed promoter licences. Notice of licence application. Applicant must provide bond given by approved surety. When bond must be paid to Secretary. Secretary may appoint administrator. Consideration and payment of claims. Secretary must notify Police if licence granted. Secretary must keep register of licensed promoters. Licensed promoter must have trust account. Trust account must be audited. Licensed promoter must render account to society. Revocation of temporary licence.

Regulations relating to licensed promoters. Establishment of Gambling Commission. Termination of appointment of Gambling Commissioner. Functions of Gambling Commission. Gambling Commission is Commission of Inquiry. Protection of Gambling Commission and Department. Gambling Commission may engage experts and receive wide evidence. Gambling Commission may sit in divisions. Department must service Gambling Commission. Gambling Commission must provide annual report to Minister.

Remuneration of Gambling Commissioners. Corrupt use of official information. Other enactments applying to Gambling Commission.

Schedule 3 applies to Gambling Commission. Functions of Lotteries Commission. Capacity and powers [Repealed]. Board of Lotteries Commission.

Further provisions about Lotteries Commission. Operation of New Zealand lotteries. Minister may require Lotteries Commission products to comply with regulations and minimum standards. Lotteries Commission may determine additional prizes. Method of drawing lottery. Scrutiny of drawings and allocations. Drawings to be open to public at discretion of Lotteries Commission. Claims to lottery prizes.

No entitlement to interest. Funds of Lotteries Commission. Estimates of income and expenditure. Exemption from income tax. Protection of product names. Contracts with other bodies [Repealed].

Accounts of bodies assisting Lotteries Commission and audit of accounts. Members of Lotteries Commission continue in office. New Zealand Lottery Grants Board. Amounts available for allocation by Board. Purposes for which profits may be distributed. Allocation of profits to certain statutory bodies. Functions of distribution committees. Secretary is corporation sole for certain purposes. Loans to Lotteries Commission. Accounts of profits and audit. Remuneration of members of Board and distribution committees.

Protection of members, distribution committees, and employees. Casino Control Authority abolished [Repealed]. Consequences of dissolution [Repealed]. Employees of Authority [Repealed]. Age restriction on instant games and similar games.

Age restriction on class 4 gambling. Age restriction on gambling in casinos. Power to require particulars. Gambling operator must refuse to pay under-age person. Court may order return of money or prize. Admission to class 4 venue and casino venue. Requirement to develop policy for identifying problem gamblers. Exclusion order may be issued to problem gambler identified under section Duty to assist problem gambler if ongoing concern exists.

Exclusion order must be issued to self-identified problem gambler. Requirement to remove person who enters gambling venue in breach of exclusion order. Offences relating to breach of exclusion order. Duty to keep record of excluded persons. Regulations relating to harm prevention and minimisation.

Regulations relating to gaming machines in class 4 venue. Regulations relating to admission to and exclusion from gambling area of class 4 venue and casino venue. Regulations relating to exclusion of problem gamblers. Integrated problem gambling strategy focused on public health. Process for developing integrated problem gambling strategy. Regulations relating to problem gambling levy.

Problem gambling levy regulations are confirmable instrument. Levy may be calculated for period of less than 3 years. Problem gambling committee [Repealed]. Gambling equipment must comply with minimum standards.

The fly at least cannot be jockeyed. Some of the images of Chinese as a race of gamblers is a stereotype. Explaining why the Chinese in Macau and Singapore "are not so gambling-mad" as those in Hong Kong, a respected magazine editor told the Washington Post, "the reasons for the level of betting here are social and economic rather than cultural.

Mah-jongg is the most popular game in China. It is played throughout Asia and by some groups of elderly Jewish ladies in the United States. Resembling dominoes, it is usually played with four people and a pair of dice and heavy plastic tiles plus eight optional tiles with numbers, symbols and Chinese characters inscribed on them.

The tiles make a very distinct sound when they are slapped on a table. All over China, you can hear this sound: Mah-jongg has been played in China for centuries.

Mah-jongg was banned in China during the Cultural Revolution. Mah-jongg involves both luck and strategy. The rules and player goals are somewhat similar to those in Gin Rummy.

Players draw and discard, trying to get combinations that score points. Different versions of the game are played in different places.

The most popular version became popular in the city of Ningbo in the late 19th century. The slapping of tiles can be so loud and incessant, and players can play the game for such long periods of time that some players lose their hearing. Hearing loss is such a problem that the Hong Kong government decided to cover employees of mah-jongg parlors with a fund used to compensate people for hearing loss in noisy occupations. There are three suits in mah-jongg: Characters, Bamboos and Dots.

Each suit has nine numbers. Each number has four tiles. This means there are 36 Characters, 36 Dots and 36 Bamboos, for a total of suit tiles. There are also 28 honor tiles, comprised of 12 Dragon tiles four tiles for each of three different colored dragons, red, green and white and 16 Wind tiles four tiles for each of the four wind directions. There are three kinds of sets that players aim to get: Kongs are worth the most points.

Chows are worth nothing at all. Extra points are scored for going out first. There are also ways to double and triple the score. At the beginning of the game, each player starts with 2, points in counters. When a game is over each losing player has to give the winner his winning score in points from the counters.

The losing players also have to give points to players that have more points than them. When gambling each point had has a monetary value.

The object of the mah-jongg is to collect high-scoring tiles. An elaborate ritual is used to select the seating arrangement. Once that is worked out all the tiles are turned face down and mixed up. Each player selects 34 tiles and stack them up in front of him without looking at them so each player has a wall in front of him composed of two rows of 17 tiles stacked on top of one another. The four walls are shoved together to form a sort of foundation.

Another elaborate ritual is used to make an opening in the foundation. Moving counterclockwise around the table, each player takes two pairs of tiles, until everyone has 12 tiles, and arranges them as they would with cards in a game of gun rummy. The players then take turns drawing new tiles and discarding old ones face up.

The next player can take a face up tile or face down one. Only the last discard can be picked up, and it can only be picked up if the player can it use for a pung or a chow.

If this is the case he exposes all the tiles by laying them down next to the wall. This is known as the exposed hand. It scores less points than the concealed hand.

It is possible to take a tile for a pung any time, and play continues with the next player. There are other rules about declaring kongs, getting extra tiles, making kongs from pungs and determining what to do when someone declare mah-jongg. Mah-jongg and gambling go hand and hand. Explaining the link with gambling, one man told the Los Angeles Times, "There's got to be some money involved.

Otherwise there's no fun. Businessmen often play with officials that always win. Mah-jongg is widely played for money outside of China. Filipino president Estrada lost millions of dollars, gambling on mah-jongg. Many people play mah-jongg in legal and illegal mah-jongg parlors that are filled with smoking and cursing players, playing in tables packed closely to one another.

Because of its association with gambling, mah-jongg has always been associated with prostitutes and opium dens. Some admit Chinese only. Others are owned by Chinese and receive power and water from China. Casinos are illegal in China. Around 85 percent of the high rollers at Las Vegas are from Asia and increasingly from China. Chinese New Year is the biggest night of the year. The tables are laid out according to feng shui and Asian food is offered 24 hours a day.

Mark Six is a popular underground casino game in which players try to guess the numbers on colored ping pong balls pulled out of a transparent cylinder. A favorite game among Chinese is baccarat. Heaven-earth harmony is another popular Asian casino game in which a ping pong ball is dropped onto a grid with people betting in where it will land.

In December , the Economist reported: Marble columns, gold decor and money are everywhere. But behind the glittering facades there are signs of something darker It is also fuelled by a stampede of nervous money fleeing the mainland.

A look behind the scenes at Macau reveals a lot about Chinese corruption, and also about how scared many Chinese businessfolk are about the political climate back home. The Economist, December 10, ]. Since when American casino operators first opened there, Macau has grown faster than a dealer sorts chips.

Gaming revenues in the first 11 months of the year were 44 percent higher than in ; Macau is now four times bigger than Las Vegas. Because gambling is illegal in mainland China, Macau is their destination of choice. In Las Vegas casinos carry out background checks on gamblers and lend to them directly. At best there would be less money to lend. But junkets that could not collect debts might implode, leaving the casinos that had extended credit to them with big losses.

Many casino executives do not seem to know how much money they have lent to junkets, which makes it hard to assess the possible extent of defaults. Casino operators, like their customers, remain sanguine about future winnings. According to analysts, no big junket has reported any issues with bad loans so far. A casino executive said recently that he worried less about a junket going under than he did about the implication of a Macanese official in a corruption scandal or a murder at a casino.

You can bet that the casinos want to avoid that. Such people do not need loans to play and offer better margins, because casinos do not need to pay junkets a cut. A high-speed railway being built from Guangzhou to Macau will make it easier to lure them.

Some casinos are also building venues with less floor space for blackjack and more for shops, theatres and restaurants. This may help placate the government in Beijing, which would rather see its citizens shop for jewellery than for a different currency. But as long as money feels nervous in China, it will seek a way out, and Macau is awfully convenient. It is not just a passion for cards that brought more than A government official who has embezzled state funds, for example, may arrange to gamble in Macau through a junket.

When he arrives, his chips are waiting for him. When he cashes out, his winnings are paid in Hong Kong dollars, which he can stash in a bank in Hong Kong or take farther afield. Some bypass junkets and instead use pawnshops and other stores, where they buy an item with yuan and promptly sell it back for Macanese pataca or Hong Kong dollarsless, of course, a generous cut for the shopkeeper. The flow of money through Macau has caught the eye of the government in Beijing and may explain a temporary crackdown in on the number of Macau visas given to mainland Chinese.

According to cables made public by WikiLeaks, an online troublemaker, others are also watching. The Los Angeles Times described a casino in Myanmar near the Chinese border that was housed in a warehouse-like building the size of two football fields and contained eight banks of roulette tables, rows of electronic blackjack machines and 12 pits for heaven-earth harmony. Buses and vans in nearby town of Ruili ferry customers to the casino. There was no alcohol and almost no small talk. The gambling machines, chairs and tables were battered suggesting an operation than has been moved repeatedly.

But if you have good connections you can stay in business even when the other are closed down. The government has shut down thousands of underground gambling parlors. In , the Chinese government launched a campaign to crack down on gambling in China and urged neighboring countries to help out.

We must stop this illegal activity. The move was prompted by embarrassing revelations about party cadres losing large amounts of public money at foreign casinos and local officials gambling during work hours at local tea houses.

In , there were casinos across the border in Myanmar, Russia, North Korea, and Vietnam, most of them illegal. Under Chinese government campaign many were shut down. As of April there were only 28 left.

In Some cases the supplies of water and power were cut off to the towns that hosted the casinos. Thousands of underground betting parlors were shut down. Neighboring countries were told to close casinos at the border. A hour hotline was set up to receive tips on illegal gambling operations. Hundreds of thousands of gamblers were questioned or temporally detained. Tens of thousands were arrested, with the majority of them being released after paying a fine. Indeed many places were shut down but they reopened after the authorities left and the campaign was over.

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Gambling Commission means the commission established by section Gambling Commissioner means a person appointed under section as a member of the Gambling Commission. Lotteries Commission means the New Zealand Lotteries Commission established under section 72 of the Gaming and Lotteries Act and continued in existence under section of this Act. Minister means the Minister of the Crown who, with the authority of the Prime Minister, is for the time being responsible for the administration of this Act or the relevant Part or provision of this Act.

Secretary means the Secretary for Internal Affairs. For the purposes of the definition of sales promotion scheme , the reference to standard rate means a rate that—. In this Act, a reference to possibility, in relation to problem gambling or underage gambling, is a reference to risk, and vice versa. Section 4 1 allocate: Section 4 1 allocation: Section 4 1 apply: Section 4 1 approved evidence of age document: Section 4 1 class 4 venue: Section 4 1 distribute: Section 4 1 gambling assets: Section 4 1 gaming machine paragraph a: Section 4 1 game rules: Section 4 1 housie paragraph a: Section 4 1 illegal gambling: Section 4 1 infringement offence paragraph b: Section 4 1 instant game: Section 4 1 management services provider: Section 4 1 net proceeds: Section 4 1 New Zealand lottery paragraph a: Section 4 1 relevant offence paragraph b: Section 4 1 remote interactive gambling paragraph a: Section 4 1 responsible gambling: Section 4 1 sales promotion scheme: Section 4 1 sales promotion scheme paragraph c: Section 4 1 venue operator: In this Act, conduct , in relation to gambling, includes any of the following activities:.

In this Act, net proceeds , in relation to any gambling, means—. In this Act, each terminal or player station of a multi-terminal or multi-player gaming machine must be treated as 1 gaming machine. A person has a significant influence in a casino if the person—. A significant influence in a casino includes any influence that the Secretary or the Gambling Commission as the case may be considers to be a significant interest in the management, ownership, or operation of a casino, however acquired or to be acquired.

Subsection 1 does not limit what the Secretary or the Gambling Commission, as the case may be, considers to be a significant influence under subsection 2. If the Secretary believes, on reasonable grounds, that a particular person may have a significant influence in a casino, the Secretary may advise that person and the holder of, or applicant for, or proposed transferee or alienee of, the relevant casino licence of that belief.

The person believed to have a significant influence in a casino or other person to whom the Secretary has given advice may provide the Secretary with information and submissions about that belief within 1 month of receiving advice of that belief. The Secretary may then determine whether or not the person has a significant influence in a casino, having regard to submissions and information provided under subsection 2. A determination under subsection 3 that a person has a significant influence in a casino from a particular date does not prevent the Secretary deciding that a person had a significant influence before that date.

The transitional, savings, and related provisions set out in Schedule 1AA have effect according to their terms. The following types of gambling are prohibited and illegal and are not authorised by and may not be authorised under this Act:. Decisions on what constitutes an increase in the opportunities for casino gambling are a function of the Gambling Commission.

An increase in the opportunities for casino gambling includes but is not limited to—. No compensation is payable by the Crown to any person for any loss or damage arising from the enactment or operation of sections 10 to Every contract for, or relating to, illegal gambling is an illegal contract for the purposes of subpart 5 of Part 2 of the Contract and Commercial Law Act , and that subpart applies accordingly. A person conducting gambling must not offer or provide credit if the person knows or ought to know that the credit is intended to be used for gambling.

A person must not publish or arrange to publish, in New Zealand, an overseas gambling advertisement. The Governor-General may, by Order in Council, restrict the application of this section, if satisfied that an order is necessary to enable New Zealand to comply with its international obligations relating to trade in services that are or will become binding on New Zealand. The Governor-General may, by Order in Council, make regulations that, consistent with the purpose of this Act, restrict or prohibit any property whether real or personal or services being offered or used as a prize for gambling.

Gambling that offers or uses any property or services as a prize in breach of regulations made under subsection 1 is illegal gambling. In this section, property or services includes an entitlement to property or services.

A person who is conducting gambling must inform participants, at the time and place of sale of the tickets, of the retail value and characteristics of any non-cash prize offered or used as a prize for the gambling.

Gambling that offers or uses any non-cash prize in breach of subsection 1 is illegal gambling. The Secretary may, by notice in the Gazette , categorise any game, or category or class of game, or form of gambling, as being included in or excluded from a class of gambling if the Secretary considers that—.

A notice given under subsection 1 is a disallowable instrument, but not a legislative instrument, for the purposes of the Legislation Act and must be presented to the House of Representatives under section 41 of that Act. In this Act, class 1 gambling is gambling that satisfies the following criteria:. In this Act, class 2 gambling is gambling that satisfies the following criteria and the requirements specified in section In this Act, class 3 gambling is gambling that satisfies the following criteria:.

A licensed promoter may promote only class 3 gambling that is not conducted regularly. In this section, gambling is conducted regularly if it is conducted in sessions of more than 1 game. In this Act, class 4 gambling is gambling that satisfies the following criteria:. The New Zealand Racing Board and societies that are racing clubs under the Racing Act must be treated as corporate societies—.

A class 4 venue licence may be issued to the New Zealand Racing Board or a racing club to conduct class 4 gambling only at—. However, a class 4 venue licence may not be issued to the New Zealand Racing Board or a racing club if another corporate society other than the New Zealand Racing Board or that racing club —. The Secretary may return an incomplete application, and the accompanying documents and any fee, to an applicant.

If a racing code is required to provide information about a person, then it must provide any information that it holds that relates to—. A person required to provide information under this section must provide the information as promptly as is reasonable in the circumstances.

Notification must be made before, or as soon as practicable after, the changes occur. The Secretary may require the society to apply for an amendment under section 42 , or may invoke the suspension or cancellation provisions under sections 43 and 44 , as a result of the notification.

If a governing document is changed with an effect described in subsection 1 without the approval of the Secretary, the change may be ignored by the Minister, the Secretary, the Gambling Commission, or the Department in applying this Act. An application must be on the relevant standard form and be accompanied by any items listed in section 35 that the Secretary requests in order to consider the application and effect the renewal. An application must be on the relevant standard form and be accompanied by any items listed in section 35 that the Secretary requests in order to consider the application and effect the amendment.

The Secretary may exercise the power of suspension conferred by this section in respect of any breach that falls within any of paragraphs a to c of subsection 1 , whether or not—. The society may make written submissions to the Secretary concerning the proposed suspension, cancellation, or refusal to amend or renew within—. If the Secretary decides to suspend a licence, the Secretary must notify the society of—. Where the licence is suspended because of a continuing breach, the Secretary must notify the society of—.

If the Secretary decides to cancel or refuse to amend or renew a licence, the Secretary must notify the society of,—. If subsection 4 or subsection 5 applies, the Secretary must also notify the society of—.

The Secretary may decide to withdraw a suspension before the end of the suspension period if the reasons for the suspension are resolved to the satisfaction of the Secretary. The Secretary may decide to cancel a suspended licence at the end of the suspension period if the reasons for the suspension are not resolved to the satisfaction of the Secretary.

Section 44 5 and 6 apply to the cancellation of a suspended licence. Subject to section 47 , a licence that is suspended or cancelled or refused to be renewed or amended remains in force or unchanged as the case may be until the period for making an appeal expires.

A society may appeal to the Gambling Commission against a decision of the Secretary to—. A corporate society may apply to the Secretary for a licence to conduct class 4 gambling. The Secretary may take into account matters of a similar nature to those listed in subsection 4 that occurred outside New Zealand. When considering whether subsection 1 applies to a corporate society, the Secretary may take the following into account:.

When considering whether subsection 1 applies to a corporate society that is a club, the Secretary may also take the following into account:. The Secretary may require the corporate society to apply for an amendment under section 57 , or may invoke the suspension or cancellation provisions under sections 58 and 59 , as a result of the notification.

The Secretary may exercise the power of suspension conferred by this section in respect of any breach that falls within any of paragraphs a to d of subsection 1 whether or not—.

The corporate society may make written submissions to the Secretary concerning the proposed suspension, cancellation, or refusal to amend or renew within—. If the Secretary decides to suspend a licence, the Secretary must notify the corporate society of—. If the Secretary decides to cancel or refuse to amend or renew a licence, the Secretary must notify the corporate society of,—. If subsection 4 or subsection 5 applies, the Secretary must also notify the corporate society of—.

Section 59 5 and 6 apply to the cancellation of a suspended licence. Subject to section 62 , a licence that is suspended or cancelled or refused to be renewed or amended remains in force or unchanged as the case may be until the period for making an appeal expires.

A corporate society may appeal to the Gambling Commission against a decision of the Secretary to—. To avoid doubt, the specification of an expiry date under section 53 1A is not a decision that may be appealed to the Gambling Commission.

The application must also be accompanied by a class 4 venue agreement unless the Secretary is satisfied that the applicant is a club that intends to operate gambling equipment at a non-commercial class 4 venue that—.

Despite subsection 3 , an application by the New Zealand Racing Board or a racing club is not required to be accompanied by a venue agreement.

The Secretary may request from the applicant any further information that the Secretary considers necessary to consider the application properly. The Secretary must undertake any investigations the Secretary considers necessary to determine—.

The Secretary may undertake whatever investigations the Secretary considers necessary to determine whether any other key person is a suitable person in terms of section Subsection 3 does not limit subsection 1 or 2. The Secretary must refuse to grant a class 4 venue licence unless the Secretary is satisfied that—.

If the Secretary decides to refuse to grant a class 4 venue licence, the Secretary must notify the applicant, or, if there is a venue agreement, the parties to the agreement, and the venue manager of—. In determining whether a key person is a suitable person for the purpose of sections 66 and 67 , the Secretary may investigate and take into account the following things:.

The Secretary may take into account matters of a similar nature to those listed in subsection 1 that occurred outside New Zealand. The form and content of a class 4 venue agreement must be approved by the Secretary and must include—. A class 4 venue agreement must be signed by the holder of, or applicant for, the class 4 venue licence and the venue operator.

The expiry date of a class 4 venue agreement may be overridden by anything to the contrary in this Act, game rules, minimum standards, or licence conditions but, in any case, must not be later than 3 years after the date of the venue agreement. A corporate society that holds a class 4 venue licence must, in relation to class 4 gambling conducted at the class 4 venue for which the licence is held, ensure that, at all times,—.

A class 4 venue licence must include the following information and conditions:. The Secretary may specify any expiry date for a class 4 venue licence that is not more than 3 years after the commencement date of that licence.

If the Secretary decides to amend or revoke a condition or add a new condition to a class 4 venue licence, the Secretary must notify the corporate society or the parties to the venue agreement, and the venue manager, of—. A corporate society holding a class 4 venue licence must notify the Secretary, and provide details, if any of the following things occur:. Notification must be made before, or as soon as practicable after, an event listed in subsection 1 occurs. The powers and obligations in section 66 apply to a notification as if the notification were an application for a class 4 venue licence.

The Secretary may require the corporate society to apply for an amendment under section 73 , or may invoke the suspension or cancellation provisions under sections 74 and 75 , as a result of the notification. A corporate society may apply to the Secretary for a renewal of its class 4 venue licence before the expiry of the licence. An application must be on the relevant standard form and be accompanied by any items listed in section 65 that the Secretary requests in order to consider the application and effect the renewal.

Sections 66 and 67 apply to an application for renewal as if it were an application for a class 4 venue licence. A corporate society must apply to the Secretary to amend its class 4 venue licence if the corporate society proposes to—. An application must be on the relevant standard form and be accompanied by any items listed in section 65 that the Secretary requests in order to consider the application and effect the amendment.

Sections 66 and 67 apply to an application for amendment as if it were an application for a class 4 venue licence. The Secretary may suspend for up to 6 months, or cancel, a class 4 venue licence if the Secretary is satisfied that—.

In deciding whether to suspend or cancel a class 4 venue licence, the Secretary must take into account the matters in section If the Secretary proposes to suspend, cancel, or refuse to amend or renew a class 4 venue licence, the Secretary must notify the corporate society or, if there is a venue agreement, the parties to the agreement, and the venue manager of—.

The corporate society or the parties to the venue agreement, and the venue manager may make written submissions to the Secretary concerning the proposed suspension, cancellation, or refusal to amend or renew within—. The Secretary must consider any submissions made by the corporate society or the parties to the venue agreement, or the venue manager. If the Secretary decides to suspend a licence, the Secretary must notify the corporate society or the parties to the venue agreement, and the venue manager of—.

If the Secretary decides to cancel or refuse to amend or renew a licence, the Secretary must notify the corporate society or the parties to the venue agreement, and the venue manager of,—.

If subsection 4 or subsection 5 applies, the Secretary must also notify the corporate society or the parties to the venue agreement, and the venue manager of—. The suspension or cancellation of, or refusal to amend or renew, a class 4 venue licence does not affect—.

Section 75 5 and 6 apply to the cancellation of a suspended licence. Subject to section 78 , a licence that is suspended or cancelled or refused to be renewed or amended remains in force or unchanged as the case may be until the period for making an appeal expires.

A corporate society is not entitled to a refund of fees, taxes, or levies paid in relation to class 4 gambling if the Secretary suspends, cancels, or refuses to amend or renew its class 4 venue licence.

A corporate society or, if there is a venue agreement, the parties to the agreement, and the venue manager may appeal to the Gambling Commission against a decision of the Secretary to—.

To avoid doubt, the specification of an expiry date under section 70 1A is not a decision that may be appealed to the Gambling Commission. The Secretary must, as soon as practicable after receiving a complaint, investigate the complaint and notify the complainant, if possible, as to whether any action has been, or will be, taken in respect of the complaint and the nature of any action taken.

The complainant may complain to the Gambling Commission about the way the Secretary has handled the complaint. The holder of a class 4 venue licence must display at the class 4 venue the following information:. If a class 4 venue agreement is not required in respect of the class 4 venue under section 65 3 or 4 , the information must be displayed at all times on a sign in the immediate area where gaming machines are located.

The Secretary must enable or unseal gambling equipment if the Secretary no longer believes, on reasonable grounds, that the gambling equipment does not comply with minimum standards, or is faulty, or has been tampered with or the Secretary is satisfied that the problem has been, or will be, rectified. If a fault in the electronic monitoring system or the telecommunications system used to operate the electronic monitoring system causes gambling equipment not to operate, the Crown or a person appointed under section 88 to implement and operate the system is not liable for any compensation to any person for loss or damage caused by the failure of the equipment to operate.

The Secretary may appoint 1 person that the Secretary considers to be suitable to implement and operate an electronic monitoring system. Despite subsection 1 , the Secretary may appoint 1 or more persons that the Secretary considers to be suitable to implement and operate 1 or more electronic monitoring systems in order to facilitate the transfer of an electronic monitoring system from the person appointed under subsection 1 to another person.

A society that operates gaming machines on the commencement of this section must notify the Secretary, in the manner that the Secretary reasonably requests, within 1 month after the commencement of this section of—.

No compensation is payable by the Crown or a territorial authority to any person for any loss or damage arising from the enactment or operation of sections 89 to or section 5A. A corporate society must not operate more than 18 gaming machines at a class 4 venue. The number of gaming machines notified to the Secretary under section 89 1 , and the models and serial numbers of the gaming machines, must be treated as a condition of the class 4 venue licence and the corporate society must not change the gaming machines, or operate more than that number of gaming machines at the venue, unless—.

A corporate society must not operate more than 9 gaming machines at a class 4 venue. This section applies to 2 or more corporate societies that the Minister is satisfied are clubs and—.

The corporate societies may apply jointly to the Minister for approval to operate up to the number of gaming machines consented to by the territorial authority at the proposed venue. The Minister may approve an application under subsection 2 as the Minister sees fit. The corporate societies may then apply jointly to the Secretary for a class 4 venue licence for the proposed venue in accordance with section 65 , but the Secretary must not issue a class 4 venue licence until the corporate societies have—.

This section applies to a corporate society that the Minister is satisfied is a club that proposes to operate gaming machines at a class 4 venue and to which section 92 does not apply and that—. The corporate society may apply to the Minister for approval to operate up to 18 gaming machines at the proposed venue. The corporate society may then apply to the Secretary for a class 4 venue licence for the venue in accordance with section 65 or, if it holds a class 4 venue licence for the venue, an amendment to the licence in accordance with section An application for a territorial authority consent must be made to the territorial authority for the district in which the class 4 venue is, or will be, located.

The application must be accompanied by the information required by the territorial authority to enable it to consider the application properly. An application for consent in accordance with a relocation policy may be made only with the agreement of the venue operator of the existing venue.

However, if a corporate society applies for a territorial authority consent for an amendment to a class 4 venue licence to allow an increase in the number of gaming machines that may be operated at a venue, a territorial authority—. The territorial authority must notify the applicant of its determination within 30 working days after the later of—.

A territorial authority must not consider an application for a territorial authority consent before it has a class 4 venue policy. A territorial authority must, within 6 months after the commencement of this section, adopt a policy on class 4 venues. In adopting a policy, the territorial authority must have regard to the social impact of gambling within the territorial authority district. In determining its policy on whether class 4 venues may be established in the territorial authority district, where any venue may be located, and any restrictions on the maximum number of gaming machines that may be operated at venues, the territorial authority may have regard to any relevant matters, including:.

A relocation policy is a policy setting out if and when the territorial authority will grant consent in respect of a venue within its district where the venue is intended to replace an existing venue within the district to which a class 4 venue licence applies in which case section 97A applies. A policy may be amended or replaced only in accordance with the special consultative procedure, and this section applies to that amendment or replacement.

A territorial authority must, as soon as practicable after adopting, amending, or replacing a policy, provide a copy of the policy to the Secretary. A territorial authority must complete a review of a policy within 3 years after the policy is adopted and then within 3 years after that review and each subsequent review is completed.

The first time that a territorial authority commences a review of a policy after the Gambling Gambling Harm Reduction Amendment Act comes into force, the territorial authority must and may at any other time consider whether to include a relocation policy as defined in section 5 in its class 4 venue policy.

Whenever a territorial authority is considering whether to include a relocation policy in its class 4 venue policy, it must consider the social impact of gambling in high-deprivation communities within its district. A policy does not cease to have effect because it is due for review or being reviewed. The venue manager must bank the gaming machine profits within the time frame specified in regulations made under section or, if no time frame is specified, as soon as reasonably practicable.

In this section and sections and A , gaming machine profits means the turnover of class 4 gambling minus the total prizes paid. The interest, investment return, or proceeds must be banked within the time frame specified in regulations made under section or, if no time frame is specified, as soon as reasonably practicable. Unless the Secretary gives consent to some or all of the gaming machine profits, interest, investment return, and any gain above the book value from the sale of gambling assets being transferred to another bank account, the gaming machine profits, interest, investment return, and any gain above the book value from the sale of gambling assets must remain in the account for the gaming machine profits until the class 4 operator either—.

To avoid doubt, the requirement in subsection 1 for a corporate society to apply or distribute the net proceeds from class 4 gambling is subject to the restriction in section 52A relating to the circumstances in which a corporate society may apply, rather than distribute, those net proceeds.

A corporate society must, not later than 3 months after the end of its financial year, provide to the Secretary an annual report on the conduct of class 4 gambling by the corporate society during the financial year. The first financial year for which a corporate society must provide an annual report is the financial year that commences after the commencement of this section.

The requirements of this section are in addition to any other reporting requirements imposed on the corporate society in or under this Act or any other enactment. In this section and section A , auditor means,—. An auditor must, in carrying out an audit on the information contained in an annual report under section , comply with all applicable auditing and assurance standards. In this section, applicable auditing and assurance standard has the same meaning as in section 5 of the Financial Reporting Act This section applies to a corporate society that is a club that operates gambling equipment at a non-commercial class 4 venue that—.

This section applies to a corporate society other than a corporate society to which section B applies. A corporate society that mainly or wholly distributes net proceeds to the community must, at least annually, review the criteria, methods, systems, and policies it uses for consideration of applications for the distribution of net proceeds.

This section applies to a corporate society that mainly or wholly distributes net proceeds to the community. A corporate society must publish, at intervals of not more than 3 months, the availability of net proceeds for authorised purposes.

A corporate society must publish, at least 1 month before any net proceeds are distributed through grants to the community,—. A corporate society must publish at least annually, or at any shorter intervals specified by regulations, a statement that discloses the following matters:. A corporate society must, in accordance with the regulations, provide the Secretary with an electronic version of every statement published under subsection 4.

A corporate society that has not operated class 4 gambling for a period of more than 4 weeks must, unless it has notified the Secretary and the Secretary has agreed that it may remain inactive for a further specified period,—.

A key person in relation to a class 4 venue licence , the application for which was required under section 65 3 to be accompanied by a class 4 venue agreement, applies must not—. The Governor-General may, by Order in Council, make regulations for all or any of the following purposes relating to the application and distribution of net proceeds from class 4 gambling:. The payment of, or receipt of, commission by any person for conducting class 4 gambling is prohibited.

A grant recipient who receives a grant of net proceeds from class 4 gambling must use the grant—. A notice under subsection 1 may apply to specified licence holders or to classes of licence holder. A limit may be expressed in any way that the Secretary considers appropriate, for example,—. A contract or other arrangement or obligation entered into by a corporate society, whether before or after the enactment of this Act, that does not comply with limits set under subsection 1 is an illegal contract for the purposes of subpart 5 of Part 2 of the Contract and Commercial Law Act The Secretary may, to the extent that is necessary to determine compliance with this Act, investigate and audit the generation , application, and distribution of the proceeds from class 4 gambling, which may include—.

The persons referred to in subsection 1 must provide any information required by the Secretary for the purpose of carrying out an investigation or audit under that subsection. The Secretary may publish, or require the corporate society to publish, in the form that the Secretary considers appropriate—. A key person in relation to a class 4 venue licence must not knowingly receive or seek money, a benefit, an advantage, privilege, or gift from the following persons, if the receipt has an improper condition attached to it and whether the receipt or condition is direct, indirect, formal, informal, or otherwise:.

Racing betting or sports betting in a casino that is conducted by the New Zealand Racing Board and that is authorised by, and complies with, the Racing Act must not be treated as casino gambling and, accordingly, is not subject to this subpart. A casino licence holder must notify the Secretary within 10 working days after the licence holder enters into an agreement with the New Zealand Racing Board that allows the New Zealand Racing Board to conduct racing betting or sports betting in a casino.

Only the following persons may use in their branding the word casino, or any other word or get-up, in a way that conveys the impression that a place is a casino and accessible to the public:. Persons referred to in subsection 2 must cease using the word or get-up referred to in subsection 2 18 months after the commencement of this section. This section does not override other laws affecting branding and use of words and get-up.

An existing casino premises licence becomes, and must be treated as if it were, a casino venue licence. An existing casino venue agreement becomes, and must be treated as if it were, a casino venue agreement approved under section Directions given by the Authority under section 70 of the Casino Control Act become, and must be treated as if they were, minimum operating standards specified under section In considering whether an applicant or person with a significant influence is suitable, the Gambling Commission must take into account the following matters:.

The Police and any government agency to whom the application is referred must inquire into, and report to the Gambling Commission on, the applicant, the proposed transferee or alienee, and persons with a significant influence. Fingerprints and photographs provided by the Gambling Commission to the Police or other government agency must be returned to the Gambling Commission for destruction under subsection 6.

A holder of a casino licence may not mortgage, charge, or otherwise encumber a casino licence unless the proposed holder of, and the nature, terms, and conditions of, the mortgage, charge, or encumbrance are first approved by the Gambling Commission.

A casino licence may not be transferred or alienated as a result of a mortgage, charge, or encumbrance being enforced unless the proposed transferee or alienee and any person who has or is likely to have a significant influence has first been approved by the Gambling Commission.

A charge holder, mortgagee, or holder of an encumbrance, or the holder of the casino licence, may apply on the relevant form to the Gambling Commission for approval under subsection 1 or subsection 2. In considering whether to approve a proposed transferee or alienee, and any person with a significant influence under subsection 2 , the Gambling Commission must investigate the suitability of the proposed transferee or alienee, and person, in accordance with sections and A casino licence is not transferable except under section A person may apply to the Gambling Commission for a licence to conduct casino gambling.

On receiving an application under section , the Gambling Commission must investigate the applicant and any person with a significant influence under section Casino licence holders who propose to enter into a casino venue agreement must apply to the Gambling Commission for approval of the agreement before entering into it.

A party to a casino venue agreement who seeks to amend that agreement must apply to the Gambling Commission for approval of the amendment before the amendment is made. An application for approval under subsection 1 or subsection 2 must be on the relevant form. An application under section for the approval of a casino venue agreement or of an amendment to a casino venue agreement must be considered by the Gambling Commission.

The Gambling Commission may require the applicant to provide a copy of the proposed agreement and any other relevant information to assist the Gambling Commission to consider the application. In considering an application, the Gambling Commission must have regard to any suitability requirements specified in section that the Gambling Commission considers relevant.

The Gambling Commission must not approve a casino venue agreement or an amendment to a casino venue agreement unless it is satisfied that the agreement is conducive to the conduct of responsible gambling in the casino. The holder of a casino venue licence may apply to the Gambling Commission to renew the licence.

A casino impact report must be prepared by a person approved by the Commission as independent of the applicant, and must—. The Gambling Commission may specify the research to be undertaken in preparing a casino impact report.

The applicant for renewal of a casino venue licence must pay for the casino impact report. After receiving an application for renewal of a casino venue licence, the Gambling Commission must do the following things, although not necessarily in the order given:. Subsection 1 sets out the minimum that the Gambling Commission must do to determine an application for renewal of a casino venue licence, but the Gambling Commission may take additional steps, or repeat or combine processes, as the Gambling Commission considers appropriate.

Persons or groups who satisfy the Gambling Commission that they represent a section of the community in which the casino is located are entitled to appear and be heard at the public hearing of the application in person or by counsel or agent. In giving public notice under subsection 1 , it is sufficient for the Gambling Commission to publish the notice twice, at intervals of not more than 14 days, in a major newspaper circulating in the locality of the casino to which the application relates.

Before deciding whether to renew a casino venue licence, the Gambling Commission must consider—. The Gambling Commission must not renew a casino venue licence unless it is satisfied that—. A casino venue licence expires 25 years after the date the casino commenced operating. A licence that is renewed under section expires 15 years after the date of renewal. A casino venue licence to which an application for renewal relates continues in force until the Gambling Commission decides whether or not to renew that licence.

The Gambling Commission may specify the conditions of a casino licence or vary or revoke the conditions of a casino licence in the following circumstances:. The Gambling Commission must notify the holder of the relevant casino licence, the Secretary, and any other person who it considers is affected by a proposal to specify, vary, or revoke the conditions of a casino licence.

The holder of the casino licence, the Secretary, and any other person affected may make written submissions to the Gambling Commission concerning the proposal within 20 working days after the date of the notice under subsection 1 or within any longer period that the Gambling Commission allows. The Gambling Commission must consider any submissions made under subsection 3 and may, if it considers it appropriate, seek comment from the casino licence holder on the submissions received from the Secretary or other persons affected.

The Gambling Commission must notify the holder of the casino licence, the Secretary, and other persons affected of—. The Secretary may specify the minimum operating standards for the day-to-day operation of a casino, for inclusion in a casino licence, or vary or revoke those standards, in the following circumstances:.

Minimum operating standards must relate to any matter concerning the day-to-day operation of a casino, including but not limited to some or all of the matters specified in Schedule 2. The Secretary must notify the holder of the relevant casino licence and other persons who the Secretary considers are affected by a proposal to specify, vary, or revoke the minimum operating standards of the casino licence. The holder of the casino licence and other persons affected may make written submissions to the Secretary concerning the proposal within 20 working days after the date of the notice under subsection 1 or within any longer period that the Secretary allows.

The Secretary must consider any submissions made under subsection 3 and may, if he or she considers it appropriate, seek comment from the holder of the casino licence on the submissions received. The Secretary must notify the holder of the casino licence and other persons affected of—. The holder of a casino licence or other person affected may appeal to the Gambling Commission against a decision of the Secretary to specify, vary, or revoke, or to refuse to specify, vary, or revoke, the minimum operating standards of a casino licence.

The Gambling Commission must give notice of its decision, with reasons, to both the appellant and the Secretary. The Secretary may apply to the Gambling Commission for an order that a casino licence be suspended or cancelled if the Secretary is satisfied that—. The Gambling Commission must decide whether or not to grant an order sought by the Secretary under section after following the procedure outlined in this section.

The Gambling Commission may adjourn a hearing to allow the licence holder an opportunity to deal with any matters that the Gambling Commission requires the licence holder to deal with. The Gambling Commission may grant an order sought under section if it is satisfied that—. The Gambling Commission may exercise the power of suspension conferred by this section in respect of any breach that falls within section a or c whether or not—. If the Gambling Commission decides to suspend a casino licence, the Gambling Commission must notify the licence holder of—.

If the Gambling Commission decides to cancel a casino licence, the Gambling Commission must notify the licence holder of the date on which the cancellation takes effect, the reasons for the cancellation, and the right to appeal the decision under section The Gambling Commission may revoke a suspension if it is satisfied that the reasons for the suspension have been resolved.

A suspended casino licence must be cancelled if, at the end of the suspension period, the reasons for the suspension are not resolved to the satisfaction of the Gambling Commission. A person is not entitled to a refund of fees, taxes, or levies paid if the Gambling Commission suspends or cancels a casino licence.

No person may have or continue to have a significant influence in a casino unless that person is approved as an associated person for that casino—. The Secretary must not approve a person as an associated person unless the Secretary is satisfied that the person meets the suitability requirements specified in section In assessing suitability, the Secretary has the powers, and other persons have the obligations, in section as if references to the Gambling Commission were references to the Secretary.

If the Secretary refuses to approve a person as an associated person under this section, the person must not acquire or continue to hold the position or interest that confers the significant influence in the casino. A person who is approved under section 48 of the Casino Control Act as of the date this section comes into force is to be regarded as a person approved by the Secretary under subsection 1 as an associated person.

A person who has been refused status as an associated person in any of the circumstances described in section , or whose status as an associated person has been revoked under section , may appeal to the Gambling Commission against that refusal or revocation.

A person who acquires a significant influence in a casino and who is not approved as an associated person must inform the following persons of that significant influence:. If possible, a casino licence holder must apply to the Secretary for approval of a person as an associated person before that person acquires a significant influence in a casino. This section applies if a person acquires a significant influence in a casino without prior approval as an associated person. An affected transaction means any transaction by which a person acquired a significant influence in a casino without prior approval as an associated person, and includes all aspects of the means by which that influence was acquired.

If the Secretary refuses to approve a person with a significant influence as an associated person, the Secretary must then—. The Secretary may review the approval of a person as an associated person, and the provisions of section apply to a review as if it were an original investigation.

The Secretary may revoke the approval of a person as an associated person if, after a review, the Secretary considers that the person does not satisfy the suitability requirements specified in section The Secretary must notify the relevant person, and each casino licence holder with whom that person is associated, of a revocation under subsection 2.

The Gambling Commission may require a person who is refused status as an associated person or whose status as an associated person is revoked, and the relevant casino licence holder, to organise themselves to remove or circumvent the significant influence in the casino of the person. A person who holds a certificate of approval issued under section 57 of the Casino Control Act must be treated as if the person were a person who holds a certificate of approval issued under section A person employed in a casino to do an activity described in subsection 2 must hold a certificate of approval issued under section Regulations may be made under section that prescribe other classes of casino employees who require a certificate of approval.

A person engaged by a casino licence holder under a contract for services may be required to apply for a certificate of approval if the Secretary determines that the services relate to an activity described in subsection 2 or to an activity usually performed by a class of employees prescribed under subsection 3. An application for a certificate of approval must be made to the Secretary on the relevant standard form. On receiving an application for a certificate of approval, the Secretary must investigate and inquire as the Secretary considers necessary to enable the Secretary to consider the application properly.

The Police and any agency to whom the application is referred must inquire into and report to the Secretary on the applicant. The Secretary may refuse to grant an application if the applicant fails to provide information requested by the Secretary or refuses to have fingerprints or a photograph taken. Fingerprints provided by the Secretary to the Police or a government agency must be returned to the Secretary for destruction under subsection 6.

Fingerprints required by the Secretary must be destroyed by the Secretary immediately after the Secretary has made a decision as to whether or not to grant a certificate of approval. In considering an application for a certificate of approval, the Secretary may take into account the following matters:. The Secretary must not grant an application unless he or she is satisfied that the applicant is a suitable person to work in a casino. This section applies if the Secretary proposes to refuse to grant an application for a certificate of approval.

The notice must invite the applicant to make submissions to the Secretary on the matter, either in person or in writing, within 15 working days after the date on which the notice is given to the applicant, or within any further period that the Secretary allows if an application for an extension is made within the time period specified in this subsection.

If the applicant makes a submission to the Secretary within the time specified in subsection 3 , the Secretary must consider the submission before finally determining whether or not to grant the application. If the Secretary grants an application for a certificate of approval, the Secretary must issue to the applicant a certificate of approval in the form, and containing the information, specified in regulations made under section The Secretary may permit an applicant for a certificate of approval to commence employment in the casino or to undertake services for the casino licence holder before the application is determined subject to any terms, conditions, and restrictions that the Secretary considers appropriate.

A constable or a gambling inspector may apply to the Secretary for an order—. If the Secretary is satisfied that there are grounds to consider suspending or cancelling a certificate of approval, the Secretary must—. If the holder of the certificate of approval requests a hearing or the Secretary decides to hold a hearing, the Secretary must—. The grounds on which the Secretary may make an order suspending or cancelling a certificate of approval are as follows:.

The Secretary may suspend for up to 6 months, or cancel, a certificate of approval if the Secretary is satisfied that—. The Secretary must send a copy of the order and the reasons for it to the holder of the certificate of approval and notify the holder of the right of appeal under section The Secretary may revoke the suspension of a certificate of approval if the Secretary is satisfied that the matters for which the suspension was imposed have been resolved where possible and that it would be just to revoke the suspension.

The holder of a certificate of approval must not, in relation to a casino in which he or she is employed or with which he or she is associated,—. A person may appeal to the Gambling Commission against a decision of the Secretary to—.

The Gambling Commission must give notice of its decision, with reasons, to both the person and the Secretary. The Governor-General may, by Order in Council, make regulations prescribing the days on, and the hours during, which a licensed casino may conduct casino gambling and the activities that may be undertaken. Regulations made under subsection 3 must not override subsection 1 but may impose restrictions that are additional to the restrictions in that subsection.

Despite the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act , an on-licence granted under that Act for a licensed casino must be treated as authorising the sale of alcohol for consumption in the casino while the casino is lawfully operated. The holder of a casino licence must not charge or take a deposit, levy, or charge, directly or indirectly, to or from a person for the right to participate in casino gambling in the casino, except a commission or levy provided for in game rules.

It makes no difference under subsection 1 that a deposit, levy, or charge is, or is claimed to be, refundable. All books, records, and documents referred to in subsection 1 must be retained by the holder of the licence for 7 years after the completion of the last transaction to which they relate.

Subsection 4 and any other enactment or rule of law relating to the retention or destruction of books, records, and documents override subsection 3. The Secretary may impose conditions on an exemption or permission under subsection 2 for example, conditions relating to the security of the equipment or the period of its removal. The holder of a casino licence must not, without the written approval of the Secretary, enter into or be a party to a lease, contract, agreement, or arrangement whether written or unwritten with any other person for that person to lease, let, lend, or provide a thing or service in return for—.

The Secretary may, upon application, approve in writing a lease, contract, agreement, or arrangement referred to in subsection 1 if the Secretary considers that it is desirable or appropriate to do so in a particular case.

The holder of a casino licence must, if directed by the Secretary to do so, provide to the Secretary, within the time stipulated by the Secretary, the information that the Secretary thinks fit with respect to any lease, contract, agreement, or arrangement in this section and sections and referred to as the agreement , written or unwritten, with any other person relating to the casino.

Without limiting subsection 1 , the Secretary may require the following information:. The holder of a casino licence must, if directed by the Secretary to do so, provide to the Secretary, within the time that may be stipulated by him or her, a copy of the agreement if it is in writing. If, upon a review of any information or document provided under this section, the Secretary is satisfied that the continuance of the agreement jeopardises the integrity of gambling at the casino, he or she must, without delay, issue to the licensee who is the party to the agreement a notice requiring the licensee to demonstrate why the agreement should not be terminated.

If the Secretary issues a notice, he or she must, at the same time, provide a copy to the other party to the agreement. The holder of a casino licence who receives a notice under section may respond to the Secretary under section 4 not later than the date stipulated under section 5. The other party may make submissions to the Secretary not later than that stipulated date.

The Secretary must consider the response and any submissions made by the other party and,—. The agreement in question, if not sooner terminated by the parties to the agreement, is terminated by force of this Act on the date specified in the direction.

The termination of the agreement does not affect the rights and obligations of the parties up to the time of termination. No liability for breach of the agreement attaches to a party or the Secretary by reason only of its termination by force of this Act.

The manager or other principal officer of a bank in which the holder of a casino licence keeps and maintains an account for the casino must, if required in writing by the Secretary, provide to the Secretary a statement of account and any other information required by the Secretary, including copies of cheques or records relevant to the account.

No liability is incurred by the bank, the manager, or other principal officer for breach of trust or otherwise by reason only of providing information under this section. A gambling inspector must investigate, as soon as practicable, a complaint from a customer about the conduct of casino gambling. If, as a result of the investigation, the inspector is satisfied that any of the events in subsection 4 have occurred, the gambling inspector must provide a written report to the Secretary.

A complainant must be informed of the result of the investigation of his or her complaint and any consequent action taken. An authority given by the Gambling Commission must be for a period not exceeding 3 months. On granting an application, the Gambling Commission may impose reasonable conditions that the Gambling Commission thinks fit. The holder of a temporary authority has the same duties, obligations, and liabilities as the holder of the licence to which the temporary authority relates.

A society may engage a licensed promoter, for reward, to promote licensed class 3 gambling, which is not conducted regularly, on its behalf. Reward paid to a licensed promoter under subsection 1 may be by way of remuneration, commission, or otherwise, but must not exceed the lesser of—. A society must not engage a licensed promoter unless their relationship is covered by an agreement that satisfies any regulation made under section In this section, conducted regularly has the same meaning as in section 28 4.

In addition to any penalty that may be imposed under subsection 2 , a court may order that the licensed promoter forfeit to the Crown all reward paid to the licensed promoter by the society for promoting the class 3 gambling activity. The Secretary may return an incomplete application, and the accompanying bond and any fee, to an applicant. A person, other than the Police, must lodge an objection to an application within 1 month after notice of the application is first published.

The Secretary must send a copy of the objection to the applicant within 7 days after the objection is lodged with the Secretary. As soon as practicable after receiving the application, the Secretary must approve the person nominated as the surety, or refuse to approve the person. The Secretary may demand immediate payment of the bond, and the approved surety must satisfy that demand, if the licensed promoter does 1 or more of the following:. The Secretary must pay the bond received under subsection 1 into a bank account established to administer bonds.

The administrator may apply the bond received from an approved surety to compensate a society or participants in the class 3 gambling activity who have suffered loss or damage in the circumstances set out in section 1 as a result of the acts or omissions of the licensed promoter. If subsection 1 applies, the administrator must publish a notice twice, at intervals of not more than 14 days in a newspaper or newspapers that the administrator considers sufficient, inviting people to lodge claims with the administrator.

The administrator must not pay a claim until 6 months after the second notice required under section is given. A person required to provide information under subsection 2 must provide the information as promptly as is reasonable in the circumstances. The Secretary may take into account matters of a similar nature to those listed in subsection 2 that occurred outside New Zealand. The Secretary must also notify the Police if the Secretary takes any other action in respect of the licence.

Notice required under this section must be given to a senior constable ,—. If the Secretary decides to amend or revoke a condition or add a new condition to a licence, the Secretary must notify the licensed promoter of—. A licensed promoter must notify the Secretary and provide details of significant changes to the information supplied in, or accompanying, an application for a licence or an amendment to or renewal of a licence.

The Secretary may require the licensed promoter to apply for an amendment to the licence under section A or may invoke the suspension or cancellation provisions under section or as a result of the notification of changes.

The Secretary must keep and maintain a register that records the name and contact details of licensed promoters. The register must be made available for inspection to constables and the public. A licensed promoter may make written submissions to the Secretary concerning the proposed suspension, cancellation, or refusal to renew within—. If subsection 4 or subsection 5 applies, the Secretary must also notify the licensed promoter of—.

Section 5 and 6 apply to the cancellation of a suspended licence. The Gambling Commission must give notice of its decision, with reasons, to both the applicant or licensed promoter and to the Secretary. This section applies to all money raised by, or paid to, a licensed promoter including interest —. A licensed promoter must pay the money into a trust account, at a registered bank, operated either—. A licensed promoter must render an account to the society that sets out, in full, particulars of—.

A licensed promoter must pay all money held in the trust account on behalf of the society to the society—. The Secretary may, on the application of a person specified in subsection 2 , authorise the applicant or any other person to carry on the business of a licensed promoter for a period of up to 3 months. An applicant must, after lodging the application with the Secretary, send a copy of it to the Police. If the application is granted, the person who is authorised to carry on the business of the licensed promoter must be treated as if the person were the licensed promoter.

The Secretary must, after granting a licence under this section, notify the Police in accordance with section The Police may apply to the Secretary for an authorisation under section 1 to be revoked if there are grounds to believe that—. The Secretary may revoke the authorisation if the Secretary has good reason to believe that one or both of the grounds in subsection 1 have been established.

In determining whether the grounds in subsection 1 have been established, the Secretary may take into account matters that occurred outside New Zealand. The revocation does not take effect until the Secretary has notified the person concerned. This section applies if a licensed promoter is unable or unwilling to complete the promotion of a class 3 gambling activity.

If subsection 1 applies, the society on whose behalf the promotion was undertaken may ask the Secretary to—. This section is subject to sections and The Governor-General may, by Order in Council, make regulations for all or any of the following purposes:. The Governor-General may, on the recommendation of the Minister, appoint up to 5 Gambling Commissioners. A Gambling Commissioner is appointed for a term of up to 3 years as specified in the instrument of appointment.

A person appointed as a Gambling Commissioner may hold that office concurrently with other appointments. A Gambling Commissioner is not employed in the Government service for the purposes of the Government Superannuation Fund Act or the State services for the purposes of the State Sector Act only because the person is a Gambling Commissioner.

All Gambling Commissioners must have, in the opinion of the Minister, the knowledge, skills, and experience to enable them to assist in undertaking the functions, powers, and responsibilities of the Gambling Commission. A proposed Gambling Commissioner must disclose to the Minister, before appointment,—. The appointment of a Gambling Commissioner including the Chief Gambling Commissioner may be terminated by the Governor-General on the recommendation of the Minister for any reason justifying removal, including—.

Before recommending termination, the Minister must give the Gambling Commissioner the reasons for the proposed termination and a reasonable opportunity to be heard and to make submissions.

The Minister must advise the Gambling Commissioner and give him or her reasons in writing for the termination. Otherwise there's no fun. Businessmen often play with officials that always win.

Mah-jongg is widely played for money outside of China. Filipino president Estrada lost millions of dollars, gambling on mah-jongg. Many people play mah-jongg in legal and illegal mah-jongg parlors that are filled with smoking and cursing players, playing in tables packed closely to one another. Because of its association with gambling, mah-jongg has always been associated with prostitutes and opium dens. Some admit Chinese only. Others are owned by Chinese and receive power and water from China.

Casinos are illegal in China. Around 85 percent of the high rollers at Las Vegas are from Asia and increasingly from China. Chinese New Year is the biggest night of the year. The tables are laid out according to feng shui and Asian food is offered 24 hours a day. Mark Six is a popular underground casino game in which players try to guess the numbers on colored ping pong balls pulled out of a transparent cylinder.

A favorite game among Chinese is baccarat. Heaven-earth harmony is another popular Asian casino game in which a ping pong ball is dropped onto a grid with people betting in where it will land. In December , the Economist reported: Marble columns, gold decor and money are everywhere. But behind the glittering facades there are signs of something darker It is also fuelled by a stampede of nervous money fleeing the mainland. A look behind the scenes at Macau reveals a lot about Chinese corruption, and also about how scared many Chinese businessfolk are about the political climate back home.

The Economist, December 10, ]. Since when American casino operators first opened there, Macau has grown faster than a dealer sorts chips. Gaming revenues in the first 11 months of the year were 44 percent higher than in ; Macau is now four times bigger than Las Vegas.

Because gambling is illegal in mainland China, Macau is their destination of choice. In Las Vegas casinos carry out background checks on gamblers and lend to them directly.

At best there would be less money to lend. But junkets that could not collect debts might implode, leaving the casinos that had extended credit to them with big losses. Many casino executives do not seem to know how much money they have lent to junkets, which makes it hard to assess the possible extent of defaults. Casino operators, like their customers, remain sanguine about future winnings. According to analysts, no big junket has reported any issues with bad loans so far.

A casino executive said recently that he worried less about a junket going under than he did about the implication of a Macanese official in a corruption scandal or a murder at a casino. You can bet that the casinos want to avoid that.

Such people do not need loans to play and offer better margins, because casinos do not need to pay junkets a cut. A high-speed railway being built from Guangzhou to Macau will make it easier to lure them.

Some casinos are also building venues with less floor space for blackjack and more for shops, theatres and restaurants. This may help placate the government in Beijing, which would rather see its citizens shop for jewellery than for a different currency. But as long as money feels nervous in China, it will seek a way out, and Macau is awfully convenient. It is not just a passion for cards that brought more than A government official who has embezzled state funds, for example, may arrange to gamble in Macau through a junket.

When he arrives, his chips are waiting for him. When he cashes out, his winnings are paid in Hong Kong dollars, which he can stash in a bank in Hong Kong or take farther afield.

Some bypass junkets and instead use pawnshops and other stores, where they buy an item with yuan and promptly sell it back for Macanese pataca or Hong Kong dollarsless, of course, a generous cut for the shopkeeper. The flow of money through Macau has caught the eye of the government in Beijing and may explain a temporary crackdown in on the number of Macau visas given to mainland Chinese.

According to cables made public by WikiLeaks, an online troublemaker, others are also watching. The Los Angeles Times described a casino in Myanmar near the Chinese border that was housed in a warehouse-like building the size of two football fields and contained eight banks of roulette tables, rows of electronic blackjack machines and 12 pits for heaven-earth harmony.

Buses and vans in nearby town of Ruili ferry customers to the casino. There was no alcohol and almost no small talk. The gambling machines, chairs and tables were battered suggesting an operation than has been moved repeatedly. But if you have good connections you can stay in business even when the other are closed down. The government has shut down thousands of underground gambling parlors. In , the Chinese government launched a campaign to crack down on gambling in China and urged neighboring countries to help out.

We must stop this illegal activity. The move was prompted by embarrassing revelations about party cadres losing large amounts of public money at foreign casinos and local officials gambling during work hours at local tea houses. In , there were casinos across the border in Myanmar, Russia, North Korea, and Vietnam, most of them illegal. Under Chinese government campaign many were shut down.

As of April there were only 28 left. In Some cases the supplies of water and power were cut off to the towns that hosted the casinos. Thousands of underground betting parlors were shut down. Neighboring countries were told to close casinos at the border. A hour hotline was set up to receive tips on illegal gambling operations. Hundreds of thousands of gamblers were questioned or temporally detained. Tens of thousands were arrested, with the majority of them being released after paying a fine.

Indeed many places were shut down but they reopened after the authorities left and the campaign was over. Well-connected gambling houses even welcomed the campaign because it helped get rid of competitors. Many thought the crack down on gambling was absurd. China also loses an incredible amount of money overseas every year.

Hu has said it makes more sense to have some kind of regulated gambling in China to keep the money in the country. In it was home to 2, horses, of which about actually raced. Located outside Beijing, it covers acres and embraces two grass and one dirt track. The facility has seating for 40, but only drew around people per day its first season and once had about 1, people. The owners hoped they would fare better when the gaming laws are changed. Only members of the Jockey Club could bet and there were no bookies.

As of , the track conducted races twice a week during the racing season with a handful of races each of those days. Punters complained that the returns were too low to make betting worthwhile.

In , Tongshun was closed down by a court order after betters who lost money complained that gambling was taking place at the track. In January , the Chinese government announced the start of regular horse racing in the central city of Wuhan and said it was considering introducing betting on races there on an experimental basis in If the plan is approved it would mark the first time since the Communist Party took power in that real gambling on horse racing in China would be legal.

A test run of horse race betting was carried out in November at the China Speed Horse Open in Wuhan, signally a possible return of horse race gambling to China.

Each spectator was allowed to place two bets for free, and winners were given lottery ticket that gave them a chance of winning small amounts of money. Both betting and racing were outlawed in , and only riders and owners have been allowed to make money from the sport since it re-emerged in the 90s.

Tania Branigan, The Guardian, November 29, ]. Wuhan, the capital of Hubei province, was historically a center for racing and is keen to regain that status.

This autumn a commercial college in the city launched a three-year racing course which requires students to learn how to ride and to organize meetings as well as to study the theory of the sport.

According to the Changjiang Daily, individuals and groups could now apply to join a racing club and buy shares in the horses, allowing them to make money from races. There were some other horse tracks but they were closed down. A race course opened in Guangzhou in was closed down in and labeled an unsatisfactory experiment because authorities could not prevent people from placing bets on the horses. There are currently plans to open tracks in Hangzhou and Nanjing.

Mainland China had two lotteries as of But most Chinese gamblers use illicit channels or head to the Happy Valley racecourse in Hong Kong or the casinos of Macau. Although they are part of China, the territories' special status means the mainland sees little of their vast profits.

There are large number of lottery games in China. Extremely popular, they are allowed to exist and thrive because they are not technically regarded as gambling because they money the raise is supposed to help a worthy cause. The laws are full of loop holes and there is no monitoring system. Many lotteries operate under the pretense of raising money for charity but most of profits goes into the pockets of those who run the lottery. Local governments usually get a cut and have few incentives to report irregularities.

Bingo-style lotteries were introduced in Later, scratch lottery tickets with small prizes of two to 1, yuan were popular. If players in one game got three symbols, they got a chance to a appear on a television game show and go for prizes up to , yuan.

In Chinese lotteries, 55 percent of the receipts go to the players and the rest is supposed to go to finance projects for the handicapped, elderly and people in need. Authorities outlawed the practice of giving away televisions and refrigerators because too many of the ones given away were defective and winners complained. In , the Chinese government introduced a national lottery as a way of generating revenues.

Over 15 million tickets were sold in the first week. Smaller prizes were also awarded. Most of the money earned from the lottery was supposed to be spent on social welfare programs for laid off workers, disabled people and retirees. It was launched partly to deter illegal betting on foreign soccer games.

There are illegal soccer gambling networks that can accessed using the Internet that take in billions of dollars. People in all walks of life have become obsessed with lotteries. The cost of living in China has gone sky-high. Everyone wants to get rich. What is the fastest path to wealth? These people believed is lottery games. Some people steal large amounts of money to finance their lottery obsession.

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